Classic American West Coast Boxing

For discussions on the great and not so great fighters of the past.
Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

08 Jun 2009, 12:05

bennie wrote:
Randyman wrote:Image

The Salvador Sanchez-Wilfredo Gomez fight was one for the books and the article on Rocky Graziano was interesting but I posted this magazine strictly because of the Dream Fight query on the upper right hand corner. Sandy Saddler vs Danny Lopez? Was Danny good enough for Saddler? No one had a bigger heart than Danny......

Randy


It would not have been for the faint-hearted. Saddler (off the top of my head) is one of the few men in boxing to have scored over 100 knockouts.


I think Danny is good enough for anybody at 126lbs.
There were better boxers, but his heart and punch would fare well in any era.


-Rick Farris

bennie
Posts: 13468
Joined: 15 Nov 2002, 09:53

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

bennie

08 Jun 2009, 13:07

Rick Farris wrote:
bennie wrote:
Randyman wrote:Image

The Salvador Sanchez-Wilfredo Gomez fight was one for the books and the article on Rocky Graziano was interesting but I posted this magazine strictly because of the Dream Fight query on the upper right hand corner. Sandy Saddler vs Danny Lopez? Was Danny good enough for Saddler? No one had a bigger heart than Danny......

Randy


It would not have been for the faint-hearted. Saddler (off the top of my head) is one of the few men in boxing to have scored over 100 knockouts.


I think Danny is good enough for anybody at 126lbs.
There were better boxers, but his heart and punch would fare well in any era.


-Rick Farris


No arguments there, Rick. Anyone who wins a world tite in Ghana can beat anyone else at the weight (on his night). They shortened the 15th round to save David Kotey from bring stopped by Little Red.

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

08 Jun 2009, 13:30

No arguments there, Rick. Anyone who wins a world tite in Ghana can beat anyone else at the weight (on his night). They shortened the 15th round to save David Kotey from bring stopped by Little Red.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________


Bennie . . . I wasn't aware that the last round was shortened. Thanks for the info. Important to me.


-Rick Farris

scartissue
Posts: 836
Joined: 31 Mar 2002, 20:00

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

scartissue

08 Jun 2009, 15:50

Rick Farris wrote:Eder Jofre vs. Jose Medel . . .

I just watched this one. A must for anybody believes that Pac or Floyd is special.


-Rick Farris


Breathtaking pace. I wouldn't have blamed Jofre one bit if he sat down for '8', but he did not. Incredible comeback in the 9th (I think) before stopping Medal.

Scartissue

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

08 Jun 2009, 16:42

scartissue wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:Eder Jofre vs. Jose Medel . . .

I just watched this one. A must for anybody believes that Pac or Floyd is special.


-Rick Farris


Breathtaking pace. I wouldn't have blamed Jofre one bit if he sat down for '8', but he did not. Incredible comeback in the 9th (I think) before stopping Medal.

Scartissue


Scar . . . I've watched Jofre in both Harada fights, the only two losses on his record.
He was drained from making weight, but barely lost to the great Japanese boxer.
A great boxer, great puncher, everything. Jofre is one of my all-time favorites.


-Rick Farris

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

08 Jun 2009, 18:34

HENRY CLARK…

Image
June 8, 2009 by Jim Amato

There were many who thought he was going to be the next Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali. He was a tall, smooth boxing heavyweight with a world of potential. His professional career began in 1964 and before long he was mixing it up with some of the best fighters in the world. How’s this for starters? His pro debut was a four round decision loss to the rugged Joey Orbillo!

Less then two months later he pounded out a ten round verdict over future title challenger Manuel Ramos. The following year he whipped tough trial horse George “Scrapiron” Johnson. In 1966 he fought a No Decision bout with Amos “Big Train” Lincoln and he lost a decision to highly regarded Zora Folley.The year 1967 saw Henry establish himself as a force in the heavyweight division by winning on points over Bill McMurray, Steve Grant on two occasions, Fred Lewis, Eddie Machen and Roger Rischer.

Henry opened 1968 by defeating the clever Leotis Martin. This led Henry into a major bout against come backing ex-heavyweight king Sonny Liston. This was Sonny’s first major step on his comeback trail and he passed with flying colors. Sonny pummeled a game but overmatched Clark in scoring a seventh round stoppage.

The year 1969 had mixed results. Henry drew with Brian London and kayoed Bob Stallings. He then lost on points to “Florida” Al Jones and Jeff “Candy Slim” Merritt. In 1970 his best win was a points call over Jimmy “The King” Fletcher. In 1972 Henry won and lost to Jack “The Giant” O’Halloran. He was then stopped in nine rounds by an up and coming Ken Norton on the Muhammad Ali-Bob Foster under card.

Henry came back to win three bouts in 1973 and then on March 4th 1974 in a rematch, Henry blew out the now ranked Jeff Merritt in one round. Henry quickly followed with a decision win over faded ex-contender Mac Foster. Henry remained unbeaten through four more fights. It was then matched with the dangerous Earnie Shavers in Paris, France. Try as he might for the KO, Shavers was unable to stop the wily Clark and had to settle for a hard earned points win over Henry. They met again six months later on the under card of Ali-Norton III. This time Henry was overwhelmed by the murderous punching Shavers in two rounds. Henry attempted to bounce back four months later but was defeated over ten by Howard “Kayo” Smith. Henry did not fight again for over two and a half years. When he did return he was defeated in ten rounds by fringe contender Bernardo Mercado.

Henry’s final tally was 32 wins, 12 losses and four draws. He scored seven knockouts but he was only stopped on three occasions. That was by Liston, Norton and Shavers. No shame there.

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

08 Jun 2009, 19:43

kikibalt wrote:HENRY CLARK…

Image
June 8, 2009 by Jim Amato

There were many who thought he was going to be the next Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali. He was a tall, smooth boxing heavyweight with a world of potential. His professional career began in 1964 and before long he was mixing it up with some of the best fighters in the world. How’s this for starters? His pro debut was a four round decision loss to the rugged Joey Orbillo!

Less then two months later he pounded out a ten round verdict over future title challenger Manuel Ramos. The following year he whipped tough trial horse George “Scrapiron” Johnson. In 1966 he fought a No Decision bout with Amos “Big Train” Lincoln and he lost a decision to highly regarded Zora Folley.The year 1967 saw Henry establish himself as a force in the heavyweight division by winning on points over Bill McMurray, Steve Grant on two occasions, Fred Lewis, Eddie Machen and Roger Rischer.

Henry opened 1968 by defeating the clever Leotis Martin. This led Henry into a major bout against come backing ex-heavyweight king Sonny Liston. This was Sonny’s first major step on his comeback trail and he passed with flying colors. Sonny pummeled a game but overmatched Clark in scoring a seventh round stoppage.

The year 1969 had mixed results. Henry drew with Brian London and kayoed Bob Stallings. He then lost on points to “Florida” Al Jones and Jeff “Candy Slim” Merritt. In 1970 his best win was a points call over Jimmy “The King” Fletcher. In 1972 Henry won and lost to Jack “The Giant” O’Halloran. He was then stopped in nine rounds by an up and coming Ken Norton on the Muhammad Ali-Bob Foster under card.

Henry came back to win three bouts in 1973 and then on March 4th 1974 in a rematch, Henry blew out the now ranked Jeff Merritt in one round. Henry quickly followed with a decision win over faded ex-contender Mac Foster. Henry remained unbeaten through four more fights. It was then matched with the dangerous Earnie Shavers in Paris, France. Try as he might for the KO, Shavers was unable to stop the wily Clark and had to settle for a hard earned points win over Henry. They met again six months later on the under card of Ali-Norton III. This time Henry was overwhelmed by the murderous punching Shavers in two rounds. Henry attempted to bounce back four months later but was defeated over ten by Howard “Kayo” Smith. Henry did not fight again for over two and a half years. When he did return he was defeated in ten rounds by fringe contender Bernardo Mercado.

Henry’s final tally was 32 wins, 12 losses and four draws. He scored seven knockouts but he was only stopped on three occasions. That was by Liston, Norton and Shavers. No shame there.


Between 1966-68, Henry Clark fought four heavyweights that would die under mysterious circumstances within the next few years.
Sonny Liston, Eddie Machen, Roger Rischer and Zora Folley.


-Rick Farris

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

08 Jun 2009, 20:31

"TWO TON TONY"

Image

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

08 Jun 2009, 20:34

Image

scartissue
Posts: 836
Joined: 31 Mar 2002, 20:00

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

scartissue

08 Jun 2009, 22:44

kikibalt wrote:HENRY CLARK…

Image
June 8, 2009 by Jim Amato

There were many who thought he was going to be the next Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali. He was a tall, smooth boxing heavyweight with a world of potential. His professional career began in 1964 and before long he was mixing it up with some of the best fighters in the world. How’s this for starters? His pro debut was a four round decision loss to the rugged Joey Orbillo!

Less then two months later he pounded out a ten round verdict over future title challenger Manuel Ramos. The following year he whipped tough trial horse George “Scrapiron” Johnson. In 1966 he fought a No Decision bout with Amos “Big Train” Lincoln and he lost a decision to highly regarded Zora Folley.The year 1967 saw Henry establish himself as a force in the heavyweight division by winning on points over Bill McMurray, Steve Grant on two occasions, Fred Lewis, Eddie Machen and Roger Rischer.

Henry opened 1968 by defeating the clever Leotis Martin. This led Henry into a major bout against come backing ex-heavyweight king Sonny Liston. This was Sonny’s first major step on his comeback trail and he passed with flying colors. Sonny pummeled a game but overmatched Clark in scoring a seventh round stoppage.

The year 1969 had mixed results. Henry drew with Brian London and kayoed Bob Stallings. He then lost on points to “Florida” Al Jones and Jeff “Candy Slim” Merritt. In 1970 his best win was a points call over Jimmy “The King” Fletcher. In 1972 Henry won and lost to Jack “The Giant” O’Halloran. He was then stopped in nine rounds by an up and coming Ken Norton on the Muhammad Ali-Bob Foster under card.

Henry came back to win three bouts in 1973 and then on March 4th 1974 in a rematch, Henry blew out the now ranked Jeff Merritt in one round. Henry quickly followed with a decision win over faded ex-contender Mac Foster. Henry remained unbeaten through four more fights. It was then matched with the dangerous Earnie Shavers in Paris, France. Try as he might for the KO, Shavers was unable to stop the wily Clark and had to settle for a hard earned points win over Henry. They met again six months later on the under card of Ali-Norton III. This time Henry was overwhelmed by the murderous punching Shavers in two rounds. Henry attempted to bounce back four months later but was defeated over ten by Howard “Kayo” Smith. Henry did not fight again for over two and a half years. When he did return he was defeated in ten rounds by fringe contender Bernardo Mercado.

Henry’s final tally was 32 wins, 12 losses and four draws. He scored seven knockouts but he was only stopped on three occasions. That was by Liston, Norton and Shavers. No shame there.


I like Jim Amato's pieces, but sometimes they are so formulaic, like he's reading it out of a book. For one that is a picture of Ken Norton and Larry Holmes. What's that got to do with Henry Clark? And second, I wish he would have delved into a very interesting aspect of Clark's career - and I thought he was when he mentioned about him being stopped 3 times - and that is the fact that despite duking it out with guys that could really pop like Sonny Liston, Ken Norton, Earnie Shavers, Jeff Merritt, Mac Foster, Zora Folley, Eddie Machen and Leotis Martin, he was never knocked down in his career. Some achievement considering who he shared the ring with.

Scartissue

dagosd2000
Posts: 5574
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 03:31
Location: san diego ca

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

dagosd2000

08 Jun 2009, 22:47

dagosd2000 wrote:Image

Joe Louis

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-13ww045Fo

Joe Louis Was A Fighting Man



Painted this one this morning. Then I went to visit a friend in the hospital. Next stop was lunch with some old friends. When I got back home I got a call from a dealer in New York that I've worked with before. Wants to show this in Manhattan. Maybe that will pay for expenses in Spain. :bow:

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

08 Jun 2009, 22:53

dagosd2000 wrote:
dagosd2000 wrote:Image

Joe Louis

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-13ww045Fo

Joe Louis Was A Fighting Man



Painted this one this morning. Then I went to visit a friend in the hospital. Next stop was lunch with some old friends. When I got back home I got a call from a dealer in New York that I've worked with before. Wants to show this in Manhattan. Maybe that will pay for expenses in Spain. :bow:


That would be great. Good luck, Roger!

dagosd2000
Posts: 5574
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 03:31
Location: san diego ca

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

dagosd2000

08 Jun 2009, 23:07

scartissue wrote:
kikibalt wrote:HENRY CLARK…

Image
June 8, 2009 by Jim Amato

There were many who thought he was going to be the next Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali. He was a tall, smooth boxing heavyweight with a world of potential. His professional career began in 1964 and before long he was mixing it up with some of the best fighters in the world. How’s this for starters? His pro debut was a four round decision loss to the rugged Joey Orbillo!

Less then two months later he pounded out a ten round verdict over future title challenger Manuel Ramos. The following year he whipped tough trial horse George “Scrapiron” Johnson. In 1966 he fought a No Decision bout with Amos “Big Train” Lincoln and he lost a decision to highly regarded Zora Folley.The year 1967 saw Henry establish himself as a force in the heavyweight division by winning on points over Bill McMurray, Steve Grant on two occasions, Fred Lewis, Eddie Machen and Roger Rischer.

Henry opened 1968 by defeating the clever Leotis Martin. This led Henry into a major bout against come backing ex-heavyweight king Sonny Liston. This was Sonny’s first major step on his comeback trail and he passed with flying colors. Sonny pummeled a game but overmatched Clark in scoring a seventh round stoppage.

The year 1969 had mixed results. Henry drew with Brian London and kayoed Bob Stallings. He then lost on points to “Florida” Al Jones and Jeff “Candy Slim” Merritt. In 1970 his best win was a points call over Jimmy “The King” Fletcher. In 1972 Henry won and lost to Jack “The Giant” O’Halloran. He was then stopped in nine rounds by an up and coming Ken Norton on the Muhammad Ali-Bob Foster under card.

Henry came back to win three bouts in 1973 and then on March 4th 1974 in a rematch, Henry blew out the now ranked Jeff Merritt in one round. Henry quickly followed with a decision win over faded ex-contender Mac Foster. Henry remained unbeaten through four more fights. It was then matched with the dangerous Earnie Shavers in Paris, France. Try as he might for the KO, Shavers was unable to stop the wily Clark and had to settle for a hard earned points win over Henry. They met again six months later on the under card of Ali-Norton III. This time Henry was overwhelmed by the murderous punching Shavers in two rounds. Henry attempted to bounce back four months later but was defeated over ten by Howard “Kayo” Smith. Henry did not fight again for over two and a half years. When he did return he was defeated in ten rounds by fringe contender Bernardo Mercado.

Henry’s final tally was 32 wins, 12 losses and four draws. He scored seven knockouts but he was only stopped on three occasions. That was by Liston, Norton and Shavers. No shame there.


I like Jim Amato's pieces, but sometimes they are so formulaic, like he's reading it out of a book. For one that is a picture of Ken Norton and Larry Holmes. What's that got to do with Henry Clark? And second, I wish he would have delved into a very interesting aspect of Clark's career - and I thought he was when he mentioned about him being stopped 3 times - and that is the fact that despite duking it out with guys that could really pop like Sonny Liston, Ken Norton, Earnie Shavers, Jeff Merritt, Mac Foster, Zora Folley, Eddie Machen and Leotis Martin, he was never knocked down in his career. Some achievement considering who he shared the ring with.

Scartissue


MY VIEW OF CLARK

Henry Clark looked a lot like Muhammad Ali,all over. In the face.Same skin color. He could box. He even wore the white trunks with the white shoes.But stop it right there. If you had to compare the hearts of each fighter,you could put Henry's in the "Take It Or Leave It" category.

Henry bounced around pretty good throughout his career. For a short period he was a rival with Big Jack O'Halloran here in San Diego. They fought twice splitting 10 round decisions. To be honest, watching Clark workout,I didn't think the actor in Superman belonged in the same ring with Henry.

Like I said, Henry could box. Big Jack fought like a box. But the difference was clear cut. Big Jack had a big heart. Henry...well more often than not he left his out of the ring.

I wanted Henry to win. I'd see openings(that I know Henry was looking at too)but he didn't take advantage of them.Big Jack lumbered forward.He was right there,but Clark didn't want it as bad. Henry was no Manassa Mauler when it came to wanting to dismantle an opponent

After Kenny Norton was flattened by Jose Luis Garcia in L.A.,Norton was trying to re establish himself. Henry Clark was in his way. I thought Norton would be an easy target for Clark. Well,it was the fight that motivated Kenny to get a chance with Ali. Clark? He just kept shufflin' along. Only a pale image of The Greatest.

bennie
Posts: 13468
Joined: 15 Nov 2002, 09:53

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

bennie

09 Jun 2009, 03:18

Rick Farris wrote:No arguments there, Rick. Anyone who wins a world tite in Ghana can beat anyone else at the weight (on his night). They shortened the 15th round to save David Kotey from bring stopped by Little Red.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________


Bennie . . . I wasn't aware that the last round was shortened. Thanks for the info. Important to me.


-Rick Farris


It was also refereed by the famous and vastly experienced British referee, Harry Gibbs, who later hailed it as the greatest fight he ever handled.

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 09:48

English villagers try to save struggling pubs

Image
Bridget Jones / Associated Press

Monica Shackelly chats with customer Leslie Hathaway at the Chequers pub in Chipping Norton, England.
Money woes brought on by regulations, taxes and competition force many beloved taverns in the countryside to close their doors. But locals in a few spots have managed to keep the ale flowing.

By Henry Chu
June 9, 2009

Reporting from Kentisbeare, England -- Last summer, the tranquil English village of Kentisbeare woke up to find a dagger piercing its heart.

The man who ran the neighborhood pub, the Wyndham Arms, had decided to call it quits. Hit by hard times, he locked up one evening and never came back, leaving the village bereft of its "local," the watering hole down the road where, for more than 200 years, the good folk here could always drop in for a pint, a pie or a piece of gossip.

The tavern seemed destined to become yet another lost marker of traditional village life, bound for the same remorseless oblivion that had already swallowed the baker's, the butcher's and the petrol station in this lazy green countryside where bluebells nod in the breeze, medieval church towers loom like giant chess pieces and thatched roofs peek coyly through the leaves.

This time, though, residents drew a line. They retrieved the keys to the pub, renovated the whitewashed 16th century building themselves and reopened it less than two months later.

"People couldn't bear the thought of it being boarded up," said Mavis Durrant, 67, a lifelong resident of the village in southwestern England. "There's something very appealing about a country pub, isn't there?"

Indeed. For centuries, virtually nothing has been more central to the good cheer and cozy charm of English village life than the local pub, whose name alone -- the Bishop's Finger, the Drunken Duck, the Quiet Woman, the Moorend Spout -- could summon a smile.

But feel-good stories like the rescue of the Wyndham Arms are rare these days, because pubs are closing down across Britain faster than a thirsty man can down a pint. Colorful and often iconic establishments that managed to survive civil wars, frowning Victorian teetotalism and tales of being haunted are increasingly buckling under to modern market forces, higher taxes and lifestyle changes.

Every week, 39 alehouses call for "last orders" one final time, according to the British Beer and Pub Assn. All told, more than 2,000 taverns have shut down since March of last year, at a cost of 20,000 jobs.

It's an especially distressing turn of events for those in the countryside, who warn that villages may eventually be reduced to little more than rural dormitories, stripped of the shops, services and gathering places that gave them a sense of identity and cohesion.

"We risk undoing centuries of tradition. An English pub is absolutely part and parcel of English society and community," said Nick Harvey, a member of Parliament for North Devon, a district in western England where 70 to 80 taverns remain, down from more than 100 just a few years ago.

In many neighborhoods, Harvey said, "the shops have gone, the garage has gone, everything has gone. The pub is the only thing left."

Britain remains home to 57,000 pubs, including some alehouses that can trace their history to Saxon times. Many still sport the dimly lit interiors, snug alcoves, crackling fireplaces and agreeably low ceilings made of old wooden beams (with signs warning taller customers, "Duck or grouse") that give old public houses their unique flavor.

Between pulls at the tap and backhanded wipes of the mouth, proprietors and regulars sketch various reasons for the pub's rapid decline.

Government rules that have allowed big chains to buy up or control thousands of alehouses can make life tough for the tenants who lease the pubs and try to turn a profit. High alcohol duties have steadily pushed up prices at the bar stool, even as supermarkets sell beer at cut-rate prices to draw in customers content to drink at home.

Modern times have also brought new habits and ideas. Because of safety regulations, construction workers and tradesmen no longer have a quick pint during their lunch hour. Britons are now more mobile, meaning they don't have to stick to their hometown bar. And rising prosperity, before the current recession struck, spurred demands for better food, flashier decoration and more options for families with young children.

Pub managers and traditionalists grumble loudest over the smoking ban instituted in 2007. Business has gone down as a result, publicans say, though the move also brought in some new customers.

But in spite of all the changes, the neighborhood pub remains at the heart of community life in countless towns and villages.

Words written 70 years ago to describe the pub's preeminent position in British society still resonate today in those places.

"Of the social institutions that mold men's lives between home and work . . . the pub has more buildings, holds more people, takes more of their time and money, than church, cinema, dance hall and political organizations put together," the pop-sociological movement Mass-Observation reported in the 1930s.

At the pub, the report said, your hard-earned shilling bought not just a beer but an experience.

You could drink, talk, think, smoke, play cards, throw darts, spit, bet and sing. Equally enjoyable side activities included weddings and funerals, "quarrels and fights," sex, secret-society meetings, religious processions, crime, prostitution and, rather mystifyingly for the contemporary pubgoer, "pigeon flying."

The loss of such an important social nerve center can be devastating for a small community -- akin to the death of an old friend, as the quiet village of Bickington learned.

Like Kentisbeare, Bickington sits primly in Devon, in a rustic landscape of sun-dappled fields sliced into puzzle pieces by high hedgerows. The "green and pleasant land" hymned by the English poet William Blake doesn't get any greener or pleasanter than this.

Villagers watched in dismay as their police station, post office and mechanic's shop gradually went out of business. When the firm that owned the local pub, the Toby Jug, decided to cut costs and close down the tavern several years ago, it was "the final blow" to communal life, said Caroline Meek, whose family has lived in Bickington since 1809.

"At the moment, if we see each other, it just happens to be out and about . . . catching five minutes here or there," Meek said of the village's residents. "Before, that would've happened in the pub over a nice drink."

Villagers have lobbied the Toby Jug's owner to reopen it, to no avail. They hold a candlelight vigil for their dearly departed tavern every Christmas Eve, out of both a sense of mourning and hope, but the building remains shuttered and forlorn, its white walls dingy from neglect, its quaint old sign missing.

"When you used to walk down there when the lights were on, on a cold winter's night, and there was a roaring fire on, that was a lovely feeling," said Meek, 34. "When you see it now, it just looks like a gray shell, and it's quite sad."

With the nearest pub at least three miles in either direction, "we're kind of marooned. We have to get in a car or catch a taxi," Meek said. "My husband is quite a traditional chap really, and going to the pub is something he'd like to do with his friends once a week, twice a week. It takes a tremendous effort to try to do that."

Bickington's fate is precisely what Mike Scales sought to avert in Kentisbeare when he rallied his neighbors to help save the Wyndham Arms last summer.

By then, the tavern was ailing, no longer as well frequented as it once was, which residents attribute to poor management by the man who ran it until he gave up last July.

The threat of losing the place altogether galvanized 80 volunteers from the village who spent eight weeks scrubbing, stripping, painting, hammering, wiring and redecorating the former farmhouse, whose wooden rafters were erected when their grandfathers' grandfathers hadn't been born.

"We had people in here seven days a week, on different shifts, from 8 o'clock in the morning till sunset," said Scales, a genial 61-year-old who has been involved in the pub industry, mostly as an auditor, since leaving the navy 35 years ago.

"I was probably one of the few that kept coming, and that's why I didn't want to see it go," he said of the Wyndham Arms, which is named after the family that at one time virtually owned Kentisbeare. "It's the center of the village."

Enterprise Inns, the company that owns the tavern, was so impressed by the community's efforts that it agreed to throw in $150,000 to overhaul the roof and the heating system. Scales is now busy putting in a new kitchen.

He knows the battle for survival isn't over. To remain a viable concern, the alehouse has to keep customers coming back, which is why it serves better food, welcomes children and dogs, and, as its latest innovation, offers Wi-Fi.

But for now the inhabitants of Kentisbeare once more have somewhere to go for a pint and a chat, especially the elderly regulars -- "the gargoyles," Scales calls them -- who like to come in the early evening.

"People need to talk to each other. They need to communicate. They need to feel as though they belong to a community," Scales said. "If I've done nothing in my miserable life, this is perhaps one good thing."

Then he got up to make a round of the tables, among laughing and chatting customers who greeted him by name.

Cheers!

henry.chu@latimes.com

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 10:00

I posted the above article with Bennie and our friends from across the pond in mind.... :TU:

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 10:27

Image

Image

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 10:46

Image

Image

raylawpc
Posts: 4871
Joined: 21 Mar 2008, 17:21

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

raylawpc

09 Jun 2009, 11:00

Expug wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:Sonny Ray & The Seaside Gym . . .

I remember seeing Sonny Ray at amateur boxing shows all thru the later 60's.
Sonny worked with Ernie DeFrance and company at Long Beach's Seaside Gym.
Jake Shagrue took over the place around that time.

In 1969, Sonny joined DeFrance, Jake Horn, and Memo Soto as a coach for our Southern Pacific AAU team.
We'd compete in the Nationals in San Diego in early April.
We'd all be lodged at the Le Baron Hotel on San Diego's Hotel Circle.

Sonny Ray was born in Tennesee in 1936. He grew up in Chicago but would begin his pro boxing career in California, at age 18.
From the mid-50's-to-60's, Ray fought some of the best lightheavy's of the era.
In 1959, he took on World Light Heavyweight champ, Harold Johnson, in a ten-rounder at Chicago Stadium. Losing by 10th rd. TKO.
A year later, he returned to Chicago Stadium to fight another light-heavy champ, Willie Pastrano. He lost a close decision.

Sonny wasn't afraid to fight the best in their hometowns.
He'd travel to Peru to face, Mauro Mina.
In London, he'd fight Chic Calderwood at Wembley Stadium.
In Hawaii, he'd face Bobo Olson.

Between ages 18 and 30, Sonny Ray fought nearly fifty pro fights.
When he joined our AAU team as a coach, he was 33, had retired three years earlier after losing to Matt Blow in San Bernardino.
He was quiet, spoke when it was necessary and wasn't afraid to bark at the Long Beach boxers.
Everybody liked the man, and respected him.

The only time I saw Sonny Ray smile was after the tournament finals.
The old men were all in one of the coach's rooms. They had a card table set up, cards and poker chips out.
With money on the table and a bath tub filled with ice and booze, they were good for the night.
We were looking for women, and so was everybody else. Some upped their odds below the border.

We'd leave for home the next day. More than 350 boxers were suddenly running wild thru the hotel, San Siego, and T.J.
The fights were over. The dogs were all let out for the night. No woman was safe.
However, the older guys let the younger guys go out and get themselves in trouble. They'd all been there, done that, no mas.

Our lightweight punched out a bartender in TJ.
A couple days later his dad bailed him out of the Tijuana Jail.
There were other adventures.

The old guys played it smart. Drank all night, poker all night. Eventually they went to sleep.
The next day, all coaches were ready to leave early.
Some of us were suffering pain that had nothing to do with punches.

Sonny Ray just shook his head.


-Rick Farris




Rick , looking at Sonny Rays record, I see that he fought Rico Brooks in 1955.
Rico fought Ken Norton in 1975.
I believe Tom/ Raylaw was in Ricos corner.
Which reminds me, where is Tom. I hope hes ok . He hasnt felt well lately.


I was in Norton's corner.

BTW, my thanks to Frank for checking up on me due to my absense from the forum while I worked on my writing project.

I was disappointed to learn that you canceled your day trip to Tom's Farm. I was looking forward to seeing all the pictures I knew Frank, Roger, Rick and Randy would take and post on the forum.

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 11:09

Image

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Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

09 Jun 2009, 12:12

kikibalt wrote:Image

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Th Babe Herman fight must have been a match made by Hap Navarro.
Whenever I see the name Lauro Salas, I think of my uncle Jess. Salas and Arargon were his favorite fighters.


-Rick Farris

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 12:35

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kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 12:39

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kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 12:48

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kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

09 Jun 2009, 13:08

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