Classic American West Coast Boxing

For discussions on the great and not so great fighters of the past.
kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 15:53

You're right, Rick, I don't think anybody can question Joe's heart, just that his skills didn't match his heart and that is very much open to debate....

scartissue
Posts: 836
Joined: 31 Mar 2002, 20:00

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

scartissue

23 Feb 2009, 15:53

kikibalt wrote:Dan, you would be hard press to fine somebody inside the L.A. boxing community that was around at that time to say that Joe Medrano was a "Hot prospect" he was more of a hot club fighter, I knew Joe from the Jr's and he was always a tough fighter with little skills, I don't mean to rag on Joe as I liked the guy as a friend but, it is what it is.


I think the fine line between hot prospect and hot clubfighter is, one does not know how far the prospect can go, whereas the hot clubfighter is gone as far as he can but will still pack them in. Defininitely a Flavio Barcena fits that mold. Man, he would really pack them in, as you were going to look at a distance fight with punches thrown non-stop. That kid from the early '80s also fits that mold. Tommy Cordova, I think he was from New Mexico. Anyway, with Joe, Jorge Rodriguez finished any thought of how far he could go. I definitely bow to yours and Ricks view of him as you guys had seen so much of him. Still, prior to the 2nd Rodriguez fight, it would have been cool to see him against a Tury Pineda as Don Chargin had proposed.

Scartissue

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 15:59

kikibalt wrote:Dan, you would be hard press to fine somebody inside the L.A. boxing community that was around at that time to say that Joe Medrano was a "Hot prospect" he was more of a hot club fighter, I knew Joe from the Jr's and he was always a tough fighter with little skills, I don't mean to rag on Joe as I liked the guy as a friend but, it is what it is.


Again I must agree with Frank. Joe Medrano didn't have the goods. I'm not saying he wasn't strong, or tough, but we had lots of guys who were better than Medrano, and many more who were as good. One thing about Jackie McCoy, he would match his boxers well, and had a promoter that would do whatever she could to benefit the box office. Against a world class boxer (in the ring, not the gym) Joe would have been a wash out. I was no world beater, and some of you here may disagree, but style make fights and if I fought him in shape, I believe I would have beaten him. I would fight him today, if it were possible. I'm serious!

-Rick

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 16:09

Hot prospects are fighters that can be seen as future champions, such as Danny Lopez, Bobby Chacon, Mando ramos,etc, Joe Medrano was never seen in that light by anybody that I know of, nobody was talking title shot down the road for Joe, fighters like Joe are use to fill dates in between the prospects fights, they are a very important part of the boxing community though, with out them there would be no weekly fights, I don't want anybody to think that I'm looking down on them as I know that thy fight just as hard as a prospect.
Last edited by kikibalt on 23 Feb 2009, 16:42, edited 1 time in total.

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 16:30

scartissue wrote:
kikibalt wrote:Dan, you would be hard press to fine somebody inside the L.A. boxing community that was around at that time to say that Joe Medrano was a "Hot prospect" he was more of a hot club fighter, I knew Joe from the Jr's and he was always a tough fighter with little skills, I don't mean to rag on Joe as I liked the guy as a friend but, it is what it is.


I think the fine line between hot prospect and hot clubfighter is, one does not know how far the prospect can go, whereas the hot clubfighter is gone as far as he can but will still pack them in. Defininitely a Flavio Barcena fits that mold. Man, he would really pack them in, as you were going to look at a distance fight with punches thrown non-stop. That kid from the early '80s also fits that mold. Tommy Cordova, I think he was from New Mexico. Anyway, with Joe, Jorge Rodriguez finished any thought of how far he could go. I definitely bow to yours and Ricks view of him as you guys had seen so much of him. Still, prior to the 2nd Rodriguez fight, it would have been cool to see him against a Tury Pineda as Don Chargin had proposed.

Scartissue



Scar . . . I believe that Medrano would have had a chance with Pineda (?), however, I was never all that impressed with Turi either. He certainly had heavy hands, and believe it or not, a Herald-Examiner news clip shows that I was schelduled to fight Pineda in his second L.A. appearance in April, 1971 (I'll find it and have it posted). It was a five-round prelim on the undercard featuring a couple other guys I fought, Bennie Rodriguez and Frankie Granados. The night before the bout, I was involved in a car accident. I was not injured by the collision, however, the car had tipped over onto it's side and I had to crawl thru a broken winshield to escape. I cut my right hand on the broken glass and was unable to fight the next day. My replacement was Gabe Gutierrez (a guy I fought 3 times) and Gutierrez dropped a decision after giving Pineda a close fight. I will say this, Turi had the bomb in both hands. He got the gift of a lifetime when he fought Mando Ramos, who was a shell of his former self when Pineda stopped him. If Mando was just half the guy he was when he fought Sugar Ramos, he'd have destroyed Turi Pineda. Comparing a Pineda with a Ramos is like comparing MacDonald's ground beef with a N.Y. Steak. :TU:
Comparing Ramos to Medrano would be like comparing N.Y. Steak with a small bag of cold Mac's french fries. :lol:

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 16:43

kikibalt wrote:Hot prospects are fighter that can be seen as future champions, such as Danny Lopez, Bobby Chacon, Mando ramos,etc, Joe Medrano was never seen in that light by anybody that I know of, nobody was talking title shot down the road for Joe, fighters like Joe are use to fill dates in between the prospects fights, they are a very important part of the boxing community though, with out them there would be no weekly fights, I don't want anybody to think that I'm looking down on them as I know that thy fight just as hard as a prospect.


I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris
Last edited by Rick Farris on 23 Feb 2009, 17:05, edited 1 time in total.

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 16:56

Rick Farris wrote:
kikibalt wrote:Hot prospects are fighter that can be seen as future champions, such as Danny Lopez, Bobby Chacon, Mando ramos,etc, Joe Medrano was never seen in that light by anybody that I know of, nobody was talking title shot down the road for Joe, fighters like Joe are use to fill dates in between the prospects fights, they are a very important part of the boxing community though, with out them there would be no weekly fights, I don't want anybody to think that I'm looking down on them as I know that thy fight just as hard as a prospect.


I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris

-Rick Farris

Andy Price a class art? you-betcha! did I ever tell a you story about a kid I had fighting Andy in the Jr.GG finals in the old Valley Garden Arena in 1964?

scartissue
Posts: 836
Joined: 31 Mar 2002, 20:00

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

scartissue

23 Feb 2009, 17:11

I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris[/quote]

Indeed he is. I sat with Andy and his wife at the very first WBHF banquet I attended. An absolute great guy. The following year I was not so fortunate. Me and Pops found ourselves sitting with Michael Buffer. Between the can-o-tan, the hair mousse and his nose in the air, I found myself looking around for Andy Price. Still laugh at my Pop's view of him. "Buffer's a bit of ja**ff, isn't he?" LOL!!!

Scartissue

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 17:16

kikibalt wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:
kikibalt wrote:Hot prospects are fighter that can be seen as future champions, such as Danny Lopez, Bobby Chacon, Mando ramos,etc, Joe Medrano was never seen in that light by anybody that I know of, nobody was talking title shot down the road for Joe, fighters like Joe are use to fill dates in between the prospects fights, they are a very important part of the boxing community though, with out them there would be no weekly fights, I don't want anybody to think that I'm looking down on them as I know that thy fight just as hard as a prospect.


I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris

-Rick Farris

Andy Price a class art? you-betcha! did I ever tell a you story about a kid I had fighting Andy in the Jr.GG finals in the old Valley Garden Arena in 1964?


Is that the kid who saw Price climb into the ring and suddenly decided he wasn't going tofight him? Andy was smooth and slick, as a Jr. Glover he was like a miniture Hedgeman Lewis. They looked like brothers and had similar styles. You had to be at the El Monte Legion the night we fought in an exhibition in late 1968. The fight was stopped when I hurt him with a hook to the liver. I had boxed with Andy two years earlier (1966) at Hoover Street Gym. At the time, Andy had more experience than me and I left the gym with a black eye. Two tears later, I didn't give him any room to work, I fought him close and to be honest, a little dirty. He was complaining to the ref when hit him with the liver shot and a couple more when he hit the deck. The "exhibition" was stopped. Andy went on to whip Carlos Palomino and Pepino Cuevas in the pros. Today he works for the L.A. City Parks & Rec. dept. out of Lincoln Park in ELA.

-Rick

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 17:18

scartissue wrote:I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris


Indeed he is. I sat with Andy and his wife at the very first WBHF banquet I attended. An absolute great guy. The following year I was not so fortunate. Me and Pops found ourselves sitting with Michael Buffer. Between the can-o-tan, the hair mousse and his nose in the air, I found myself looking around for Andy Price. Still laugh at my Pop's view of him. "Buffer's a bit of ja**ff, isn't he?" LOL!!!

Scartissue[/quote]
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cheers to Pop Hanley :TU: Tell your dad Hi Dan.

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 17:22

Rick Farris wrote:
scartissue wrote:I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris

Indeed he is. I sat with Andy and his wife at the very first WBHF banquet I attended. An absolute great guy. The following year I was not so fortunate. Me and Pops found ourselves sitting with Michael Buffer. Between the can-o-tan, the hair mousse and his nose in the air, I found myself looking around for Andy Price. Still laugh at my Pop's view of him. "Buffer's a bit of ja**ff, isn't he?" LOL!!!

Scartissue

Cheers to Pop Hanley :TU: Tell your dad Hi Dan.


From Andy Price to Michael Buffer! poo!!

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 17:24

Rick Farris wrote:
kikibalt wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:Hot prospects are fighter that can be seen as future champions, such as Danny Lopez, Bobby Chacon, Mando ramos,etc, Joe Medrano was never seen in that light by anybody that I know of, nobody was talking title shot down the road for Joe, fighters like Joe are use to fill dates in between the prospects fights, they are a very important part of the boxing community though, with out them there would be no weekly fights, I don't want anybody to think that I'm looking down on them as I know that thy fight just as hard as a prospect.

I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris

-Rick Farris
Andy Price a class art? you-betcha! did I ever tell a you story about a kid I had fighting Andy in the Jr.GG finals in the old Valley Garden Arena in 1964?

Is that the kid who saw Price climb into the ring and suddenly decided he wasn't going tofight him? Andy was smooth and slick, as a Jr. Glover he was like a miniture Hedgeman Lewis. They looked like brothers and had similar styles. You had to be at the El Monte Legion the night we fought in an exhibition in late 1968. The fight was stopped when I hurt him with a hook to the liver. I had boxed with Andy two years earlier (1966) at Hoover Street Gym. At the time, Andy had more experience than me and I left the gym with a black eye. Two tears later, I didn't give him any room to work, I fought him close and to be honest, a little dirty. He was complaining to the ref when hit him with the liver shot and a couple more when he hit the deck. The "exhibition" was stopped. Andy went on to whip Carlos Palomino and Pepino Cuevas in the pros. Today he works for the L.A. City Parks & Rec. dept. out of Lincoln Park in ELA.

-Rick

Thats the one, Rick.

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 17:57

Image
Andy "The Hawk" Price & Burt Reynolds

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 18:02

Image
Andy "The Hawk" Price
2007

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 18:05

Image
Frankie Baltazar & Andy "The Hawk" Price
2007

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 19:21

Rick, look at this

Image
Just a Number: 51 Year Old Heavyweight Hassan Chitsaz Targets Evander Holyfield and the Heavyweight Title
Interview by Dan Hernandez-February 23, 2009

“I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life.”--Hassan Chitsaz

As the reigning elder statesman of active heavyweight fighters, Hassan E. Chitsaz is on a mission to accomplish his boxing dream and becoming the first man of Iranian decent to become a professional heavyweight champion of the world. Knowing the odds against his success, including obtaining the necessary license to fight in the United States and the inability to obtain insurance policies should his plans go awry, “The Iranian Assassin” is moving on undeterred by these drawbacks and host of detractors.

Hassan, 51, fought under the management of his friend, former boxing great, Ken Norton, in 1994, when he was a young man of only 37 years of age, retiring, and making his comeback in 2008. He is self-managed and holds an overall ring record of 10-0, 10 KO’s, seven of those victories, sanctioned bouts held in Mexico, coming in 2008. All ten bouts ended in resounding knockouts for the undefeated Chitsaz and encompassed only 12 rounds of fighting. He told me that he suffered a broken rib in his last bout, regrouped, and knocked the much younger man flat within the very first stanza. He presently holds the WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title and the NABA Heavyweight Championship, and has a team of advisors attempting to line up a bout with boxing legend and former multi-belt heavyweight title-holder, Evander Holyfield or anyone with solid credentials. The Assassin is ready!

Standing at 5’11 and weighing 228 pounds, Hassan claims to be in the best shape and condition of his life. Having thirty years of experience in security, protecting politicians, and entertainers, such as Hall of Fame singer, Stevie Wonder, he has helped support his family in Iran and says his future is bright. He is doing this for him and anyone that thinks age means they can no longer accomplish demanding goals. If energy and confidence have a valid place in our reasoning, Hassan has a sluggers chance to make a difference. It was thoroughly enjoyable to sit down with this young man and discuss his present and future plans.

DH: When did you get into boxing originally?

In Iran, I was an amateur fighter.

DH: How old were you at that time?

15 years old.

DH: Did you ever turn pro when you were younger?

No, Iran does not have professional boxing. I fought there for three years and came to America when I was 19 years old.

DH: Did you continue boxing when you came to America?

I did Martial Arts, then in 1990, I turned pro in California…I was approved with the Athletic Commission and turned pro. I fought for a few years, went to a boxing camp in Texas. At that time, I was managed by Ken Norton, the former Heavyweight Champ. I had three fights, three knockouts and after that, I came back to California to renew my license. Some personal stuff happened and I didn’t go back to boxing. I stayed here and went back to school, graduated from Irvine Valley College in Irvine, California. After that, I was doing my bodyguard work. I did that for 30 years.

DH: Can you name some of your clients?

Some of them I can, some I cannot. There were many singers like Stevie Wonder and diplomats, dignitaries, and politicians. I worked special functions, like award shows and such.

DH: You did that for thirty years?

I am still doing that. Then I joined the World Hall of Fame Boxing two years ago and then I was an honorary member, then they selected me to the Board of Directors, then Sergeant of Arms, then last year they nominated me as the Ambassador to the World Hall of Fame Boxing.

DH: I am confused, from security work you simply decided to join the HOF? Why did you make that transition?

I loved to be in the boxing business…I wanted to go back to fighting again.

DH: Have you always loved boxing?

Yes, I love boxing. I have always supported a lot of fighters. That was my bliss, always fighting.

DH: Are you still in contact with Ken Norton?

Yes, he is my best good friend.

DH: I know he had a stroke, how is he doing now?

He’s fine, he had another stroke recently, but he came back right now.

DH: I’m glad to hear he is recovering. When did you start fighting professionally again?

Just last year. I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life. You know you go up and down in life…I had to support my family back home in Iran, so I didn’t have chances. Since I joined the HOF, I just decided to go back to boxing. I’ve always been training, always and last year I lost 50 pounds, had 10 fights, 10 quick knockouts. I got two championships, on October 5th, 2008, I had WBA Championship and on December 20, 2008, I fought again and won the NABA Title. So I motivate myself and I’m going to keep going for more and more and more coming.

DH: So, are you licensed to box in the US now?

No, but I’m going to get it. I am licensed in Mexico, but I’m going to fight in the United States…I’m going to be a champion.

DH: What is your fighting weight?

Right now, I am at 228. I was 276 last year and I lost 50 pounds. I never felt stronger than I do right now. I’ve never been stronger ever.

DH: And your goal is to become a world champion?

I’m going to get it. You believe it, you achieve it. And I want to help everybody, all these kids…I want to be a role model for all of them. People all over the world, I mean age is a number, if you want it, you can do it. I want to open a charity and help everyone. If anyone has the opportunity, but they don’t have the money, I’m fighting for those people. I’m a people’s fighter.

DH: Are the paychecks getting better as you acquire these championships?

Yes. Everybody I fight, nobody is my age…most people I fight are 26 or 27 and all of them were first round knockouts.

DH: Have you fought any rated fighters?

Mario Maciel, 11-12-0, was a good fighter. He worked me out.

DH: How old are you right now?

I am 51 and he was 27.

DH: You must be in great condition, some guys at 51 have trouble crossing the street.

You have to be always in shape, you have to believe in yourself, you have to train. You have to always be in training, you have to always feel like you’re going to fight the next day. You have to be in that kind of shape.

DH: You mentioned working on a fight with Evander Holyfield, when is that going to be?

That’s my goal, to fight Evander. They are working on it.

DH: Who is your manager?

I have a few people but I don’t want to call their names because I’m hoping to sign with them. They are working on some big fights for me. I am presently self-managed. Maybe I can get Ken Norton to come back to help me.

DH: I understand that you have aspirations of becoming an actor, is that correct?

I want to be in the movie business also.

DH: What would you like to do in the movies?

I would like to do movies that make common sense…I could be a justice man. Bringing justice to the people, that’s what I’d like to do.

DH: How do you feel about the new President of the United States?

Mr. Obama, I love Mr. Obama. In fact, I want to change my name to Obama, because I like him very much. He’s outgoing, however he feels he says, and he’s a straight shooter, that’s what I like. That’s how I am, If I like, I like. If I don’t like, I don’t like.

That has always been my principle, you have to be an outgoing person, and you have to be in charge. You must always be in charge, I’m the leader, and I’m a commander. I have always felt that way, I’m a self-made man.

When you are a self-made person, you believe in yourself and someone like me, we never had a chance and now it’s a second chance. If I make a mistake, I will not have a second chance, I cannot make a mistake, I must move to the next level. If you make yourself, you don’t have room for mistakes. I don’t believe I’ll get a second chance. I have to do this, one time good, and go forward. If I do good, good for me, if I do bad, I will pay for it. I have to do all good. Good, good!

Time is limited and precious, there is no tomorrow, it’s right now! Whatever you want out of life, all this energy, is already here. You just have to make the choice, if you want it, you can have it. The choice is yours, don’t blame other people.

DH: Do you have children Hassan?

No I am single, I’ve always been single, my mission is pretty hard, I have to concentrate on what I’m doing.

DH: How many people do you support in Iran?

Eight or nine people, for many years. My career was delayed, I should have done this a long time ago, but I made my family happy. I lost my Dad in 1990 and the whole family was on my head. The responsibility came to me and that’s why all my plans were delayed. But, it’s never too late. Anytime you go to the ocean, you can catch your first fish.

DH: I wish you well in achieving your goals and maintaining your health.

Thank you very much. It wasn’t easy, sometimes it was hard, but life has been worth all the sacrifice.

Hassan Chitsaz
Nickname: “The Iranian Assassin”
Division: Heavyweight
Professional Record: 10-0, 10 KO’s

Date Opponent W-L-D Location Result

1994-03-17 Ron McGowan 3-8-0 Biloxi, USA W TKO 2
1994-03-27 Don Goodwin 0-1-0 Tulsa, USA W KO 1
1994-04-16 Andrew Wade 0-0-0 Moore, USA W TKO 1

2008-02-22 Gabriel Godinez 0-0-0 Hermosillo, Mexico W KO 1
2008-03-09 Luis Enrique Ochoa 0-0-0 Ensenada, Mexico W KO 1
2008-05-30 David Ramos 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W TKO 2
2008-10-18 Luis Orrantia 0-18-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
2008-10-25 Frank Morales 0-2-0 Juan Jose Rios, Mexico W KO 1
WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title
2008-12-12 Antonio Aguilera 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W KO 1
2008-12-20 Mario Maciel 11-12-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
vacant WBA NABA Mexico Heavyweight Title
Last edited by kikibalt on 23 Feb 2009, 19:22, edited 1 time in total.

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 19:22

kikibalt wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:
scartissue wrote:I understand, Frank. I was a guy who promoters liked to warm-up a crowd. I fought hard and the fans enjoyed themselves as they prepared to watch guys like Mando Ramos, Raul Rojas, Ruben Navarro, Jose Napoles, Ken Buchanan, Emile Griffith, Mando Muniz, Ken Norton, etc. Both Parnassus and Aileen Eaton used me on some major cards, and there was a reason for that. I never laid down and on a good night I might score an upset. I have no illusions about who I was or what I did. I got out of boxing what I put into it, and a helluva lot more in years to pass. So when you hear me say, "I think I could have beaten somebody", I'm neither attempting to put down a boxer or put myself up. I learned many years before I turned pro that I had the ability to upset a guy whom others might think were better (and both Claud Durden and Andy Price would have to agree.) By the way, I spoke with Andy Price recently, and he is a class act!.

-Rick Farris

Indeed he is. I sat with Andy and his wife at the very first WBHF banquet I attended. An absolute great guy. The following year I was not so fortunate. Me and Pops found ourselves sitting with Michael Buffer. Between the can-o-tan, the hair mousse and his nose in the air, I found myself looking around for Andy Price. Still laugh at my Pop's view of him. "Buffer's a bit of ja**ff, isn't he?" LOL!!!

Scartissue

Cheers to Pop Hanley :TU: Tell your dad Hi Dan.


From Andy Price to Michael Buffer! poo!!


The first year-CLASS. The second year-ASS. No room for Michael Buffers at our Boxrec tables. Just the best of our thread!

Rick

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

23 Feb 2009, 19:52

kikibalt wrote:Rick, look at this

Image
Just a Number: 51 Year Old Heavyweight Hassan Chitsaz Targets Evander Holyfield and the Heavyweight Title
Interview by Dan Hernandez-February 23, 2009

“I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life.”--Hassan Chitsaz

As the reigning elder statesman of active heavyweight fighters, Hassan E. Chitsaz is on a mission to accomplish his boxing dream and becoming the first man of Iranian decent to become a professional heavyweight champion of the world. Knowing the odds against his success, including obtaining the necessary license to fight in the United States and the inability to obtain insurance policies should his plans go awry, “The Iranian Assassin” is moving on undeterred by these drawbacks and host of detractors.

Hassan, 51, fought under the management of his friend, former boxing great, Ken Norton, in 1994, when he was a young man of only 37 years of age, retiring, and making his comeback in 2008. He is self-managed and holds an overall ring record of 10-0, 10 KO’s, seven of those victories, sanctioned bouts held in Mexico, coming in 2008. All ten bouts ended in resounding knockouts for the undefeated Chitsaz and encompassed only 12 rounds of fighting. He told me that he suffered a broken rib in his last bout, regrouped, and knocked the much younger man flat within the very first stanza. He presently holds the WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title and the NABA Heavyweight Championship, and has a team of advisors attempting to line up a bout with boxing legend and former multi-belt heavyweight title-holder, Evander Holyfield or anyone with solid credentials. The Assassin is ready!

Standing at 5’11 and weighing 228 pounds, Hassan claims to be in the best shape and condition of his life. Having thirty years of experience in security, protecting politicians, and entertainers, such as Hall of Fame singer, Stevie Wonder, he has helped support his family in Iran and says his future is bright. He is doing this for him and anyone that thinks age means they can no longer accomplish demanding goals. If energy and confidence have a valid place in our reasoning, Hassan has a sluggers chance to make a difference. It was thoroughly enjoyable to sit down with this young man and discuss his present and future plans.

DH: When did you get into boxing originally?

In Iran, I was an amateur fighter.

DH: How old were you at that time?

15 years old.

DH: Did you ever turn pro when you were younger?

No, Iran does not have professional boxing. I fought there for three years and came to America when I was 19 years old.

DH: Did you continue boxing when you came to America?

I did Martial Arts, then in 1990, I turned pro in California…I was approved with the Athletic Commission and turned pro. I fought for a few years, went to a boxing camp in Texas. At that time, I was managed by Ken Norton, the former Heavyweight Champ. I had three fights, three knockouts and after that, I came back to California to renew my license. Some personal stuff happened and I didn’t go back to boxing. I stayed here and went back to school, graduated from Irvine Valley College in Irvine, California. After that, I was doing my bodyguard work. I did that for 30 years.

DH: Can you name some of your clients?

Some of them I can, some I cannot. There were many singers like Stevie Wonder and diplomats, dignitaries, and politicians. I worked special functions, like award shows and such.

DH: You did that for thirty years?

I am still doing that. Then I joined the World Hall of Fame Boxing two years ago and then I was an honorary member, then they selected me to the Board of Directors, then Sergeant of Arms, then last year they nominated me as the Ambassador to the World Hall of Fame Boxing.

DH: I am confused, from security work you simply decided to join the HOF? Why did you make that transition?

I loved to be in the boxing business…I wanted to go back to fighting again.

DH: Have you always loved boxing?

Yes, I love boxing. I have always supported a lot of fighters. That was my bliss, always fighting.

DH: Are you still in contact with Ken Norton?

Yes, he is my best good friend.

DH: I know he had a stroke, how is he doing now?

He’s fine, he had another stroke recently, but he came back right now.

DH: I’m glad to hear he is recovering. When did you start fighting professionally again?

Just last year. I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life. You know you go up and down in life…I had to support my family back home in Iran, so I didn’t have chances. Since I joined the HOF, I just decided to go back to boxing. I’ve always been training, always and last year I lost 50 pounds, had 10 fights, 10 quick knockouts. I got two championships, on October 5th, 2008, I had WBA Championship and on December 20, 2008, I fought again and won the NABA Title. So I motivate myself and I’m going to keep going for more and more and more coming.

DH: So, are you licensed to box in the US now?

No, but I’m going to get it. I am licensed in Mexico, but I’m going to fight in the United States…I’m going to be a champion.

DH: What is your fighting weight?

Right now, I am at 228. I was 276 last year and I lost 50 pounds. I never felt stronger than I do right now. I’ve never been stronger ever.

DH: And your goal is to become a world champion?

I’m going to get it. You believe it, you achieve it. And I want to help everybody, all these kids…I want to be a role model for all of them. People all over the world, I mean age is a number, if you want it, you can do it. I want to open a charity and help everyone. If anyone has the opportunity, but they don’t have the money, I’m fighting for those people. I’m a people’s fighter.

DH: Are the paychecks getting better as you acquire these championships?

Yes. Everybody I fight, nobody is my age…most people I fight are 26 or 27 and all of them were first round knockouts.

DH: Have you fought any rated fighters?

Mario Maciel, 11-12-0, was a good fighter. He worked me out.

DH: How old are you right now?

I am 51 and he was 27.

DH: You must be in great condition, some guys at 51 have trouble crossing the street.

You have to be always in shape, you have to believe in yourself, you have to train. You have to always be in training, you have to always feel like you’re going to fight the next day. You have to be in that kind of shape.

DH: You mentioned working on a fight with Evander Holyfield, when is that going to be?

That’s my goal, to fight Evander. They are working on it.

DH: Who is your manager?

I have a few people but I don’t want to call their names because I’m hoping to sign with them. They are working on some big fights for me. I am presently self-managed. Maybe I can get Ken Norton to come back to help me.

DH: I understand that you have aspirations of becoming an actor, is that correct?

I want to be in the movie business also.

DH: What would you like to do in the movies?

I would like to do movies that make common sense…I could be a justice man. Bringing justice to the people, that’s what I’d like to do.

DH: How do you feel about the new President of the United States?

Mr. Obama, I love Mr. Obama. In fact, I want to change my name to Obama, because I like him very much. He’s outgoing, however he feels he says, and he’s a straight shooter, that’s what I like. That’s how I am, If I like, I like. If I don’t like, I don’t like.

That has always been my principle, you have to be an outgoing person, and you have to be in charge. You must always be in charge, I’m the leader, and I’m a commander. I have always felt that way, I’m a self-made man.

When you are a self-made person, you believe in yourself and someone like me, we never had a chance and now it’s a second chance. If I make a mistake, I will not have a second chance, I cannot make a mistake, I must move to the next level. If you make yourself, you don’t have room for mistakes. I don’t believe I’ll get a second chance. I have to do this, one time good, and go forward. If I do good, good for me, if I do bad, I will pay for it. I have to do all good. Good, good!

Time is limited and precious, there is no tomorrow, it’s right now! Whatever you want out of life, all this energy, is already here. You just have to make the choice, if you want it, you can have it. The choice is yours, don’t blame other people.

DH: Do you have children Hassan?

No I am single, I’ve always been single, my mission is pretty hard, I have to concentrate on what I’m doing.

DH: How many people do you support in Iran?

Eight or nine people, for many years. My career was delayed, I should have done this a long time ago, but I made my family happy. I lost my Dad in 1990 and the whole family was on my head. The responsibility came to me and that’s why all my plans were delayed. But, it’s never too late. Anytime you go to the ocean, you can catch your first fish.

DH: I wish you well in achieving your goals and maintaining your health.

Thank you very much. It wasn’t easy, sometimes it was hard, but life has been worth all the sacrifice.

Hassan Chitsaz
Nickname: “The Iranian Assassin”
Division: Heavyweight
Professional Record: 10-0, 10 KO’s

Date Opponent W-L-D Location Result

1994-03-17 Ron McGowan 3-8-0 Biloxi, USA W TKO 2
1994-03-27 Don Goodwin 0-1-0 Tulsa, USA W KO 1
1994-04-16 Andrew Wade 0-0-0 Moore, USA W TKO 1

2008-02-22 Gabriel Godinez 0-0-0 Hermosillo, Mexico W KO 1
2008-03-09 Luis Enrique Ochoa 0-0-0 Ensenada, Mexico W KO 1
2008-05-30 David Ramos 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W TKO 2
2008-10-18 Luis Orrantia 0-18-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
2008-10-25 Frank Morales 0-2-0 Juan Jose Rios, Mexico W KO 1
WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title
2008-12-12 Antonio Aguilera 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W KO 1
2008-12-20 Mario Maciel 11-12-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
vacant WBA NABA Mexico Heavyweight Title


The King of Iran . . .

I sincerely hope they match Hassan with Evander Holyfield. Then at this years WBHOF banquet, when I do the "ten count" for deceased prizefighters, I can mention his name in the same breath with "real" boxers. That's the only way I ever could.

Last summer, he told me that he had a match set for November with Vlad Klitschko in Spain. I work in the film industry, so I'm very familiar with bullshit. All I could do was pull him aside and ask, "Who do you think your talking too?", then I turned around and walked away. I grew up in the world of professional boxing from the mid-60's, and I've been involved with the media professionally for more than three decades.

He should not overmatch himself in his choice people to tell his crap too. He picks sure things in the ring, and he should avoid trying to lay a line on somebody like me. I take it as an insult. I'm not like a lot of ex-fighters. I'm not always nice to people who try to jerk me off. I'm six years older than Hassan and 75 lbs. lighter, and would gladly fight him today for a ham sandwich (you might think I'm joking, I'm not!). Dan Hanley would bust him up and make him quit, Randy would leave him for dead with his hook, Roger would flatten him with a nasty look, and if he ever saw Brian facing him from across the ring, he'd crap his oversized boxing trunks. :oo We won't even consider what would happen if he faced a Baltazar. :shame:

As I mentioned, when you work in the film world, you hear a lot of crap. To guys like Hassan I say, "Go sell your B.S. somewhere else. We're all stocked up here." :TU:

-Rick

kikibalt
Posts: 13122
Joined: 24 Oct 2005, 18:39

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

kikibalt

23 Feb 2009, 22:26

Image

dagosd2000
Posts: 5577
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 03:31
Location: san diego ca

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

dagosd2000

23 Feb 2009, 23:15

80 CENTS

"You know things are getting pretty rough for a lot of people,"I said to Barb.
"I know. People are losing their homes. Can't pay their bills."
We were eating at the table conversing about Mexico,boxing,and the economy.
"Maria,"said Gato. "You not eating?"
"Oh,I eat early. Later I eat again."
My wife was leaning up against the back of the sofa. She was listening to what we were saying. Sometimes she'd interject.
"I remember fighting in Jiquilpan,"said Gato. "I fight there seven times."
"The record book has you down for three fights,"I said.
"I fight there when I was thirteen years old. I have many fights they don't know about."

My wife was watching us talk and eat. Gato kept scooping the breaded shrimp onto his plate as did Barb. I knew my wife would come through with a good meal.
"I remember when we saw Gato's mother's house in Tijuana,"said Barb. "It had a dirt floor. I never saw poverty like I did down there."
"There's no greater contrast in borders than the U.S. and Mexico,"I said.
Gato looked up smiling while he chewed away. He had rolled his tortilla and was scooping the carne asada and shrimp onto his fork with the tortilla.
"When I win the championship I have a little money. I went to Tijuana and bought a house for my mother. I didn't want her living in that area with the prostitutes."
"Is that house you bought still there?" I asked.
"Yes"
"But it's not in your name,"said Barb. "You put it in your brother's name and it needs repairs."
"What can I do?",said Gato. "I didn't go to school. My brother could write."

My wife refilled our plates and was listening to what all was said.
"In Paderrones,"said my wife,"the teacher come once a month. I no learn too much."
Gato smiled . Before long he was engaged in conversation with my wife.
"Barb you're right about the economy. It's getting real bad."
"Gato's manager took advantage of him."
"The one before Jackie McCoy?"
"Yes,he kept taking his money. Said Gato owed it to him."
"He fought one time up here for 27 dollars."
"Really?"
"And then Gato signed his car over to him."
Gato stopped talking to my wife.
"What can I do?"I was illegal."Besides he got mad when I sign with McCoy."

Gato got to talking to my wife again. I couldn't understand the conversation,but they were both laughing.
"Barb,in Mexico if someone complains too much,they think they're crazy."
Gato looked our way again. He laughed and nodded his head.
"Roger,I remember my first pro fight in Mexico. They pay me 10 pesos."
"That's 80 cents."
"Yes,but what can I do?",Gato said smiling.

Image
Last edited by dagosd2000 on 23 Feb 2009, 23:27, edited 1 time in total.

dagosd2000
Posts: 5577
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 03:31
Location: san diego ca

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

dagosd2000

23 Feb 2009, 23:25

Rick Farris wrote:
kikibalt wrote:Rick, look at this

Image
Just a Number: 51 Year Old Heavyweight Hassan Chitsaz Targets Evander Holyfield and the Heavyweight Title
Interview by Dan Hernandez-February 23, 2009

“I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life.”--Hassan Chitsaz

As the reigning elder statesman of active heavyweight fighters, Hassan E. Chitsaz is on a mission to accomplish his boxing dream and becoming the first man of Iranian decent to become a professional heavyweight champion of the world. Knowing the odds against his success, including obtaining the necessary license to fight in the United States and the inability to obtain insurance policies should his plans go awry, “The Iranian Assassin” is moving on undeterred by these drawbacks and host of detractors.

Hassan, 51, fought under the management of his friend, former boxing great, Ken Norton, in 1994, when he was a young man of only 37 years of age, retiring, and making his comeback in 2008. He is self-managed and holds an overall ring record of 10-0, 10 KO’s, seven of those victories, sanctioned bouts held in Mexico, coming in 2008. All ten bouts ended in resounding knockouts for the undefeated Chitsaz and encompassed only 12 rounds of fighting. He told me that he suffered a broken rib in his last bout, regrouped, and knocked the much younger man flat within the very first stanza. He presently holds the WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title and the NABA Heavyweight Championship, and has a team of advisors attempting to line up a bout with boxing legend and former multi-belt heavyweight title-holder, Evander Holyfield or anyone with solid credentials. The Assassin is ready!

Standing at 5’11 and weighing 228 pounds, Hassan claims to be in the best shape and condition of his life. Having thirty years of experience in security, protecting politicians, and entertainers, such as Hall of Fame singer, Stevie Wonder, he has helped support his family in Iran and says his future is bright. He is doing this for him and anyone that thinks age means they can no longer accomplish demanding goals. If energy and confidence have a valid place in our reasoning, Hassan has a sluggers chance to make a difference. It was thoroughly enjoyable to sit down with this young man and discuss his present and future plans.

DH: When did you get into boxing originally?

In Iran, I was an amateur fighter.

DH: How old were you at that time?

15 years old.

DH: Did you ever turn pro when you were younger?

No, Iran does not have professional boxing. I fought there for three years and came to America when I was 19 years old.

DH: Did you continue boxing when you came to America?

I did Martial Arts, then in 1990, I turned pro in California…I was approved with the Athletic Commission and turned pro. I fought for a few years, went to a boxing camp in Texas. At that time, I was managed by Ken Norton, the former Heavyweight Champ. I had three fights, three knockouts and after that, I came back to California to renew my license. Some personal stuff happened and I didn’t go back to boxing. I stayed here and went back to school, graduated from Irvine Valley College in Irvine, California. After that, I was doing my bodyguard work. I did that for 30 years.

DH: Can you name some of your clients?

Some of them I can, some I cannot. There were many singers like Stevie Wonder and diplomats, dignitaries, and politicians. I worked special functions, like award shows and such.

DH: You did that for thirty years?

I am still doing that. Then I joined the World Hall of Fame Boxing two years ago and then I was an honorary member, then they selected me to the Board of Directors, then Sergeant of Arms, then last year they nominated me as the Ambassador to the World Hall of Fame Boxing.

DH: I am confused, from security work you simply decided to join the HOF? Why did you make that transition?

I loved to be in the boxing business…I wanted to go back to fighting again.

DH: Have you always loved boxing?

Yes, I love boxing. I have always supported a lot of fighters. That was my bliss, always fighting.

DH: Are you still in contact with Ken Norton?

Yes, he is my best good friend.

DH: I know he had a stroke, how is he doing now?

He’s fine, he had another stroke recently, but he came back right now.

DH: I’m glad to hear he is recovering. When did you start fighting professionally again?

Just last year. I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life. You know you go up and down in life…I had to support my family back home in Iran, so I didn’t have chances. Since I joined the HOF, I just decided to go back to boxing. I’ve always been training, always and last year I lost 50 pounds, had 10 fights, 10 quick knockouts. I got two championships, on October 5th, 2008, I had WBA Championship and on December 20, 2008, I fought again and won the NABA Title. So I motivate myself and I’m going to keep going for more and more and more coming.

DH: So, are you licensed to box in the US now?

No, but I’m going to get it. I am licensed in Mexico, but I’m going to fight in the United States…I’m going to be a champion.

DH: What is your fighting weight?

Right now, I am at 228. I was 276 last year and I lost 50 pounds. I never felt stronger than I do right now. I’ve never been stronger ever.

DH: And your goal is to become a world champion?

I’m going to get it. You believe it, you achieve it. And I want to help everybody, all these kids…I want to be a role model for all of them. People all over the world, I mean age is a number, if you want it, you can do it. I want to open a charity and help everyone. If anyone has the opportunity, but they don’t have the money, I’m fighting for those people. I’m a people’s fighter.

DH: Are the paychecks getting better as you acquire these championships?

Yes. Everybody I fight, nobody is my age…most people I fight are 26 or 27 and all of them were first round knockouts.

DH: Have you fought any rated fighters?

Mario Maciel, 11-12-0, was a good fighter. He worked me out.

DH: How old are you right now?

I am 51 and he was 27.

DH: You must be in great condition, some guys at 51 have trouble crossing the street.

You have to be always in shape, you have to believe in yourself, you have to train. You have to always be in training, you have to always feel like you’re going to fight the next day. You have to be in that kind of shape.

DH: You mentioned working on a fight with Evander Holyfield, when is that going to be?

That’s my goal, to fight Evander. They are working on it.

DH: Who is your manager?

I have a few people but I don’t want to call their names because I’m hoping to sign with them. They are working on some big fights for me. I am presently self-managed. Maybe I can get Ken Norton to come back to help me.

DH: I understand that you have aspirations of becoming an actor, is that correct?

I want to be in the movie business also.

DH: What would you like to do in the movies?

I would like to do movies that make common sense…I could be a justice man. Bringing justice to the people, that’s what I’d like to do.

DH: How do you feel about the new President of the United States?

Mr. Obama, I love Mr. Obama. In fact, I want to change my name to Obama, because I like him very much. He’s outgoing, however he feels he says, and he’s a straight shooter, that’s what I like. That’s how I am, If I like, I like. If I don’t like, I don’t like.

That has always been my principle, you have to be an outgoing person, and you have to be in charge. You must always be in charge, I’m the leader, and I’m a commander. I have always felt that way, I’m a self-made man.

When you are a self-made person, you believe in yourself and someone like me, we never had a chance and now it’s a second chance. If I make a mistake, I will not have a second chance, I cannot make a mistake, I must move to the next level. If you make yourself, you don’t have room for mistakes. I don’t believe I’ll get a second chance. I have to do this, one time good, and go forward. If I do good, good for me, if I do bad, I will pay for it. I have to do all good. Good, good!

Time is limited and precious, there is no tomorrow, it’s right now! Whatever you want out of life, all this energy, is already here. You just have to make the choice, if you want it, you can have it. The choice is yours, don’t blame other people.

DH: Do you have children Hassan?

No I am single, I’ve always been single, my mission is pretty hard, I have to concentrate on what I’m doing.

DH: How many people do you support in Iran?

Eight or nine people, for many years. My career was delayed, I should have done this a long time ago, but I made my family happy. I lost my Dad in 1990 and the whole family was on my head. The responsibility came to me and that’s why all my plans were delayed. But, it’s never too late. Anytime you go to the ocean, you can catch your first fish.

DH: I wish you well in achieving your goals and maintaining your health.

Thank you very much. It wasn’t easy, sometimes it was hard, but life has been worth all the sacrifice.

Hassan Chitsaz
Nickname: “The Iranian Assassin”
Division: Heavyweight
Professional Record: 10-0, 10 KO’s

Date Opponent W-L-D Location Result

1994-03-17 Ron McGowan 3-8-0 Biloxi, USA W TKO 2
1994-03-27 Don Goodwin 0-1-0 Tulsa, USA W KO 1
1994-04-16 Andrew Wade 0-0-0 Moore, USA W TKO 1

2008-02-22 Gabriel Godinez 0-0-0 Hermosillo, Mexico W KO 1
2008-03-09 Luis Enrique Ochoa 0-0-0 Ensenada, Mexico W KO 1
2008-05-30 David Ramos 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W TKO 2
2008-10-18 Luis Orrantia 0-18-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
2008-10-25 Frank Morales 0-2-0 Juan Jose Rios, Mexico W KO 1
WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title
2008-12-12 Antonio Aguilera 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W KO 1
2008-12-20 Mario Maciel 11-12-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
vacant WBA NABA Mexico Heavyweight Title


The King of Iran . . .

I sincerely hope they match Hassan with Evander Holyfield. Then at this years WBHOF banquet, when I do the "ten count" for deceased prizefighters, I can mention his name in the same breath with "real" boxers. That's the only way I ever could.

Last summer, he told me that he had a match set for November with Vlad Klitschko in Spain. I work in the film industry, so I'm very familiar with bullshit. All I could do was pull him aside and ask, "Who do you think your talking too?", then I turned around and walked away. I grew up in the world of professional boxing from the mid-60's, and I've been involved with the media professionally for more than three decades.

He should not overmatch himself in his choice people to tell his crap too. He picks sure things in the ring, and he should avoid trying to lay a line on somebody like me. I take it as an insult. I'm not like a lot of ex-fighters. I'm not always nice to people who try to jerk me off. I'm six years older than Hassan and 75 lbs. lighter, and would gladly fight him today for a ham sandwich (you might think I'm joking, I'm not!). Dan Hanley would bust him up and make him quit, Randy would leave him for dead with his hook, Roger would flatten him with a nasty look, and if he ever saw Brian facing him from across the ring, he'd crap his oversized boxing trunks. :oo We won't even consider what would happen if he faced a Baltazar. :shame:

As I mentioned, when you work in the film world, you hear a lot of crap. To guys like Hassan I say, "Go sell your B.S. somewhere else. We're all stocked up here." :TU:

-Rick



Guys,
Better yet we'll put him in there with Brian when he comes to San Diego.RIP :D

dagosd2000
Posts: 5577
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 03:31
Location: san diego ca

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

dagosd2000

23 Feb 2009, 23:47

Dan
Say hello to Pops for me. He's one of a kind. Broke the mold. Like old timers like that. :TU:

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

24 Feb 2009, 00:06

kikibalt wrote:Rick, look at this

Image
Just a Number: 51 Year Old Heavyweight Hassan Chitsaz Targets Evander Holyfield and the Heavyweight Title
Interview by Dan Hernandez-February 23, 2009

“I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life.”--Hassan Chitsaz

As the reigning elder statesman of active heavyweight fighters, Hassan E. Chitsaz is on a mission to accomplish his boxing dream and becoming the first man of Iranian decent to become a professional heavyweight champion of the world. Knowing the odds against his success, including obtaining the necessary license to fight in the United States and the inability to obtain insurance policies should his plans go awry, “The Iranian Assassin” is moving on undeterred by these drawbacks and host of detractors.

Hassan, 51, fought under the management of his friend, former boxing great, Ken Norton, in 1994, when he was a young man of only 37 years of age, retiring, and making his comeback in 2008. He is self-managed and holds an overall ring record of 10-0, 10 KO’s, seven of those victories, sanctioned bouts held in Mexico, coming in 2008. All ten bouts ended in resounding knockouts for the undefeated Chitsaz and encompassed only 12 rounds of fighting. He told me that he suffered a broken rib in his last bout, regrouped, and knocked the much younger man flat within the very first stanza. He presently holds the WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title and the NABA Heavyweight Championship, and has a team of advisors attempting to line up a bout with boxing legend and former multi-belt heavyweight title-holder, Evander Holyfield or anyone with solid credentials. The Assassin is ready!

Standing at 5’11 and weighing 228 pounds, Hassan claims to be in the best shape and condition of his life. Having thirty years of experience in security, protecting politicians, and entertainers, such as Hall of Fame singer, Stevie Wonder, he has helped support his family in Iran and says his future is bright. He is doing this for him and anyone that thinks age means they can no longer accomplish demanding goals. If energy and confidence have a valid place in our reasoning, Hassan has a sluggers chance to make a difference. It was thoroughly enjoyable to sit down with this young man and discuss his present and future plans.

DH: When did you get into boxing originally?

In Iran, I was an amateur fighter.

DH: How old were you at that time?

15 years old.

DH: Did you ever turn pro when you were younger?

No, Iran does not have professional boxing. I fought there for three years and came to America when I was 19 years old.

DH: Did you continue boxing when you came to America?

I did Martial Arts, then in 1990, I turned pro in California…I was approved with the Athletic Commission and turned pro. I fought for a few years, went to a boxing camp in Texas. At that time, I was managed by Ken Norton, the former Heavyweight Champ. I had three fights, three knockouts and after that, I came back to California to renew my license. Some personal stuff happened and I didn’t go back to boxing. I stayed here and went back to school, graduated from Irvine Valley College in Irvine, California. After that, I was doing my bodyguard work. I did that for 30 years.

DH: Can you name some of your clients?

Some of them I can, some I cannot. There were many singers like Stevie Wonder and diplomats, dignitaries, and politicians. I worked special functions, like award shows and such.

DH: You did that for thirty years?

I am still doing that. Then I joined the World Hall of Fame Boxing two years ago and then I was an honorary member, then they selected me to the Board of Directors, then Sergeant of Arms, then last year they nominated me as the Ambassador to the World Hall of Fame Boxing.

DH: I am confused, from security work you simply decided to join the HOF? Why did you make that transition?

I loved to be in the boxing business…I wanted to go back to fighting again.

DH: Have you always loved boxing?

Yes, I love boxing. I have always supported a lot of fighters. That was my bliss, always fighting.

DH: Are you still in contact with Ken Norton?

Yes, he is my best good friend.

DH: I know he had a stroke, how is he doing now?

He’s fine, he had another stroke recently, but he came back right now.

DH: I’m glad to hear he is recovering. When did you start fighting professionally again?

Just last year. I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life. You know you go up and down in life…I had to support my family back home in Iran, so I didn’t have chances. Since I joined the HOF, I just decided to go back to boxing. I’ve always been training, always and last year I lost 50 pounds, had 10 fights, 10 quick knockouts. I got two championships, on October 5th, 2008, I had WBA Championship and on December 20, 2008, I fought again and won the NABA Title. So I motivate myself and I’m going to keep going for more and more and more coming.

DH: So, are you licensed to box in the US now?

No, but I’m going to get it. I am licensed in Mexico, but I’m going to fight in the United States…I’m going to be a champion.

DH: What is your fighting weight?

Right now, I am at 228. I was 276 last year and I lost 50 pounds. I never felt stronger than I do right now. I’ve never been stronger ever.

DH: And your goal is to become a world champion?

I’m going to get it. You believe it, you achieve it. And I want to help everybody, all these kids…I want to be a role model for all of them. People all over the world, I mean age is a number, if you want it, you can do it. I want to open a charity and help everyone. If anyone has the opportunity, but they don’t have the money, I’m fighting for those people. I’m a people’s fighter.

DH: Are the paychecks getting better as you acquire these championships?

Yes. Everybody I fight, nobody is my age…most people I fight are 26 or 27 and all of them were first round knockouts.

DH: Have you fought any rated fighters?

Mario Maciel, 11-12-0, was a good fighter. He worked me out.

DH: How old are you right now?

I am 51 and he was 27.

DH: You must be in great condition, some guys at 51 have trouble crossing the street.

You have to be always in shape, you have to believe in yourself, you have to train. You have to always be in training, you have to always feel like you’re going to fight the next day. You have to be in that kind of shape.

DH: You mentioned working on a fight with Evander Holyfield, when is that going to be?

That’s my goal, to fight Evander. They are working on it.

DH: Who is your manager?

I have a few people but I don’t want to call their names because I’m hoping to sign with them. They are working on some big fights for me. I am presently self-managed. Maybe I can get Ken Norton to come back to help me.

DH: I understand that you have aspirations of becoming an actor, is that correct?

I want to be in the movie business also.

DH: What would you like to do in the movies?

I would like to do movies that make common sense…I could be a justice man. Bringing justice to the people, that’s what I’d like to do.

DH: How do you feel about the new President of the United States?

Mr. Obama, I love Mr. Obama. In fact, I want to change my name to Obama, because I like him very much. He’s outgoing, however he feels he says, and he’s a straight shooter, that’s what I like. That’s how I am, If I like, I like. If I don’t like, I don’t like.

That has always been my principle, you have to be an outgoing person, and you have to be in charge. You must always be in charge, I’m the leader, and I’m a commander. I have always felt that way, I’m a self-made man.

When you are a self-made person, you believe in yourself and someone like me, we never had a chance and now it’s a second chance. If I make a mistake, I will not have a second chance, I cannot make a mistake, I must move to the next level. If you make yourself, you don’t have room for mistakes. I don’t believe I’ll get a second chance. I have to do this, one time good, and go forward. If I do good, good for me, if I do bad, I will pay for it. I have to do all good. Good, good!

Time is limited and precious, there is no tomorrow, it’s right now! Whatever you want out of life, all this energy, is already here. You just have to make the choice, if you want it, you can have it. The choice is yours, don’t blame other people.

DH: Do you have children Hassan?

No I am single, I’ve always been single, my mission is pretty hard, I have to concentrate on what I’m doing.

DH: How many people do you support in Iran?

Eight or nine people, for many years. My career was delayed, I should have done this a long time ago, but I made my family happy. I lost my Dad in 1990 and the whole family was on my head. The responsibility came to me and that’s why all my plans were delayed. But, it’s never too late. Anytime you go to the ocean, you can catch your first fish.

DH: I wish you well in achieving your goals and maintaining your health.

Thank you very much. It wasn’t easy, sometimes it was hard, but life has been worth all the sacrifice.

Hassan Chitsaz
Nickname: “The Iranian Assassin”
Division: Heavyweight
Professional Record: 10-0, 10 KO’s

Date Opponent W-L-D Location Result

1994-03-17 Ron McGowan 3-8-0 Biloxi, USA W TKO 2
1994-03-27 Don Goodwin 0-1-0 Tulsa, USA W KO 1
1994-04-16 Andrew Wade 0-0-0 Moore, USA W TKO 1

2008-02-22 Gabriel Godinez 0-0-0 Hermosillo, Mexico W KO 1
2008-03-09 Luis Enrique Ochoa 0-0-0 Ensenada, Mexico W KO 1
2008-05-30 David Ramos 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W TKO 2
2008-10-18 Luis Orrantia 0-18-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
2008-10-25 Frank Morales 0-2-0 Juan Jose Rios, Mexico W KO 1
WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title
2008-12-12 Antonio Aguilera 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W KO 1
2008-12-20 Mario Maciel 11-12-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
vacant WBA NABA Mexico Heavyweight Title



Making dreams come true . . .

This reminds me of a story that I know to be true. There was a point in Mike Quarry's career, where he fought in Florida. There was no real athletic commission. Mike had a sparring partner, and the two would fight each other three times in sanctioned boxing matches. Three fights, three different cities, three different names used by the sparring partner.

Three wins for Mike Quarry. It's not all that uncommon in boxing. Of course, I doubt anything so dishonest could happen in a place like Mexico? :DDD


-Rick

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

24 Feb 2009, 00:21

dagosd2000 wrote:
Rick Farris wrote:
kikibalt wrote:Rick, look at this

Image
Just a Number: 51 Year Old Heavyweight Hassan Chitsaz Targets Evander Holyfield and the Heavyweight Title
Interview by Dan Hernandez-February 23, 2009

“I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life.”--Hassan Chitsaz

As the reigning elder statesman of active heavyweight fighters, Hassan E. Chitsaz is on a mission to accomplish his boxing dream and becoming the first man of Iranian decent to become a professional heavyweight champion of the world. Knowing the odds against his success, including obtaining the necessary license to fight in the United States and the inability to obtain insurance policies should his plans go awry, “The Iranian Assassin” is moving on undeterred by these drawbacks and host of detractors.

Hassan, 51, fought under the management of his friend, former boxing great, Ken Norton, in 1994, when he was a young man of only 37 years of age, retiring, and making his comeback in 2008. He is self-managed and holds an overall ring record of 10-0, 10 KO’s, seven of those victories, sanctioned bouts held in Mexico, coming in 2008. All ten bouts ended in resounding knockouts for the undefeated Chitsaz and encompassed only 12 rounds of fighting. He told me that he suffered a broken rib in his last bout, regrouped, and knocked the much younger man flat within the very first stanza. He presently holds the WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title and the NABA Heavyweight Championship, and has a team of advisors attempting to line up a bout with boxing legend and former multi-belt heavyweight title-holder, Evander Holyfield or anyone with solid credentials. The Assassin is ready!

Standing at 5’11 and weighing 228 pounds, Hassan claims to be in the best shape and condition of his life. Having thirty years of experience in security, protecting politicians, and entertainers, such as Hall of Fame singer, Stevie Wonder, he has helped support his family in Iran and says his future is bright. He is doing this for him and anyone that thinks age means they can no longer accomplish demanding goals. If energy and confidence have a valid place in our reasoning, Hassan has a sluggers chance to make a difference. It was thoroughly enjoyable to sit down with this young man and discuss his present and future plans.

DH: When did you get into boxing originally?

In Iran, I was an amateur fighter.

DH: How old were you at that time?

15 years old.

DH: Did you ever turn pro when you were younger?

No, Iran does not have professional boxing. I fought there for three years and came to America when I was 19 years old.

DH: Did you continue boxing when you came to America?

I did Martial Arts, then in 1990, I turned pro in California…I was approved with the Athletic Commission and turned pro. I fought for a few years, went to a boxing camp in Texas. At that time, I was managed by Ken Norton, the former Heavyweight Champ. I had three fights, three knockouts and after that, I came back to California to renew my license. Some personal stuff happened and I didn’t go back to boxing. I stayed here and went back to school, graduated from Irvine Valley College in Irvine, California. After that, I was doing my bodyguard work. I did that for 30 years.

DH: Can you name some of your clients?

Some of them I can, some I cannot. There were many singers like Stevie Wonder and diplomats, dignitaries, and politicians. I worked special functions, like award shows and such.

DH: You did that for thirty years?

I am still doing that. Then I joined the World Hall of Fame Boxing two years ago and then I was an honorary member, then they selected me to the Board of Directors, then Sergeant of Arms, then last year they nominated me as the Ambassador to the World Hall of Fame Boxing.

DH: I am confused, from security work you simply decided to join the HOF? Why did you make that transition?

I loved to be in the boxing business…I wanted to go back to fighting again.

DH: Have you always loved boxing?

Yes, I love boxing. I have always supported a lot of fighters. That was my bliss, always fighting.

DH: Are you still in contact with Ken Norton?

Yes, he is my best good friend.

DH: I know he had a stroke, how is he doing now?

He’s fine, he had another stroke recently, but he came back right now.

DH: I’m glad to hear he is recovering. When did you start fighting professionally again?

Just last year. I decided that age was just a number, all it takes is hard work and you can get what you want in life. You know you go up and down in life…I had to support my family back home in Iran, so I didn’t have chances. Since I joined the HOF, I just decided to go back to boxing. I’ve always been training, always and last year I lost 50 pounds, had 10 fights, 10 quick knockouts. I got two championships, on October 5th, 2008, I had WBA Championship and on December 20, 2008, I fought again and won the NABA Title. So I motivate myself and I’m going to keep going for more and more and more coming.

DH: So, are you licensed to box in the US now?

No, but I’m going to get it. I am licensed in Mexico, but I’m going to fight in the United States…I’m going to be a champion.

DH: What is your fighting weight?

Right now, I am at 228. I was 276 last year and I lost 50 pounds. I never felt stronger than I do right now. I’ve never been stronger ever.

DH: And your goal is to become a world champion?

I’m going to get it. You believe it, you achieve it. And I want to help everybody, all these kids…I want to be a role model for all of them. People all over the world, I mean age is a number, if you want it, you can do it. I want to open a charity and help everyone. If anyone has the opportunity, but they don’t have the money, I’m fighting for those people. I’m a people’s fighter.

DH: Are the paychecks getting better as you acquire these championships?

Yes. Everybody I fight, nobody is my age…most people I fight are 26 or 27 and all of them were first round knockouts.

DH: Have you fought any rated fighters?

Mario Maciel, 11-12-0, was a good fighter. He worked me out.

DH: How old are you right now?

I am 51 and he was 27.

DH: You must be in great condition, some guys at 51 have trouble crossing the street.

You have to be always in shape, you have to believe in yourself, you have to train. You have to always be in training, you have to always feel like you’re going to fight the next day. You have to be in that kind of shape.

DH: You mentioned working on a fight with Evander Holyfield, when is that going to be?

That’s my goal, to fight Evander. They are working on it.

DH: Who is your manager?

I have a few people but I don’t want to call their names because I’m hoping to sign with them. They are working on some big fights for me. I am presently self-managed. Maybe I can get Ken Norton to come back to help me.

DH: I understand that you have aspirations of becoming an actor, is that correct?

I want to be in the movie business also.

DH: What would you like to do in the movies?

I would like to do movies that make common sense…I could be a justice man. Bringing justice to the people, that’s what I’d like to do.

DH: How do you feel about the new President of the United States?

Mr. Obama, I love Mr. Obama. In fact, I want to change my name to Obama, because I like him very much. He’s outgoing, however he feels he says, and he’s a straight shooter, that’s what I like. That’s how I am, If I like, I like. If I don’t like, I don’t like.

That has always been my principle, you have to be an outgoing person, and you have to be in charge. You must always be in charge, I’m the leader, and I’m a commander. I have always felt that way, I’m a self-made man.

When you are a self-made person, you believe in yourself and someone like me, we never had a chance and now it’s a second chance. If I make a mistake, I will not have a second chance, I cannot make a mistake, I must move to the next level. If you make yourself, you don’t have room for mistakes. I don’t believe I’ll get a second chance. I have to do this, one time good, and go forward. If I do good, good for me, if I do bad, I will pay for it. I have to do all good. Good, good!

Time is limited and precious, there is no tomorrow, it’s right now! Whatever you want out of life, all this energy, is already here. You just have to make the choice, if you want it, you can have it. The choice is yours, don’t blame other people.

DH: Do you have children Hassan?

No I am single, I’ve always been single, my mission is pretty hard, I have to concentrate on what I’m doing.

DH: How many people do you support in Iran?

Eight or nine people, for many years. My career was delayed, I should have done this a long time ago, but I made my family happy. I lost my Dad in 1990 and the whole family was on my head. The responsibility came to me and that’s why all my plans were delayed. But, it’s never too late. Anytime you go to the ocean, you can catch your first fish.

DH: I wish you well in achieving your goals and maintaining your health.

Thank you very much. It wasn’t easy, sometimes it was hard, but life has been worth all the sacrifice.

Hassan Chitsaz
Nickname: “The Iranian Assassin”
Division: Heavyweight
Professional Record: 10-0, 10 KO’s

Date Opponent W-L-D Location Result

1994-03-17 Ron McGowan 3-8-0 Biloxi, USA W TKO 2
1994-03-27 Don Goodwin 0-1-0 Tulsa, USA W KO 1
1994-04-16 Andrew Wade 0-0-0 Moore, USA W TKO 1

2008-02-22 Gabriel Godinez 0-0-0 Hermosillo, Mexico W KO 1
2008-03-09 Luis Enrique Ochoa 0-0-0 Ensenada, Mexico W KO 1
2008-05-30 David Ramos 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W TKO 2
2008-10-18 Luis Orrantia 0-18-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
2008-10-25 Frank Morales 0-2-0 Juan Jose Rios, Mexico W KO 1
WBA Fedecaribe Heavyweight Title
2008-12-12 Antonio Aguilera 0-0-0 Los Mochis, Mexico W KO 1
2008-12-20 Mario Maciel 11-12-0 Guamuchil, Mexico W KO 1
vacant WBA NABA Mexico Heavyweight Title


The King of Iran . . .

I sincerely hope they match Hassan with Evander Holyfield. Then at this years WBHOF banquet, when I do the "ten count" for deceased prizefighters, I can mention his name in the same breath with "real" boxers. That's the only way I ever could.

Last summer, he told me that he had a match set for November with Vlad Klitschko in Spain. I work in the film industry, so I'm very familiar with bullshit. All I could do was pull him aside and ask, "Who do you think your talking too?", then I turned around and walked away. I grew up in the world of professional boxing from the mid-60's, and I've been involved with the media professionally for more than three decades.

He should not overmatch himself in his choice people to tell his crap too. He picks sure things in the ring, and he should avoid trying to lay a line on somebody like me. I take it as an insult. I'm not like a lot of ex-fighters. I'm not always nice to people who try to jerk me off. I'm six years older than Hassan and 75 lbs. lighter, and would gladly fight him today for a ham sandwich (you might think I'm joking, I'm not!). Dan Hanley would bust him up and make him quit, Randy would leave him for dead with his hook, Roger would flatten him with a nasty look, and if he ever saw Brian facing him from across the ring, he'd crap his oversized boxing trunks. :oo We won't even consider what would happen if he faced a Baltazar. :shame:

As I mentioned, when you work in the film world, you hear a lot of crap. To guys like Hassan I say, "Go sell your B.S. somewhere else. We're all stocked up here." :TU:

-Rick



Guys,
Better yet we'll put him in there with Brian when he comes to San Diego.RIP :D



Roger, you're a cruel man! That's like matching an Iranian high school football team with the Chicago Bears. :lol:

-Rick

Rick Farris
Posts: 7200
Joined: 15 Feb 2008, 16:04

Re: Classic American West Coast Boxing

Rick Farris

24 Feb 2009, 01:01

dagosd2000 wrote:80 CENTS

"You know things are getting pretty rough for a lot of people,"I said to Barb.
"I know. People are losing their homes. Can't pay their bills."
We were eating at the table conversing about Mexico,boxing,and the economy.
"Maria,"said Gato. "You not eating?"
"Oh,I eat early. Later I eat again."
My wife was leaning up against the back of the sofa. She was listening to what we were saying. Sometimes she'd interject.
"I remember fighting in Jiquilpan,"said Gato. "I fight there seven times."
"The record book has you down for three fights,"I said.
"I fight there when I was thirteen years old. I have many fights they don't know about."

My wife was watching us talk and eat. Gato kept scooping the breaded shrimp onto his plate as did Barb. I knew my wife would come through with a good meal.
"I remember when we saw Gato's mother's house in Tijuana,"said Barb. "It had a dirt floor. I never saw poverty like I did down there."
"There's no greater contrast in borders than the U.S. and Mexico,"I said.
Gato looked up smiling while he chewed away. He had rolled his tortilla and was scooping the carne asada and shrimp onto his fork with the tortilla.
"When I win the championship I have a little money. I went to Tijuana and bought a house for my mother. I didn't want her living in that area with the prostitutes."
"Is that house you bought still there?" I asked.
"Yes"
"But it's not in your name,"said Barb. "You put it in your brother's name and it needs repairs."
"What can I do?",said Gato. "I didn't go to school. My brother could write."

My wife refilled our plates and was listening to what all was said.
"In Paderrones,"said my wife,"the teacher come once a month. I no learn too much."
Gato smiled . Before long he was engaged in conversation with my wife.
"Barb you're right about the economy. It's getting real bad."
"Gato's manager took advantage of him."
"The one before Jackie McCoy?"
"Yes,he kept taking his money. Said Gato owed it to him."
"He fought one time up here for 27 dollars."
"Really?"
"And then Gato signed his car over to him."
Gato stopped talking to my wife.
"What can I do?"I was illegal."Besides he got mad when I sign with McCoy."

Gato got to talking to my wife again. I couldn't understand the conversation,but they were both laughing.
"Barb,in Mexico if someone complains too much,they think they're crazy."
Gato looked our way again. He laughed and nodded his head.
"Roger,I remember my first pro fight in Mexico. They pay me 10 pesos."
"That's 80 cents."
"Yes,but what can I do?",Gato said smiling.

Image


Compadres . . .
Thanks for taking us into your home, Rog.
That shrimp looks pretty good :TU:

Maria, Roger, Barb and El Gato . . . :bow:


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