Difference between revisions of "1878-08-16 (110lbs) Tommy Hawkins drew 51 (finish) Joe Fowler, Brennan’s Yard Assembly Rooms, Stepney, London, England"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
(4 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
1878-08-16 (110lbs) [[Tommy Hawkins]] drew 51 (finish) [[Joe Fowler]], [[Brennan’s Yard Assembly Rooms, Stepney, London]], England. Billed for the English 110lbs title, £25 a side, using two-ounce gloves, and fighting for the original Joe Hoiles’ Championship Belt (won in 1854), it was called a draw after three hours and 25 minutes when it was getting dark. The bout is recognised as being the longest recorded to have taken place in Europe and it is said that the two contests between Hawkins and Fowler, which were sporting but hard fought and skilful, established ‘gloved’ boxing. Although Hawkins (109) was knocked down at least twice it was once again very evenly contested. Up to the 30th round it was felt that Fowler (110) was in front, but from thereon Hawkins made up much of the leeway. Unfortunately, on 27 November, while boxing an exhibition with [[Punch Dowsett]], Fowler dislocated his right arm, the injury ultimately ending his career.  
+
1878-08-16 (110lbs) [[Tommy Hawkins]] drew 51 (finish) [[Joe Fowler]], Brennan’s Yard Assembly Rooms, Stepney, London, England. Billed for the English 110lbs title, £25-a-side, using two-ounce gloves, and fighting for the original Joe Hoiles’ Championship Belt (won in 1854), it was called a draw after three hours and 25 minutes when it was getting dark. The bout is recognised as being the longest recorded to have taken place in Europe, and it is said that the two contests between Hawkins and Fowler, which were sporting but hard fought and skilful, established ‘gloved’ boxing. Although Hawkins (109) was knocked down at least twice it was once again very evenly contested. Up to the 30th round it was felt that Fowler (110) was in front, but from there on Hawkins made up much of the leeway. Unfortunately, on 27 November, while boxing an exhibition with [[Punch Dowsett]], Fowler dislocated his right arm, the injury ultimately ending his career.  
  
Other men to claim the English title at the weight over the next few years included [[Young Smith]], [[Tommy Monk]] and [[Ted Jones]], who won a championship competition on 19 April 1885 at [[Bob Habbijam]]’s [[West-End School of Arms, St Andrew’s Hall, Westminster, London]], when outpointing [[Dave Phillips]] over three rounds, while [[George Camp]] and [[Jack Sharpe]] claimed the title in January and February 1888 respectively.
+
Other men to claim the English title at the weight over the next few years included [[Young Smith]], [[Tommy Monk]] and [[Ted Jones]], who won a championship competition on 19 April 1885 at Bob Habbijam’s West-End School of Arms, St Andrew’s Hall, Westminster, London, when outpointing [[Dave Phillips]] over three rounds, while [[George Camp]] and [[Jack Sharpe]] claimed the title in January and February 1888 respectively.
  
[[Category:1878 Bantamweight Contests]]
+
[[Category: 1878 Title Contests]]
[[Category:Bantamweight Division]]
+
[[Category: Bantamweight Division]]

Revision as of 08:49, 20 November 2012

1878-08-16 (110lbs) Tommy Hawkins drew 51 (finish) Joe Fowler, Brennan’s Yard Assembly Rooms, Stepney, London, England. Billed for the English 110lbs title, £25-a-side, using two-ounce gloves, and fighting for the original Joe Hoiles’ Championship Belt (won in 1854), it was called a draw after three hours and 25 minutes when it was getting dark. The bout is recognised as being the longest recorded to have taken place in Europe, and it is said that the two contests between Hawkins and Fowler, which were sporting but hard fought and skilful, established ‘gloved’ boxing. Although Hawkins (109) was knocked down at least twice it was once again very evenly contested. Up to the 30th round it was felt that Fowler (110) was in front, but from there on Hawkins made up much of the leeway. Unfortunately, on 27 November, while boxing an exhibition with Punch Dowsett, Fowler dislocated his right arm, the injury ultimately ending his career.

Other men to claim the English title at the weight over the next few years included Young Smith, Tommy Monk and Ted Jones, who won a championship competition on 19 April 1885 at Bob Habbijam’s West-End School of Arms, St Andrew’s Hall, Westminster, London, when outpointing Dave Phillips over three rounds, while George Camp and Jack Sharpe claimed the title in January and February 1888 respectively.