Difference between revisions of "1889-07-18 (104lbs) Tim Buckley w disq 19 (finish) Sid Phillips, South London Gym, Kennington, London, England"

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1889-07-18 (104lbs) [[Tim Buckley]] w disq 19 (finish) [[Sid Phillips]], South London Gym, Kennington, London, England. Referee: J. T. Hulls. Contested for the English 102 to 104lbs title, the fight got underway with Phillips (101), who was just 4’11½”, being warned for low blows. Following that, both Phillips and Buckley (104) were cut around their eyes in the second round, and after the latter had slipped over in the fifth, right on the call of time he was knocked down. Phillips was the stronger at this stage but Buckley was winning the rounds, having his rival all but out at the end of the 12th. Buckley’s left eye was closing fast in the 14th before he was put down twice in the 15th. By the 17th both men were tiring, resorting to wrestling, and with the referee losing his patience Phillips was eventually disqualified for throwing in the 19th.  
 
1889-07-18 (104lbs) [[Tim Buckley]] w disq 19 (finish) [[Sid Phillips]], South London Gym, Kennington, London, England. Referee: J. T. Hulls. Contested for the English 102 to 104lbs title, the fight got underway with Phillips (101), who was just 4’11½”, being warned for low blows. Following that, both Phillips and Buckley (104) were cut around their eyes in the second round, and after the latter had slipped over in the fifth, right on the call of time he was knocked down. Phillips was the stronger at this stage but Buckley was winning the rounds, having his rival all but out at the end of the 12th. Buckley’s left eye was closing fast in the 14th before he was put down twice in the 15th. By the 17th both men were tiring, resorting to wrestling, and with the referee losing his patience Phillips was eventually disqualified for throwing in the 19th.  
  
Earlier, men who claimed the English title included [[Dave Cable]] (September 1881), [[Harry Barnes]] (August 1883), [[Jim Gorrie]] and [[Young Clarke]] (September 1883), [[Steve Corbett]] (February 1884) and [[Young Billy James]] (February 1885). Two men to win championship competitions were [[Arthur Westley]] (who knocked out [[George Suttle]] inside 11 rounds on 14 December 1886 at the Saddlers Wells Theatre, Clerkenwell, London) and [[Patsy Sheehan]] (who outpointed [[Billy Plimmer]] over four rounds on 23 February 1889 at the Royal Aquarium Theatre, Westminster, London).  
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Earlier, men who claimed the English title included [[Dave Cable]] (September 1881), [[Harry Barnes]] (August 1883), [[Jim Gorrie]] and [[Young Clarke]] (September 1883), [[Steve Corbett]] (February 1884) and [[Young Billy James]] (February 1885). Two men to win championship competitions were [[Arthur Westley]] (who knocked out [[George Suttle]] inside 11 rounds at the Saddlers Wells Theatre, Clerkenwell, London on 14 December 1886) and [[Patsy Sheehan]] (who outpointed [[Billy Plimmer]] over four rounds at the Royal Aquarium Theatre, Westminster, London on 23 February 1889).  
  
Following Buckley v Phillips, championship competitions were won by [[Alf Gower]] (who outpointed Sheehan over four rounds on 7 December at the Royal Aquarium Theatre) and Westley (who knocked out Suttle on 14 December at the Saddlers Wells Theatre in the fourth round).  
+
Following Buckley v Phillips, championship competitions were won by [[Alf Gower]] (who outpointed Sheehan over four rounds at the Royal Aquarium Theatre on 7 December) and Westley (who knocked out Suttle in the fourth round at the Saddlers Wells Theatre on 14 December).  
  
 
Into 1890, [[Funny Page]] (January), Plimmer (February), [[Jack Neill]] (March), [[Mike Small]] (April), [[Alf Gunning]] (May), [[Fred Sullivan]] (August) and [[Willie Smith]] (September) challenged all England. Meanwhile, Barnes was continuing to make it clear that he was still the current champion of the weight class right through to the end of 1890.
 
Into 1890, [[Funny Page]] (January), Plimmer (February), [[Jack Neill]] (March), [[Mike Small]] (April), [[Alf Gunning]] (May), [[Fred Sullivan]] (August) and [[Willie Smith]] (September) challenged all England. Meanwhile, Barnes was continuing to make it clear that he was still the current champion of the weight class right through to the end of 1890.

Latest revision as of 11:56, 13 March 2013

1889-07-18 (104lbs) Tim Buckley w disq 19 (finish) Sid Phillips, South London Gym, Kennington, London, England. Referee: J. T. Hulls. Contested for the English 102 to 104lbs title, the fight got underway with Phillips (101), who was just 4’11½”, being warned for low blows. Following that, both Phillips and Buckley (104) were cut around their eyes in the second round, and after the latter had slipped over in the fifth, right on the call of time he was knocked down. Phillips was the stronger at this stage but Buckley was winning the rounds, having his rival all but out at the end of the 12th. Buckley’s left eye was closing fast in the 14th before he was put down twice in the 15th. By the 17th both men were tiring, resorting to wrestling, and with the referee losing his patience Phillips was eventually disqualified for throwing in the 19th.

Earlier, men who claimed the English title included Dave Cable (September 1881), Harry Barnes (August 1883), Jim Gorrie and Young Clarke (September 1883), Steve Corbett (February 1884) and Young Billy James (February 1885). Two men to win championship competitions were Arthur Westley (who knocked out George Suttle inside 11 rounds at the Saddlers Wells Theatre, Clerkenwell, London on 14 December 1886) and Patsy Sheehan (who outpointed Billy Plimmer over four rounds at the Royal Aquarium Theatre, Westminster, London on 23 February 1889).

Following Buckley v Phillips, championship competitions were won by Alf Gower (who outpointed Sheehan over four rounds at the Royal Aquarium Theatre on 7 December) and Westley (who knocked out Suttle in the fourth round at the Saddlers Wells Theatre on 14 December).

Into 1890, Funny Page (January), Plimmer (February), Jack Neill (March), Mike Small (April), Alf Gunning (May), Fred Sullivan (August) and Willie Smith (September) challenged all England. Meanwhile, Barnes was continuing to make it clear that he was still the current champion of the weight class right through to the end of 1890.