Difference between revisions of "1890-01-22 (108lbs) Charlie Mansford w co 11 (finish) Harry Saphir, Social Club, Kennington, London, England"

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22 January (108lbs) [[Charlie Mansford]] w co 11 (finish) [[Harry Saphir]], [[Social Club, Kennington, London]], England. Referee: J. O’Neill. Billed for the English 108lbs title, although Mansford was a big favourite it took him seven rounds before getting on top of Saphir, who made him work every inch of the way. Even after Saphir slipped down in the eighth and looked as though he was tiring rapidly, by the 11th he had regrouped and it was Mansford who seemed to be suffering the most. Thus it was a big surprise to all when, after several rallies, Saphir was floored before being dropped by a right to the jaw for the full count immediately on getting up.
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1890-01-22 (108lbs) [[Charlie Mansford]] w co 11 (finish) [[Harry Saphir]], Social Club, Kennington, London, England. Referee: J. O’Neill. Billed for the English 108lbs title, although Mansford was a big favourite it took him seven rounds before getting on top of Saphir, who made him work every inch of the way. Even when Saphir slipped down in the eighth and looked as though he was tiring rapidly, after he had regrouped by the 11th it was Mansford who seemed to be suffering the most. Thus, it was a big surprise to all when, after several rallies, Saphir was floored before being dropped by a right to the jaw for the full count immediately on getting up.
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[[Category: 1890 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Bantamweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Bantamweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 12:30, 13 March 2013

1890-01-22 (108lbs) Charlie Mansford w co 11 (finish) Harry Saphir, Social Club, Kennington, London, England. Referee: J. O’Neill. Billed for the English 108lbs title, although Mansford was a big favourite it took him seven rounds before getting on top of Saphir, who made him work every inch of the way. Even when Saphir slipped down in the eighth and looked as though he was tiring rapidly, after he had regrouped by the 11th it was Mansford who seemed to be suffering the most. Thus, it was a big surprise to all when, after several rallies, Saphir was floored before being dropped by a right to the jaw for the full count immediately on getting up.