Difference between revisions of "1890-09-02 (122lbs) Young Griffo w rtd 16 (finish) Torpedo Billy Murphy, York Street AC, Sydney, Australia"

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1890-09-02 (122lbs) [[Young Griffo]] w rtd 16 (finish) [[Torpedo Billy Murphy]], York Street AC, Sydney, Australia. Referee: Sid Bloomfield. Advertised as being for the 122lbs featherweight championship of the world and the ''Police Gazette'' Championship Belt, Murphy, the holder, rushed Griffo (121) at the start and although his great strength forced the latter down more than once he could not make it pay off. Displaying magnificent ring generalship, Griffo contented himself with boxing in defensive mode while at the same time sending in some heavy counters and uppercuts that drew blood from the ever-aggressive Murphy. Up until the 15th there was always a chance of Murphy, who had missed far more than he landed, finding a knockout blow but the pace had been so furious that it began to look a question of who would last the longest. Then, at the end of the 16th, Murphy just turned away, stating that the gloves had been tampered with and he was not carrying on. On close inspection nothing was found to be wrong with the gloves and it was later confirmed that Murphy had injured both hands and, on tiring, decided to retire himself before Griffo got to him.  
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1890-09-02 (122lbs) [[Young Griffo]] w rtd 16 (finish) [[Torpedo Billy Murphy]], York Street AC, Sydney, Australia. Referee: Sid Bloomfield. Advertised as being for the 122lbs featherweight championship of the world, and the ''Police Gazette'' Championship Belt, Murphy (116), the holder, rushed Griffo (121) at the start, but although his great strength forced the latter down more than once he could not make it pay off. Displaying magnificent ring generalship, Griffo contented himself with boxing in defensive mode while at the same time sending in some heavy counters and uppercuts that drew blood from the ever-aggressive Murphy. Up until the 15th there was always a chance of Murphy, who had missed far more than he landed, finding a knockout blow, but the pace had been so furious that it began to look a question of who would last the longest. Then, at the end of the 16th, Murphy just turned away, stating that the gloves had been tampered with and he was not carrying on. On close inspection when nothing was found to be wrong with the gloves it was later confirmed that Murphy had injured both hands and decided to retire himself before Griffo got to him. Earlier, he had left Griffo waiting in the ring for 40 minutes while he popped in to a local barber’s shop to have a shave.  
  
Earlier, he had left Griffo waiting in the ring for 40 minutes while he popped in to a local barber’s shop to have a shave. In the aftermath, Murphy claimed that the fight was fixed and he would be continuing to claim the 122lbs title while a fast growing Griffo stated that he would be defending the title at 126lbs in the future.
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In the aftermath, Murphy claimed that as the fight was fixed he would be continuing to claim the 122lbs title, while a fast-growing Griffo stated that he would be defending the title at 126lbs in the future.
  
 
[[Category: 1890 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1890 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 13:25, 26 March 2013

1890-09-02 (122lbs) Young Griffo w rtd 16 (finish) Torpedo Billy Murphy, York Street AC, Sydney, Australia. Referee: Sid Bloomfield. Advertised as being for the 122lbs featherweight championship of the world, and the Police Gazette Championship Belt, Murphy (116), the holder, rushed Griffo (121) at the start, but although his great strength forced the latter down more than once he could not make it pay off. Displaying magnificent ring generalship, Griffo contented himself with boxing in defensive mode while at the same time sending in some heavy counters and uppercuts that drew blood from the ever-aggressive Murphy. Up until the 15th there was always a chance of Murphy, who had missed far more than he landed, finding a knockout blow, but the pace had been so furious that it began to look a question of who would last the longest. Then, at the end of the 16th, Murphy just turned away, stating that the gloves had been tampered with and he was not carrying on. On close inspection when nothing was found to be wrong with the gloves it was later confirmed that Murphy had injured both hands and decided to retire himself before Griffo got to him. Earlier, he had left Griffo waiting in the ring for 40 minutes while he popped in to a local barber’s shop to have a shave.

In the aftermath, Murphy claimed that as the fight was fixed he would be continuing to claim the 122lbs title, while a fast-growing Griffo stated that he would be defending the title at 126lbs in the future.