Difference between revisions of "1892-05-30 Peter Jackson w rsc 10 (20) Paddy Slavin, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

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Although only billed for the championships of England and Australia, by his victory Jackson took over Slavin’s ''Police Gazette'' championship belt. Jackson’s Imperial British Empire title claim would have also been involved.  
 
Although only billed for the championships of England and Australia, by his victory Jackson took over Slavin’s ''Police Gazette'' championship belt. Jackson’s Imperial British Empire title claim would have also been involved.  
  
Unfortunately for Jackson, who was recognised as the ‘black’ champion after beating [[George Godfrey]] in 1888, Sullivan continually ignored his challenges, preferring to put up a ‘Colour Bar’ instead. Eventually, it was [[James J. Corbett]] who grasped the opportunity, while Jackson remained inactive for six years. Sadly, after returning to the ring for four more contests he fell victim to the ravages of consumption and passed away on 13 July 1901.
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Unfortunately for Jackson, who was recognised as the ‘black’ champion after beating [[George Godfrey]] in 1888, [[John L. Sullivan]] continually ignored his challenges, preferring to put up a ‘Colour Bar’ instead. Eventually, it was [[James J. Corbett]] who grasped the opportunity, while Jackson remained inactive for six years. Sadly, after returning to the ring for four more contests he fell victim to the ravages of consumption and passed away on 13 July 1901.
  
 
[[Category: 1892 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1892 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]

Revision as of 01:00, 19 March 2013

1892-05-30 Peter Jackson w rsc 10 (20) Paddy Slavin, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. It was evident after a few rounds that Slavin (185), his left eye already closed, had no chance against the bigger man but despite shipping punishment he was always trying to fight back. In the tenth, Jackson (196) went all out for the win and within two minutes of the session had forced a stoppage with a badly beaten Slavin lying helpless against the ropes.

Although only billed for the championships of England and Australia, by his victory Jackson took over Slavin’s Police Gazette championship belt. Jackson’s Imperial British Empire title claim would have also been involved.

Unfortunately for Jackson, who was recognised as the ‘black’ champion after beating George Godfrey in 1888, John L. Sullivan continually ignored his challenges, preferring to put up a ‘Colour Bar’ instead. Eventually, it was James J. Corbett who grasped the opportunity, while Jackson remained inactive for six years. Sadly, after returning to the ring for four more contests he fell victim to the ravages of consumption and passed away on 13 July 1901.