Difference between revisions of "1893-11-02 (122lbs) Ike Weir w co 6 Torpedo Billy Murphy, Cribb Club, Boston, Massachusetts, USA"

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1893-11-02 (122lbs) [[Ike Weir]] w co 6 [[Torpedo Billy Murphy]], Cribb Club, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Referee: John Eckhardt. Defending his 122lbs title claim, Weir got away to a good start and should have finished Murphy off in the fourth round after handing out terrific punishment. In the fifth, having taken two counts and bleeding badly, Murphy threw Weir to the floor several times, but continued to take severe punishment. The end finally came in the sixth after Murphy was sent crashing out of the ring following a heavy left to the head, and was counted out despite his second helping him.  
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1893-11-02 (122lbs) [[Ike Weir]] w co 6 [[Torpedo Billy Murphy]], Cribb Club, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Referee: John Eckhardt. Defending his 122lbs title claim, Weir should have finished Murphy off in the fourth round after handing out terrific punishment. In the fifth, having taken two counts and bleeding badly, Murphy, who threw Weir to the floor several times, continued to take severe punishment. The end finally came in the sixth after Murphy was sent crashing out of the ring following a heavy left to the head, being counted out despite his second helping him.  
  
 
A few days later Weir stated that [[George Dixon]] should stop calling himself the champion until he had proved himself against the best.  
 
A few days later Weir stated that [[George Dixon]] should stop calling himself the champion until he had proved himself against the best.  

Latest revision as of 09:59, 27 March 2013

1893-11-02 (122lbs) Ike Weir w co 6 Torpedo Billy Murphy, Cribb Club, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Referee: John Eckhardt. Defending his 122lbs title claim, Weir should have finished Murphy off in the fourth round after handing out terrific punishment. In the fifth, having taken two counts and bleeding badly, Murphy, who threw Weir to the floor several times, continued to take severe punishment. The end finally came in the sixth after Murphy was sent crashing out of the ring following a heavy left to the head, being counted out despite his second helping him.

A few days later Weir stated that George Dixon should stop calling himself the champion until he had proved himself against the best.

Weir’s career virtually came to an end on 17 March 1894 when Young Griffo knocked him out inside three sessions of a scheduled eight-round contest at catchweights, having been dropped at least a dozen times. A few days later the Lowell Sun commented: “Now Weir had been defeated by Griffo he would have to destroy his letter heads, which showed him to be the world champion”.

Although Weir came back for just one losing fight in 1898 he quickly retired again before passing away on 12 September 1908.