1894-05-07 (118/120lbs) Fred Johnson w co 14 (20) Dave Wallace, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England

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1894-05-07 (118/120lbs) [[Fred Johnson]] w co 14 (20) [[Dave Wallace]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Thought to have been for the English 120lbs title, but with both men weighing in at 118lbs Johnson took over that weight class also on winning. Wallace had started brightly enough, having Johnson on the floor in the fourth, but after the seventh the latter began to control the contest. Getting stronger every round, Johnson had Wallace down heavily in the 13th, the knockout following a round later.  
 
1894-05-07 (118/120lbs) [[Fred Johnson]] w co 14 (20) [[Dave Wallace]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Thought to have been for the English 120lbs title, but with both men weighing in at 118lbs Johnson took over that weight class also on winning. Wallace had started brightly enough, having Johnson on the floor in the fourth, but after the seventh the latter began to control the contest. Getting stronger every round, Johnson had Wallace down heavily in the 13th, the knockout following a round later.  
  
On 21 June, [[Willie Smith]] challenged all England and the world at 118lbs, and was followed by other claimants such as [[Goody York]] (who won a championship competition when outpointing [[Arthur Ward]] over four rounds at the Central Hall, Holborn, London on 20 October) and [[Bill Baxter]] (who was still referring to himself as the English champion). A few weeks later the ''Sporting Life'' stated that Smith should be recognised as the English champion as Baxter and Johnson were now fighting at a higher weight.  
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On 21 June, [[Willie Smith]] challenged all England and the world at 118lbs, and was followed by other claimants such as [[Goody York]] (who won a championship competition when outpointing [[Arthur Ward]] over four rounds at the Central Hall, Holborn, London on 20 October) and [[Bill Baxter]] (who was still referring to himself as the English champion). A few weeks later, the ''Sporting Life'' stated that Smith should be recognised as the English champion as Baxter and Johnson were now fighting at a higher weight.  
  
 
With regard to the English 120lbs title, [[Ted Ware]] (the winner of a championship competition when outpointing [[Tom Ireland]] over three rounds at the NSC on 19 November), [[Young Jack Pearson]] (January 1895) and [[Alf Holden]] (November 1895) challenged all England to no avail.  
 
With regard to the English 120lbs title, [[Ted Ware]] (the winner of a championship competition when outpointing [[Tom Ireland]] over three rounds at the NSC on 19 November), [[Young Jack Pearson]] (January 1895) and [[Alf Holden]] (November 1895) challenged all England to no avail.  

Latest revision as of 10:14, 27 March 2013

1894-05-07 (118/120lbs) Fred Johnson w co 14 (20) Dave Wallace, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Thought to have been for the English 120lbs title, but with both men weighing in at 118lbs Johnson took over that weight class also on winning. Wallace had started brightly enough, having Johnson on the floor in the fourth, but after the seventh the latter began to control the contest. Getting stronger every round, Johnson had Wallace down heavily in the 13th, the knockout following a round later.

On 21 June, Willie Smith challenged all England and the world at 118lbs, and was followed by other claimants such as Goody York (who won a championship competition when outpointing Arthur Ward over four rounds at the Central Hall, Holborn, London on 20 October) and Bill Baxter (who was still referring to himself as the English champion). A few weeks later, the Sporting Life stated that Smith should be recognised as the English champion as Baxter and Johnson were now fighting at a higher weight.

With regard to the English 120lbs title, Ted Ware (the winner of a championship competition when outpointing Tom Ireland over three rounds at the NSC on 19 November), Young Jack Pearson (January 1895) and Alf Holden (November 1895) challenged all England to no avail.

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