Difference between revisions of "1897-11-29 (124lbs) Ben Jordan w disq 19 (20) Tommy White, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
 
(2 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
1897-11-29 (124lbs) [[Ben Jordan]] w disq 19 (20) [[Tommy White]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. After [[Dave Wallace]] was taken ill, Jordan (122½) stepped into his place to beat White (124) in a bout that was billed for the 124lbs world title. It was quickly noticeable that White had the reach on Jordan, while the latter took to the body as and when he could in a bid to wear his opponent out. The ''Sporting Life'' reported that Jordan’s mission was to bide his time and in this he ultimately succeeded by dint of pluck and perseverance. Right from the opening bell White began putting the left jab on to Jordan’s face and when the Englishman got to close quarters he would hold. There were many warnings for this offence and after the tiring White had been dropped in the 19th by a countering left to the jaw, the referee continually had to break them apart. With White swerving all over the ring in an effort to avoid Jordan’s blows to the body he was in such distress that his chief second jumped into the ring, thus earning the American a disqualification.  
+
1897-11-29 (124lbs) [[Ben Jordan]] w disq 19 (20) [[Tommy White]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. After [[Dave Wallace]] was taken ill, Jordan (122½) stepped into his place to beat White (124) in a bout that was billed for the 124lbs world title. It was quickly noticeable that White had the reach on Jordan, while the latter took to the body as and when he could in a bid to wear his opponent out. The ''Sporting Life'' reported that Jordan’s mission was to bide his time, and in this he ultimately succeeded by dint of pluck and perseverance. Right from the opening bell, when White began putting the left jab on to Jordan’s face the Englishman would immediately go to close quarters where he would hold. There were many warnings for this offence. After the tiring White had been dropped in the 19th by a countering left to the jaw, the referee continually had to break them apart. With White swerving all over the ring in an effort to avoid Jordan’s blows to the body he was in such distress that his chief second jumped into the ring, thus earning the American a disqualification.  
  
 
On 10 January 1898, [[Darkey Wallace]], the winner of a championship competition at 124lbs, challenged the world at that weight.  
 
On 10 January 1898, [[Darkey Wallace]], the winner of a championship competition at 124lbs, challenged the world at that weight.  
  
Shortly afterwards, on 16 February, at the Olympic Club, Athens, Pennsylvania, USA, [[Young Mahoney]] outscored White in a 15-round fight that was initially thought to have involved the American 125lbs title. In fact, it was made at 130lbs (3pm weigh-in), with the ''Trenton Evening Times'' reporting that Mahoney’s victory was most emphatic and White was outclassed in all departments. A growing lad, Mahoney was soon fighting at a higher poundage.  
+
Shortly afterwards, on 16 February, at the Olympic Club, Athens, Pennsylvania, USA, [[Young Mahoney]] outscored White in a 15-round fight that was initially thought to have involved the American 125lbs title. In fact, it was made at 130lbs (3pm weigh-in), with the ''Trenton Evening Times'' reporting that Mahoney’s victory was most emphatic as White had been outclassed in all departments. A growing lad, Mahoney was soon fighting at a higher poundage.  
  
 
[[Category: 1897 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1897 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 13:45, 27 March 2013

1897-11-29 (124lbs) Ben Jordan w disq 19 (20) Tommy White, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. After Dave Wallace was taken ill, Jordan (122½) stepped into his place to beat White (124) in a bout that was billed for the 124lbs world title. It was quickly noticeable that White had the reach on Jordan, while the latter took to the body as and when he could in a bid to wear his opponent out. The Sporting Life reported that Jordan’s mission was to bide his time, and in this he ultimately succeeded by dint of pluck and perseverance. Right from the opening bell, when White began putting the left jab on to Jordan’s face the Englishman would immediately go to close quarters where he would hold. There were many warnings for this offence. After the tiring White had been dropped in the 19th by a countering left to the jaw, the referee continually had to break them apart. With White swerving all over the ring in an effort to avoid Jordan’s blows to the body he was in such distress that his chief second jumped into the ring, thus earning the American a disqualification.

On 10 January 1898, Darkey Wallace, the winner of a championship competition at 124lbs, challenged the world at that weight.

Shortly afterwards, on 16 February, at the Olympic Club, Athens, Pennsylvania, USA, Young Mahoney outscored White in a 15-round fight that was initially thought to have involved the American 125lbs title. In fact, it was made at 130lbs (3pm weigh-in), with the Trenton Evening Times reporting that Mahoney’s victory was most emphatic as White had been outclassed in all departments. A growing lad, Mahoney was soon fighting at a higher poundage.