Difference between revisions of "1898-01-17 (150lbs) Jerry Driscoll w pts 20 Tom Woodley, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

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1898-01-17 (150lbs) [[Jerry Driscoll]] w pts 20 [[Tom Woodley]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Despite a lack of billing this contest was regarded by those in the know as involving the English 150lbs title. Prior to the 17th round the men were difficult to split in what had been an even match-up but from thereon it was Driscoll (149½) who did the better work and on several occasions Woodley (146) was seen to be groggy. Never wasting a punch, the sailor fired away with both hands and pinned Woodley back to such a degree that there could only be one winner at the final bell.  
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1898-01-17 (150lbs) [[Jerry Driscoll]] w pts 20 [[Tom Woodley]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Despite a lack of billing this contest was regarded by those in the know as involving the English 150lbs title. Prior to the 17th round the men were difficult to split in what had been an even match-up but from there on in it was Driscoll (149½) who did the better work and on several occasions Woodley (146) was seen to be groggy. Never wasting a punch, the sailor fired away with both hands and pinned Woodley back to such a degree that there could only be one winner at the final bell.  
  
 
Driscoll, an unassuming man, never pushed his claim and it never took off.  
 
Driscoll, an unassuming man, never pushed his claim and it never took off.  

Revision as of 03:40, 23 March 2012

1898-01-17 (150lbs) Jerry Driscoll w pts 20 Tom Woodley, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Bernard J. Angle. Despite a lack of billing this contest was regarded by those in the know as involving the English 150lbs title. Prior to the 17th round the men were difficult to split in what had been an even match-up but from there on in it was Driscoll (149½) who did the better work and on several occasions Woodley (146) was seen to be groggy. Never wasting a punch, the sailor fired away with both hands and pinned Woodley back to such a degree that there could only be one winner at the final bell.

Driscoll, an unassuming man, never pushed his claim and it never took off.