Difference between revisions of "1899-03-04 Frank Childs w rtd 6 (10) Bob Armstrong, Stag AC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA"

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1899-03-04 [[Frank Childs]] w rtd 6 (10) [[Bob Armstrong]], Stag AC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Referee: Johnny Murphy. Reduced from 15 rounds due to State law, Armstrong, much the taller of the pair, started well with the left jab before being staggered in the second round by a solid right to the jaw. Picking it up in the third, Childs soon had Armstrong in trouble, dropping him with a right swing to the head. Both men gave it everything they had in the fourth and fifth sessions before Childs got right on top. In the sixth, Armstrong was sent crashing into the ropes from a heavy right to the jaw and when he rebounded off them another big right sent him staggering around the ring in a befuddled state, whereupon his corner threw up the sponge.  
 
1899-03-04 [[Frank Childs]] w rtd 6 (10) [[Bob Armstrong]], Stag AC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Referee: Johnny Murphy. Reduced from 15 rounds due to State law, Armstrong, much the taller of the pair, started well with the left jab before being staggered in the second round by a solid right to the jaw. Picking it up in the third, Childs soon had Armstrong in trouble, dropping him with a right swing to the head. Both men gave it everything they had in the fourth and fifth sessions before Childs got right on top. In the sixth, Armstrong was sent crashing into the ropes from a heavy right to the jaw and when he rebounded off them another big right sent him staggering around the ring in a befuddled state, whereupon his corner threw up the sponge.  
  
On 6 June 1899 Childs suffered a shock four-round knockout defeat at the hands of [[Jim Janey]] at Stubener’s Road House, Washington DC, effectively putting an end his ‘black’ title claim at that moment in time. The ''Washington Post'' gave it as a two-round win for Janey, stating that Childs was like putty in his hands. We do not know whether Janey was calling himself the ‘black’ champion after this, but we do know that he next took on [[Joe Gleeves]] (w co 4 on 19 June at the Eureka AC, Baltimore, Maryland) and [[Bill Peyton]] (drew 15 on 18 August in Washington DC) before being knocked out inside 12 rounds by Peyton  on 12 September at Stubener’s Road House).   
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On 6 June 1899 Childs suffered a shock four-round knockout defeat at the hands of [[Jim Janey]] at Stubener’s Road House, Washington DC, effectively putting an end his ‘black’ title claim at that moment in time. The ''Washington Post'' gave it as a two-round win for Janey, stating that Childs was like putty in his hands. We do not know whether Janey was calling himself the ‘black’ champion after this, but we do know that he next took on [[Joe Gleeves]] (w co 4 on 19 June at the Eureka AC, Baltimore, Maryland) and [[Billy Peyton]] (drew 15 on 18 August in Washington DC) before being knocked out inside 12 rounds by Peyton  on 12 September at Stubener’s Road House).   
  
 
[[Category: 1899 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1899 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]

Revision as of 15:32, 4 May 2012

1899-03-04 Frank Childs w rtd 6 (10) Bob Armstrong, Stag AC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Referee: Johnny Murphy. Reduced from 15 rounds due to State law, Armstrong, much the taller of the pair, started well with the left jab before being staggered in the second round by a solid right to the jaw. Picking it up in the third, Childs soon had Armstrong in trouble, dropping him with a right swing to the head. Both men gave it everything they had in the fourth and fifth sessions before Childs got right on top. In the sixth, Armstrong was sent crashing into the ropes from a heavy right to the jaw and when he rebounded off them another big right sent him staggering around the ring in a befuddled state, whereupon his corner threw up the sponge.

On 6 June 1899 Childs suffered a shock four-round knockout defeat at the hands of Jim Janey at Stubener’s Road House, Washington DC, effectively putting an end his ‘black’ title claim at that moment in time. The Washington Post gave it as a two-round win for Janey, stating that Childs was like putty in his hands. We do not know whether Janey was calling himself the ‘black’ champion after this, but we do know that he next took on Joe Gleeves (w co 4 on 19 June at the Eureka AC, Baltimore, Maryland) and Billy Peyton (drew 15 on 18 August in Washington DC) before being knocked out inside 12 rounds by Peyton on 12 September at Stubener’s Road House).