Difference between revisions of "1902-04-28 (132lbs) Bob Russell w pts 10 George Cunningham, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

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1902-04-28 (132lbs) Bob Russell w pts 10 George Cunningham, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Made at 132lbs, following a scrappy couple of rounds Russell (129) dropped Cunningham (131) in the third with a right to the face, but the latter was soon back in action, scoring with solid blows of his own. In the fourth the referee warned Russell, who had been up to his tricks, not to go down without being hit. Coming into the sixth Russell was thought to be ahead and in the next session he put Cunningham down again. The remainder of the contest saw Russell come under a fair bit of pressure, especially from a terrific right to the head in the tenth, while mainly keeping away from trouble to earn a well deserved decision over a dangerous opponent. Although not a billed title bout and not over the championship distance, Russell, who also had a good claim to the 134lbs title, claimed the English 132lbs title on the result and challenged all England to sort out any dispute. However, on 31 July 1903 he had set sail for South Africa and was not involved in the weight class again. By July 1905, back in England, Russell bemoaned the fact that he could not get championship matches and was thinking of retiring.  
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1902-04-28 (132lbs) [[Bob Russell]] w pts 10 [[George Cunningham]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Made at 132lbs, following a scrappy couple of rounds Russell (129) dropped Cunningham (131) in the third with a right to the face, but the latter was soon back in action, scoring with solid blows of his own. In the fourth the referee warned Russell, who had been up to his tricks, not to go down without being hit. Coming into the sixth Russell was thought to be ahead and in the next session he put Cunningham down again. The remainder of the contest saw Russell come under a fair bit of pressure, especially from a terrific right to the head in the tenth, while mainly keeping away from trouble to earn a well-deserved decision over a dangerous opponent.  
  
[[Category: 1902 Lightweight Title Contests]]
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Although not a billed title bout and not over the championship distance, Russell, who also had a good claim to the 134lbs title, claimed the English 132lbs title on the result and challenged all England to sort out any dispute. However, on 31 July 1903 he had set sail for South Africa and was not involved in the weight class again. By July 1905, back in England, Russell bemoaned the fact that he could not get championship matches and was thinking of retiring.
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[[Category: 1902 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Revision as of 11:23, 24 March 2012

1902-04-28 (132lbs) Bob Russell w pts 10 George Cunningham, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Made at 132lbs, following a scrappy couple of rounds Russell (129) dropped Cunningham (131) in the third with a right to the face, but the latter was soon back in action, scoring with solid blows of his own. In the fourth the referee warned Russell, who had been up to his tricks, not to go down without being hit. Coming into the sixth Russell was thought to be ahead and in the next session he put Cunningham down again. The remainder of the contest saw Russell come under a fair bit of pressure, especially from a terrific right to the head in the tenth, while mainly keeping away from trouble to earn a well-deserved decision over a dangerous opponent.

Although not a billed title bout and not over the championship distance, Russell, who also had a good claim to the 134lbs title, claimed the English 132lbs title on the result and challenged all England to sort out any dispute. However, on 31 July 1903 he had set sail for South Africa and was not involved in the weight class again. By July 1905, back in England, Russell bemoaned the fact that he could not get championship matches and was thinking of retiring.