Difference between revisions of "1902-06-21 (134lbs) Jabez White w pts 15 Spike Sullivan, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

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1902-06-21 (134lbs) [[Jabez White]] w pts 15 [[Spike Sullivan]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Billed for the world 134lbs title with both men inside the weight, it was fast and well contested most of the way and while there were no knockdowns as such there were some hefty blows delivered by both men. Behind with three rounds to go Sullivan looked to make up lost ground, but his rushing tactics merely played into White’s hands, the Englishman’s left jabs gathering more points to make sure of the win. While there was no doubt that Sullivan had been dangerous right up to the final bell, it was White’s cool and clever boxing that ultimately won the day.   
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1902-06-21 (134lbs) [[Jabez White]] w pts 15 [[Spike Sullivan]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Billed for the world 134lbs title, with both men inside the weight, it was fast and well contested most of the way, and while there were no knockdowns as such there were some hefty blows delivered by both men. Behind with three rounds to go Sullivan looked to make up lost ground, but his rushing tactics merely played into White’s hands, the Englishman’s left jabs gathering more points to make sure of the win. While there was no doubt that Sullivan had been dangerous right up to the final bell, it was White’s cool and clever boxing that ultimately won the day.   
  
 
[[Category: 1902 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1902 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 15:23, 13 April 2013

1902-06-21 (134lbs) Jabez White w pts 15 Spike Sullivan, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Billed for the world 134lbs title, with both men inside the weight, it was fast and well contested most of the way, and while there were no knockdowns as such there were some hefty blows delivered by both men. Behind with three rounds to go Sullivan looked to make up lost ground, but his rushing tactics merely played into White’s hands, the Englishman’s left jabs gathering more points to make sure of the win. While there was no doubt that Sullivan had been dangerous right up to the final bell, it was White’s cool and clever boxing that ultimately won the day.