Difference between revisions of "1902-09-08 (120lbs) Pedlar Palmer w pts 15 George Dixon, New National AC, Marylebone, London, England"

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1902-09-08 (120lbs) [[Pedlar Palmer]] w pts 15 [[George Dixon]], New National AC, Marylebone, London, England. Referee: Eugene Corri. This was a battle between two of Terry McGovern’s victims and one that had long been awaited. Throughout the contest, Palmer was the cleverer man and virtually took every round from the second onwards, while Dixon proved to be a shell of the once great fighter despite him still being a dangerous opponent. Palmer’s jabbing was still of the highest order, as was his movement, and it was a great surprise when the judges disagreed with each other, leaving the referee to hand his casting vote to the Englishman.  
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1902-09-08 (120lbs) [[Pedlar Palmer]] w pts 15 [[George Dixon]], New National AC, Marylebone, London, England. Referee: Eugene Corri. This was a battle between two of Terry McGovern’s victims, and one that had long been awaited. Throughout the contest Palmer was the cleverer man, virtually taking every round from the second onwards, while Dixon proved to be a shell of the once great fighter despite him still being a dangerous opponent. Palmer’s jabbing was still of the highest order, as was his movement, and it was a great surprise when the judges disagreed with each other, leaving the referee to hand his casting vote to the Englishman.  
  
 
Regardless of the lack of title billing, with both men inside 120lbs Palmer claimed the world title at the weight.  
 
Regardless of the lack of title billing, with both men inside 120lbs Palmer claimed the world title at the weight.  

Revision as of 17:13, 7 December 2012

1902-09-08 (120lbs) Pedlar Palmer w pts 15 George Dixon, New National AC, Marylebone, London, England. Referee: Eugene Corri. This was a battle between two of Terry McGovern’s victims, and one that had long been awaited. Throughout the contest Palmer was the cleverer man, virtually taking every round from the second onwards, while Dixon proved to be a shell of the once great fighter despite him still being a dangerous opponent. Palmer’s jabbing was still of the highest order, as was his movement, and it was a great surprise when the judges disagreed with each other, leaving the referee to hand his casting vote to the Englishman.

Regardless of the lack of title billing, with both men inside 120lbs Palmer claimed the world title at the weight.