Difference between revisions of "1904-09-05 (142lbs) Joe Walcott drew 15 Sam Langford, Queen City AC Coliseum, Manchester, Massachusetts, USA"

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1904-09-05 (142lbs) [[Joe Walcott]] drew 15 [[Sam Langford]], Queen City AC Coliseum, Manchester, Massachusetts, USA. Refusing to accept the loss to the [[Dixie Kid]], Walcott signed Articles of' Agreement for a title defence at 142lbs against the much feared Langford who was more than capable of making the weight at that stage of his career. Regardless of the official result Langford clearly outpointed Walcott, dropping his rival on one knee in the third and hammering him with lefts and rights to keep him bleeding throughout. Langford, who had the advantage of the longer reach, also cleverly avoided many of the blows coming his way by good footwork.   
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1904-09-05 (142lbs) [[Joe Walcott]] drew 15 [[Sam Langford]], Queen City AC Coliseum, Manchester, Massachusetts, USA. Refusing to accept the loss to the [[Dixie Kid]], Walcott signed Articles of' Agreement for a title defence at 142lbs against the much feared Langford, who was more than capable of making the weight at that stage of his career. Regardless of the official result Langford clearly outpointed Walcott, dropping his rival on one knee in the third, while hammering him with lefts and rights to keep him bleeding throughout. Langford, who had the advantage of the longer reach, also cleverly avoided many of the blows coming his way by good footwork.   
  
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 09:46, 27 May 2013

1904-09-05 (142lbs) Joe Walcott drew 15 Sam Langford, Queen City AC Coliseum, Manchester, Massachusetts, USA. Refusing to accept the loss to the Dixie Kid, Walcott signed Articles of' Agreement for a title defence at 142lbs against the much feared Langford, who was more than capable of making the weight at that stage of his career. Regardless of the official result Langford clearly outpointed Walcott, dropping his rival on one knee in the third, while hammering him with lefts and rights to keep him bleeding throughout. Langford, who had the advantage of the longer reach, also cleverly avoided many of the blows coming his way by good footwork.