Difference between revisions of "1904-09-30 (142lbs) Joe Walcott drew 20 Joe Gans, Woodward’s Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
1904-09-30 (142lbs) [[Joe Walcott]] drew 20 [[Joe Gans]], Woodward’s Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Jack Welch. Reported in some papers as being for the 142lbs title despite the [[Dixie Kid]]’s continuing claim, the ''San Francisco Chronicle'' stated that the two champions would be doing battle on neutral ground at 141lbs. This was supported when Billy Pierce, an authority on pugilistic matters at the time, was quoted as saying that the title was not involved due to the men fighting at a weight below the recognised 142lbs. However, whatever was said it had to involve Walcott’s title and it was treated as such by the fighters. It was soon apparent that Gans (137) was the cleverest of the pair, while Walcott (141) concentrated on the right swing to the body, and although there were no knockdowns it was exciting. Later in the contest Gans found a way to protect himself from the right by stepping inside it and countering with his own right to the jaw. At the final bell opinions were divided as to who would win and because it was relatively close a draw should be seen as a fair result.  
+
1904-09-30 (142lbs) [[Joe Walcott]] drew 20 [[Joe Gans]], Woodward’s Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Jack Welch. Reported in some papers as being for the 142lbs title despite the [[Dixie Kid]]’s continuing claim, the ''San Francisco Chronicle'' stated that the two champions would be doing battle on neutral ground at 141lbs. This was supported when Billy Pierce, an authority on pugilistic matters at the time, was quoted as saying that the title was not involved due to the men fighting at a weight below the recognised 142lbs. However, whatever was said it had to involve Walcott’s title and was treated as such by the fighters. It was soon apparent that Gans (137) was the cleverest of the pair while Walcott (141) concentrated on the right swing to the body, and although there were no knockdowns it was exciting. Later in the contest Gans found a way to protect himself from the right by stepping inside it and countering with his own right to the jaw. At the final bell, with opinions divided as to who would win, a draw should be seen as a fair result.  
  
 
In October, Walcott accidentally shot himself through the right hand (his friend and fellow boxer, [[Nelson Hall]], was killed by the same bullet) and he was forced out of the ring for almost two years.  
 
In October, Walcott accidentally shot himself through the right hand (his friend and fellow boxer, [[Nelson Hall]], was killed by the same bullet) and he was forced out of the ring for almost two years.  
  
Meantime, [[Sam Langford]], having drawn with Walcott at 142lbs on 5 September, claimed the title with some justification. In some quarters, he was even called the legitimate champion. Also claiming the title was [[Honey Mellody]], the ‘white’ 142lbs champion.
+
Meantime, [[Sam Langford]], having drawn with Walcott at 142lbs on 5 September, claimed the title with some justification. In some quarters he was even called the legitimate champion. Also claiming the title was [[Honey Mellody]], the ‘white’ 142lbs champion.
  
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 10:00, 27 May 2013

1904-09-30 (142lbs) Joe Walcott drew 20 Joe Gans, Woodward’s Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Jack Welch. Reported in some papers as being for the 142lbs title despite the Dixie Kid’s continuing claim, the San Francisco Chronicle stated that the two champions would be doing battle on neutral ground at 141lbs. This was supported when Billy Pierce, an authority on pugilistic matters at the time, was quoted as saying that the title was not involved due to the men fighting at a weight below the recognised 142lbs. However, whatever was said it had to involve Walcott’s title and was treated as such by the fighters. It was soon apparent that Gans (137) was the cleverest of the pair while Walcott (141) concentrated on the right swing to the body, and although there were no knockdowns it was exciting. Later in the contest Gans found a way to protect himself from the right by stepping inside it and countering with his own right to the jaw. At the final bell, with opinions divided as to who would win, a draw should be seen as a fair result.

In October, Walcott accidentally shot himself through the right hand (his friend and fellow boxer, Nelson Hall, was killed by the same bullet) and he was forced out of the ring for almost two years.

Meantime, Sam Langford, having drawn with Walcott at 142lbs on 5 September, claimed the title with some justification. In some quarters he was even called the legitimate champion. Also claiming the title was Honey Mellody, the ‘white’ 142lbs champion.