1904-12-20 (133lbs) Jimmy Britt w pts 20 Battling Nelson, Mechanics’ Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA

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1904-12-20 (133lbs) [[Jimmy Britt]] w pts 20 [[Battling Nelson]], Mechanics’ Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. A tremendous all-action contest saw Britt come out on top against a veritable iron man in Nelson, the latter proving he could take as much punishment that could be thrown at him and still come back for more. Forcing the fight throughout, because of his shorter reach Nelson was looking to get inside and despite being punched all over the ring at times he was always right in front of Britt, who was forced to take many heavy blows himself. Having battered Nelson all around the ring in the last round the weary Britt was given the decision due to his cleaner hitting and margin of scoring shots.  
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1904-12-20 (133lbs) [[Jimmy Britt]] w pts 20 [[Battling Nelson]], Mechanics’ Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. A tremendous all-action contest saw Britt come out on top against a veritable iron man in Nelson, the latter proving he could take as much punishment that could be thrown at him and still come back for more. Forcing the fight throughout, because of his shorter reach Nelson was looking to get inside, and despite being punched all over the ring at times he was always right in front of Britt who was forced to take many heavy blows himself. Having battered Nelson all around the ring in the last round the weary Britt was given the decision due to his cleaner hitting and margin of scoring shots.  
  
Although George Siler, the famous referee, writing in the ''Chicago Tribune'', reported that [[Joe Gans]] should still be considered the champion, this contest was recognised by many as being for the 133lbs title, a point made by the ''Boston Globe'', which claimed on 20 December that Britt was the acknowledged champion of America and the fight, therefore, was for the lightweight championship. The day after, the ''San Francisco Chronicle'' reported that in the opinion of the sporting men at ringside, Britt’s victory carried with it the lightweight championship of the world and on the same day the ''Sporting Life'' in England stated that since Gans could not get below 135lbs any longer, Britt (133lbs) and [[Jabez White]] (134lbs) should be seen as world champions at their respective weights.  
+
Although George Siler, the famous referee, writing in the ''Chicago Tribune'', reported that [[Joe Gans]] should still be considered the champion, this contest was recognised by many as being for the 133lbs title, a point made by the ''Boston Globe'', which claimed on 20 December that Britt was the acknowledged champion of America and the fight had been for the lightweight championship. The day after, the ''San Francisco Chronicle'' reported that in the opinion of the sporting men at ringside Britt’s victory carried with it the lightweight championship of the world. On the same day the ''Sporting Life'' in England stated that since Gans could not get below 135lbs any longer, Britt (133lbs) and [[Jabez White]] (134lbs) should be seen as world champions at their respective weights.  
  
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1904 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 12:35, 14 April 2013

1904-12-20 (133lbs) Jimmy Britt w pts 20 Battling Nelson, Mechanics’ Pavilion, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. A tremendous all-action contest saw Britt come out on top against a veritable iron man in Nelson, the latter proving he could take as much punishment that could be thrown at him and still come back for more. Forcing the fight throughout, because of his shorter reach Nelson was looking to get inside, and despite being punched all over the ring at times he was always right in front of Britt who was forced to take many heavy blows himself. Having battered Nelson all around the ring in the last round the weary Britt was given the decision due to his cleaner hitting and margin of scoring shots.

Although George Siler, the famous referee, writing in the Chicago Tribune, reported that Joe Gans should still be considered the champion, this contest was recognised by many as being for the 133lbs title, a point made by the Boston Globe, which claimed on 20 December that Britt was the acknowledged champion of America and the fight had been for the lightweight championship. The day after, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that in the opinion of the sporting men at ringside Britt’s victory carried with it the lightweight championship of the world. On the same day the Sporting Life in England stated that since Gans could not get below 135lbs any longer, Britt (133lbs) and Jabez White (134lbs) should be seen as world champions at their respective weights.

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