1906-08-04 (150lbs) Pat Daly w co 9 (15) Charlie Knock, Wonderland, Mile End, London, England

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1906-08-04 (150lbs) Pat Daly w co 9 (15) Charlie Knock, Wonderland, Mile End, London, England. Referee: Dave Fineberg. Billed and reported as being for the English 150lbs title over two-minute rounds, up until the fourth round Daly (150) was content to wait for Knock (148½) to come on to his punches. By the fifth, however, realising he was behind on points Daly began to open up, and in the seventh it was noticeable that Knock was fast weakening after taking several rights to the body. Although Knock came back coolly in the eighth, with Daly biding his time a left to the jaw a right to the body dropped the Stratford man for the full count in the ninth. Years later, Daly always said that his contests against Mike Crawley and Knock were over three-minute rounds not the normal two-minutes mainly seen at Wonderland.

In the aftermath, Daly was challenged by both Crawley and Charlie Allum to settle the title, while Jack Kingsland (October) was still claiming to be the champion.

In November 1907, Knock was said to have outpointed Allum over ten rounds at Wonderland. According to Harold Alderman, the fight had been advertised for two-minute rounds at 150lbs for the 18th November. However, all he could find was a comment made in the 23 November edition of the Sporting Life stating that the contest had taken place on the 16th but had been missed out of the report covering the show. This was strange as Allum had been knocked out inside a round by James Tiger Smith at the NSC, Covent Garden, London two days previously and would have been in no fit condition at that time.

Regardless of whether the fight took place or not, Knock was still claiming the English 150lbs title throughout the remaining months of 1906 and 1907 despite his defeat at the hands of Daly, while Allum continued to be listed as the English 150lbs champion in the Sporting Life on 4 April 1908, a title he claimed right up until the NSC set the new weight standards on 11 February 1909.