Difference between revisions of "1907-02-25 Gunner Moir w co 1 (20) James Tiger Smith, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England"

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1907-02-25 Gunner Moir w co 1 (20) James Tiger Smith, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Smith (161) made the first move, banging in southpaw lefts to Moir’s face, but once the latter had overcome that problem it was all downhill for the Welshman. Dropped by a right swing, Smith got to his feet and even troubled Moir (180) for a moment or two before being floored five more times by hammer-fisted blows, the last occasion seeing him counted out on the 2.49 mark. A few months later, on 6 July, it was reported in the Sporting Life that Moir had challenged Tommy Burns to decide the world title for the best purse in the USA. On 26 April the Sporting Life reported that both Jem Roche and Charlie Wilson were claiming the English title, to which Moir responded that if either put down a £500 deposit the match could be made for October. Wilson had stopped Moir inside two rounds at Wonderland, Mile End, London on 26 September 1903 and was sure he could repeat the exercise. According to Moir it was only his fourth contest and he had got out of a sick bed to take it before a twisted ankle brought matters to a conclusion. He went on to state that if Wilson cared to put the money up he could have the fight.  
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1907-02-25 [[Gunner Moir]] w co 1 (20) [[James Tiger Smith]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Smith (161) made the first move, banging in southpaw lefts to Moir’s face, but once the latter had overcome that problem it was all downhill for the Welshman. Dropped by a right swing, Smith got to his feet and even troubled Moir (180) for a moment or two before being floored five more times by hammer-fisted blows, the last occasion seeing him counted out on the 2.49 mark.  
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A few months later, on 6 July, it was reported in the ''Sporting Life'' that Moir had challenged [[Tommy Burns]] to decide the world title for the best purse in the USA.  
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On 26 April the ''Sporting Life'' reported that both [[Jem Roche]] and [[Charlie Wilson]] were claiming the English title, to which Moir responded that if either put down a £500 deposit the match could be made for October. Wilson had stopped Moir inside two rounds at Wonderland, Mile End, London on 26 September 1903 and was sure he could repeat the exercise. According to Moir it was only his fourth contest and he had got out of a sick bed to take it before a twisted ankle brought matters to a conclusion. He went on to state that if Wilson cared to put the money up he could have the fight.  
  
 
[[Category: 1907 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1907 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Heavyweight Division]]

Revision as of 13:15, 8 March 2012

1907-02-25 Gunner Moir w co 1 (20) James Tiger Smith, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England. Referee: Tom Scott. Smith (161) made the first move, banging in southpaw lefts to Moir’s face, but once the latter had overcome that problem it was all downhill for the Welshman. Dropped by a right swing, Smith got to his feet and even troubled Moir (180) for a moment or two before being floored five more times by hammer-fisted blows, the last occasion seeing him counted out on the 2.49 mark.

A few months later, on 6 July, it was reported in the Sporting Life that Moir had challenged Tommy Burns to decide the world title for the best purse in the USA.

On 26 April the Sporting Life reported that both Jem Roche and Charlie Wilson were claiming the English title, to which Moir responded that if either put down a £500 deposit the match could be made for October. Wilson had stopped Moir inside two rounds at Wonderland, Mile End, London on 26 September 1903 and was sure he could repeat the exercise. According to Moir it was only his fourth contest and he had got out of a sick bed to take it before a twisted ankle brought matters to a conclusion. He went on to state that if Wilson cared to put the money up he could have the fight.