Difference between revisions of "1907-11-12 (158lbs) Sam Langford w pts 20 Young Peter Jackson, Pacific AC, Los Angeles, California, USA"

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1907-11-12 (158lbs) [[Sam Langford]] w pts 20 [[Young Peter Jackson]], Pacific AC, Los Angeles, California, USA. Referee: Charles Eyton. Made at 158lbs, with both men inside the weight, Langford outfought Jackson when sending in terrific blows to the body and although the latter looked for a foul on the odd occasion it was only his gameness that kept him going.  
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1907-11-12 (158lbs) [[Sam Langford]] w pts 20 [[Young Peter Jackson]], Pacific AC, Los Angeles, California, USA. Referee: Charles Eyton. Made at 158lbs, with both men inside the weight, Langford outfought Jackson when sending in terrific blows to the body, and although the latter looked for a foul on the odd occasion it was only his gameness that kept him going.  
  
 
Langford cemented his claim to the title in this one, while Jackson retired just one fight later.  
 
Langford cemented his claim to the title in this one, while Jackson retired just one fight later.  
  
On 11 March 1908 at the Roanoke AC, Boston, Massachusetts, a marginally overweight Langford outpointed [[Larry Temple]] over eight rounds in what the ''Boston Post'' called a fight for the ‘black’ title.  
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On 11 March 1908, at the Roanoke AC, Boston, Massachusetts, a marginally overweight Langford outpointed [[Larry Temple]] over eight rounds in what the ''Boston Post'' called a fight for the ‘black’ title.  
  
Continuing to challenge all and sundry, in January 1909 the ''Mirror of Life'' declared Langford to be the world champion because [[Tom Thomas]], [[Stanley Ketchel]] and [[Billy Papke]] were all drawing the colour bar. Langford immediately challenged Ketchel, undertaking to stop him inside ten rounds or forfeit his purse, and deposited £200 with that intent. In July 1909, Ketchel refused to defend against Langford, asking for ten rounds at catchweights instead, and from thereon the latter concentrated on the bigger men, while still hoping for a meaningful crack at the title.   
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Continuing to challenge all and sundry, in January 1909 the ''Mirror of Life'' declared Langford to be the world champion because [[Tom Thomas]], [[Stanley Ketchel]] and [[Billy Papke]] were all drawing the 'Colour Bar'. Langford immediately challenged Ketchel, undertaking to stop him inside ten rounds or forfeit his purse, depositing £200 with that intent. In July 1909, Ketchel refused to defend against Langford, asking for ten rounds at catchweights instead, and from there onwards the latter concentrated on the bigger men while still hoping for a meaningful crack at the title.   
  
 
[[Category: 1907 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1907 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 17:41, 14 June 2013

1907-11-12 (158lbs) Sam Langford w pts 20 Young Peter Jackson, Pacific AC, Los Angeles, California, USA. Referee: Charles Eyton. Made at 158lbs, with both men inside the weight, Langford outfought Jackson when sending in terrific blows to the body, and although the latter looked for a foul on the odd occasion it was only his gameness that kept him going.

Langford cemented his claim to the title in this one, while Jackson retired just one fight later.

On 11 March 1908, at the Roanoke AC, Boston, Massachusetts, a marginally overweight Langford outpointed Larry Temple over eight rounds in what the Boston Post called a fight for the ‘black’ title.

Continuing to challenge all and sundry, in January 1909 the Mirror of Life declared Langford to be the world champion because Tom Thomas, Stanley Ketchel and Billy Papke were all drawing the 'Colour Bar'. Langford immediately challenged Ketchel, undertaking to stop him inside ten rounds or forfeit his purse, depositing £200 with that intent. In July 1909, Ketchel refused to defend against Langford, asking for ten rounds at catchweights instead, and from there onwards the latter concentrated on the bigger men while still hoping for a meaningful crack at the title.