Difference between revisions of "1909-07-05 (158lbs) Stanley Ketchel w pts 20 Billy Papke, Mission Street Arena, Colma, San Francisco, California, USA"

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1909-07-05 (158lbs) [[Stanley Ketchel]] w pts 20 [[Billy Papke]], Mission Street Arena, Colma, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. Billed for the championship at 158lbs, it was a poor fight with limited action. Although Ketchel blamed his performance on breaking his right hand early on, the truth of the matter was that Papke had found a way of negating his power by staying close. The tactic also enabled Papke to get his own blows off.  
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1909-07-05 (158lbs) [[Stanley Ketchel]] w pts 20 [[Billy Papke]], Mission Street Arena, Colma, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. Billed for the championship at 158lbs, it was a poor fight with limited action. Although Ketchel blamed his performance on breaking his right hand early on, the truth of the matter was that Papke had found a way of negating his power by staying close. The tactic also enabled Papke to get his own blows off to advantage.  
  
 
Having had his crack at Jack Johnson for the heavyweight crown, in January 1910 it was announced that Ketchel was relinquishing the title due to increased weight. On hearing the news it was no surprise that Papke, who was campaigning abroad, claimed the crown.  
 
Having had his crack at Jack Johnson for the heavyweight crown, in January 1910 it was announced that Ketchel was relinquishing the title due to increased weight. On hearing the news it was no surprise that Papke, who was campaigning abroad, claimed the crown.  

Revision as of 00:46, 15 June 2013

1909-07-05 (158lbs) Stanley Ketchel w pts 20 Billy Papke, Mission Street Arena, Colma, San Francisco, California, USA. Referee: Billy Roche. Billed for the championship at 158lbs, it was a poor fight with limited action. Although Ketchel blamed his performance on breaking his right hand early on, the truth of the matter was that Papke had found a way of negating his power by staying close. The tactic also enabled Papke to get his own blows off to advantage.

Having had his crack at Jack Johnson for the heavyweight crown, in January 1910 it was announced that Ketchel was relinquishing the title due to increased weight. On hearing the news it was no surprise that Papke, who was campaigning abroad, claimed the crown.