Difference between revisions of "1912-01-01 (158lbs) Jack Dillon nd-w rtd 7 (10) Leo Houck, Virginia Auditorium, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA"

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1912-01-01 (158lbs) [[Jack Dillon]] nd-w rtd 7 (10) [[Leo Houck]], Virginia Auditorium, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. With both men inside 158lbs, Dillon took over Houck’s claim at the weight on winning. Sent through the ropes on a couple of occasions, Houck was up against it from the opening bell as Dillon concentrated on his midsection, throwing solid blows from both hands with great accuracy. From the second round onwards it was clear that Dillon was too strong for Houck, but the latter stayed on gamely and took on board all the punishment that came his way. The sixth saw the beginning of the end as Dillon piled into his man, hitting him almost at will, and after Houck somehow made it back to his corner he was unable to respond to the bell starting the seventh and was retired.  
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1912-01-01 (158lbs) [[Jack Dillon]] nd-w rtd 7 (10) [[Leo Houck]], Virginia Auditorium, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. With both men inside 158lbs, Dillon took over Houck’s claim at the weight on winning. Sent through the ropes on a couple of occasions, Houck was up against it from the opening bell as Dillon concentrated on his midsection, throwing solid blows from both hands with great accuracy. From the second round onwards it was clear that Dillon was too strong for Houck, but the latter stayed on gamely when taking on board all the punishment that came his way. The sixth saw the beginning of the end as Dillon piled into his man, hitting him almost at will, and after Houck somehow made it back to his corner he was unable to respond to the bell starting the seventh.  
  
Houck’s manager stated afterwards that, in his eyes, Dillon was the best man in the world at 158lbs.  
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Houck’s manager stated afterwards that Dillon was the best man in the world at 158lbs.  
  
Another fight for Dillon where it was unclear whether he was inside 158lbs or not, but where his opponent was thought to have made that weight, came against [[Howard Wiggam]] (nd-w co 2 on 26 January at the Tomlinson Hall, Indianapolis).  
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Two fights for Dillon where it was unclear whether he was inside 158lbs or not, but where his opponents were thought to have made that weight, came against [[Billy Griffith]] (nd-w pts 6 at the Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on 20 January) and [[Howard Wiggam]] (nd-w co 2 at the Tomlinson Hall, Indianapolis on 26 January).  
  
 
[[Category: 1912 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1912 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 09:48, 15 June 2013

1912-01-01 (158lbs) Jack Dillon nd-w rtd 7 (10) Leo Houck, Virginia Auditorium, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. With both men inside 158lbs, Dillon took over Houck’s claim at the weight on winning. Sent through the ropes on a couple of occasions, Houck was up against it from the opening bell as Dillon concentrated on his midsection, throwing solid blows from both hands with great accuracy. From the second round onwards it was clear that Dillon was too strong for Houck, but the latter stayed on gamely when taking on board all the punishment that came his way. The sixth saw the beginning of the end as Dillon piled into his man, hitting him almost at will, and after Houck somehow made it back to his corner he was unable to respond to the bell starting the seventh.

Houck’s manager stated afterwards that Dillon was the best man in the world at 158lbs.

Two fights for Dillon where it was unclear whether he was inside 158lbs or not, but where his opponents were thought to have made that weight, came against Billy Griffith (nd-w pts 6 at the Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on 20 January) and Howard Wiggam (nd-w co 2 at the Tomlinson Hall, Indianapolis on 26 January).