Difference between revisions of "1912-02-21 (158lbs) Hugo Kelly nd-w pts 10 George KO Brown, Coliseum Skating Palace, Kenosha, Wisconsin, USA"

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1912-02-21 (158lbs) [[Hugo Kelly]] nd-w pts 10 [[George KO Brown]], Coliseum Skating Palace, Kenosha, Wisconsin, USA. Made at 158lbs, Kelly (158) successfully defended his title claim at the weight when keeping the dangerous Brown (155) at bay for ten rounds. While Brown was wild with his swinging blows, Kelly failed to take advantage when relying too much on his cleverness and missed many opportunities to step in with punches of his own. When Brown missed the pair would invariably clinch and hammer away one-handed, every round being the same, but at distance the Greek was outboxed and that’s where Kelly was at his best.
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1912-02-21 (158lbs) [[Hugo Kelly]] nd-w pts 10 [[George KO Brown]], Coliseum Skating Palace, Kenosha, Wisconsin, USA. Made at 158lbs, Kelly (158) successfully defended his title claim at the weight when keeping the dangerous Brown (155) at bay for ten rounds. While Brown was wild with his swinging blows, Kelly failed to take advantage when relying too much on his cleverness and missed many opportunities to step in with punches of his own. When Brown missed the pair would invariably clinch and hammer away one-handed, every round being the same, but at distance the Greek was outboxed and that is where Kelly was at his best.
  
 
[[Category: 1912 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1912 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Revision as of 10:25, 12 March 2012

1912-02-21 (158lbs) Hugo Kelly nd-w pts 10 George KO Brown, Coliseum Skating Palace, Kenosha, Wisconsin, USA. Made at 158lbs, Kelly (158) successfully defended his title claim at the weight when keeping the dangerous Brown (155) at bay for ten rounds. While Brown was wild with his swinging blows, Kelly failed to take advantage when relying too much on his cleverness and missed many opportunities to step in with punches of his own. When Brown missed the pair would invariably clinch and hammer away one-handed, every round being the same, but at distance the Greek was outboxed and that is where Kelly was at his best.