Difference between revisions of "1912-11-04 (133lbs) Ad Wolgast nd-drew 10 Joe Mandot, The National Baseball Park, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA"

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1912-11-04 (133lbs) Ad Wolgast nd-drew 10 Joe Mandot, The National Baseball Park, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Ed Smith. According to the New Orleans Daily Picayune, with both men inside 133lbs Mandot (130) was bidding to win the title and he certainly matched the champion in aggression. The fight started at a fast pace and it was soon noticeable that Wolgast was Mandot’s superior when it came to infighting with the latter, who dropped his man in the ninth, showing better generalship, especially with the left. While some papers had Mandot taking three of the last four rounds, the general concensus was that it should be seen as a draw.  
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1912-11-04 (133lbs) [[Ad Wolgast]] nd-drew 10 [[Joe Mandot]], The National Baseball Park, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Ed Smith. According to the ''New Orleans Daily Picayune'', with both men inside 133lbs Mandot (130) was bidding to win the title and he certainly matched the champion in aggression. The fight started at a fast pace and it was soon noticeable that Wolgast was Mandot’s superior when it came to infighting with the latter, who dropped his man in the ninth, showing better generalship, especially with the left. While some papers had Mandot taking three of the last four rounds, the general consensus was that it should be seen as a draw.  
  
[[Category: 1912 Lightweight Title Contests]]
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[[Category: 1912 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Revision as of 12:17, 17 March 2012

1912-11-04 (133lbs) Ad Wolgast nd-drew 10 Joe Mandot, The National Baseball Park, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Ed Smith. According to the New Orleans Daily Picayune, with both men inside 133lbs Mandot (130) was bidding to win the title and he certainly matched the champion in aggression. The fight started at a fast pace and it was soon noticeable that Wolgast was Mandot’s superior when it came to infighting with the latter, who dropped his man in the ninth, showing better generalship, especially with the left. While some papers had Mandot taking three of the last four rounds, the general consensus was that it should be seen as a draw.