Difference between revisions of "1913-10-11 (160lbs) George Chip nd-w co 6 (6) Frank Klaus, Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA"

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1913-10-11 (160lbs) George Chip nd-w co 6 (6) Frank Klaus, Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Referee: Tom Bodkins. This was not billed as a title bout as it was only a six-round no-decision affair, but Klaus’ claim to the championship was deemed to have changed hands after he was counted out. In a situation such as this the only way a champion could lose his crown, unless he stipulated a poundage above the limit of the weight class, was if he failed to last the distance and it was on this basis that Chip (161½) received recognition as champion. Klaus (163) had the better of the fight during the first three rounds before Chip came on strong to batter him all over the ring, prior to smashing him down for ‘nine’ in the sixth with a short right uppercut. Getting back on his feet, Klaus had hardly got going when Chip sent him down for the full count with a right to the head. Despite both men weighing over the middleweight limit, Chip immediately announced his right to the title and was accepted by a good many scribes. Another six rounder for Chip in Pennsylvania that was advertised as involving the title came against Leo Houck (nd-l pts 6 on 15 November 1913 at the National AC, Philadelphia), but there was no mention of weights. Regardless of the above defeat, the recently formed French-based International Boxing Union continued to recognise Klaus as the world champion.  
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1913-10-11 (160lbs) [[George Chip]] nd-w co 6 (6) [[Frank Klaus]], Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Referee: Tom Bodkins. This was not billed as a title bout as it was only a six-round no-decision affair, but Klaus’ claim to the championship was deemed to have changed hands after he was counted out. In a situation such as this the only way a champion could lose his crown, unless he stipulated a poundage above the limit of the weight class, was if he failed to last the distance. It was on this basis that Chip (161½) received recognition as champion. Klaus (163) had the better of the fight during the first three rounds before Chip came on strong to batter him all over the ring prior to smashing him down for ‘nine’ in the sixth with a short right uppercut. Getting back on his feet, Klaus had hardly got going when Chip sent him down for the full count with a right to the head.  
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Despite both men weighing over the middleweight limit, Chip immediately announced his right to the title and was accepted by a good many scribes.  
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Another six-rounder for Chip in Pennsylvania that was advertised as involving the title came against [[Leo Houck]] (nd-l pts 6 at the National AC, Philadelphia on 15 November 1913), but there was no mention of weights.  
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Regardless of the defeat at the hands of Chip, the recently formed French-based International Boxing Union continued to recognise Klaus as the world champion.  
  
 
[[Category: 1913 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1913 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 09:43, 15 June 2013

1913-10-11 (160lbs) George Chip nd-w co 6 (6) Frank Klaus, Old City Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Referee: Tom Bodkins. This was not billed as a title bout as it was only a six-round no-decision affair, but Klaus’ claim to the championship was deemed to have changed hands after he was counted out. In a situation such as this the only way a champion could lose his crown, unless he stipulated a poundage above the limit of the weight class, was if he failed to last the distance. It was on this basis that Chip (161½) received recognition as champion. Klaus (163) had the better of the fight during the first three rounds before Chip came on strong to batter him all over the ring prior to smashing him down for ‘nine’ in the sixth with a short right uppercut. Getting back on his feet, Klaus had hardly got going when Chip sent him down for the full count with a right to the head.

Despite both men weighing over the middleweight limit, Chip immediately announced his right to the title and was accepted by a good many scribes.

Another six-rounder for Chip in Pennsylvania that was advertised as involving the title came against Leo Houck (nd-l pts 6 at the National AC, Philadelphia on 15 November 1913), but there was no mention of weights.

Regardless of the defeat at the hands of Chip, the recently formed French-based International Boxing Union continued to recognise Klaus as the world champion.