Difference between revisions of "1914-12-03 Jimmy Wilde w rsc 9 (15) Sid Smith, The Stadium, Liverpool, England"

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1914-12-03 [[Jimmy Wilde]] w rsc 9 (15) [[Sid Smith]], The Stadium, Liverpool, England. Referee: Frank Bradley. Wilde successfully defended his claim to the British 112lbs title against Smith in a fast fight that was full of interest. Even for the opening four rounds, Wilde moved up through the gears in the fifth and sixth and having worked up and down for several rounds he dropped Smith three times in the ninth before the referee called a halt.  
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1914-12-03 [[Jimmy Wilde]] w rsc 9 (15) [[Sid Smith]], The Stadium, Liverpool, England. Referee: Frank Bradley. Wilde successfully defended his claim to the British 112lbs title against Smith in a fast fight that was full of interest. Even for the opening four rounds, Wilde moved up through the gears in the fifth and sixth, and having worked up and down for several rounds he dropped Smith three times in the ninth before the referee called a halt.  
  
 
Following his victory, Wilde was booked by the NSC to meet [[Tancy Lee]] in a bout where the winner would be generally recognised on this side of the Atlantic as champion.
 
Following his victory, Wilde was booked by the NSC to meet [[Tancy Lee]] in a bout where the winner would be generally recognised on this side of the Atlantic as champion.

Revision as of 17:45, 13 November 2012

1914-12-03 Jimmy Wilde w rsc 9 (15) Sid Smith, The Stadium, Liverpool, England. Referee: Frank Bradley. Wilde successfully defended his claim to the British 112lbs title against Smith in a fast fight that was full of interest. Even for the opening four rounds, Wilde moved up through the gears in the fifth and sixth, and having worked up and down for several rounds he dropped Smith three times in the ninth before the referee called a halt.

Following his victory, Wilde was booked by the NSC to meet Tancy Lee in a bout where the winner would be generally recognised on this side of the Atlantic as champion.