1915-03-02 (158lbs) Mike Gibbons nd-w pts 10 Eddie McGoorty, The Arena, Hudson, Wisconsin, USA

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1915-03-02 (158lbs) [[Mike Gibbons]] nd-w pts 10 [[Eddie McGoorty]], The Arena, Hudson, Wisconsin, USA. Referee: Harry Stout. Made at 158lbs and billed for the title, after two even rounds Gibbons (151½) started to get to McGoorty (155½) in the third when opening up with five unanswered blows to the head immediately prior to the bell. There was no doubt that Gibbons’ speed troubled McGoorty, who missed repeatedly when trying to land, and the latter also found himself losing the battle on the inside as well as at range. Up against a fine opponent, Gibbons showed that he would be just too fast and scientific for almost all of the top men around and would be an outstanding champion if he got the chance.   
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1915-03-02 (158lbs) [[Mike Gibbons]] nd-w pts 10 [[Eddie McGoorty]], The Arena, Hudson, Wisconsin, USA. Referee: Harry Stout. Made at 158lbs, and billed for the title, after two even rounds Gibbons (151½) started to get to McGoorty (155½) in the third when opening up with five unanswered blows to the head immediately prior to the bell. There was no doubt that Gibbons’ speed troubled McGoorty, who missed repeatedly when trying to land, and the latter also found himself losing the battle on the inside as well as at range. Up against a fine opponent, Gibbons showed that he would be just too fast and scientific for almost all of the top men around.   
  
 
[[Category: 1915 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1915 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 10:32, 18 June 2013

1915-03-02 (158lbs) Mike Gibbons nd-w pts 10 Eddie McGoorty, The Arena, Hudson, Wisconsin, USA. Referee: Harry Stout. Made at 158lbs, and billed for the title, after two even rounds Gibbons (151½) started to get to McGoorty (155½) in the third when opening up with five unanswered blows to the head immediately prior to the bell. There was no doubt that Gibbons’ speed troubled McGoorty, who missed repeatedly when trying to land, and the latter also found himself losing the battle on the inside as well as at range. Up against a fine opponent, Gibbons showed that he would be just too fast and scientific for almost all of the top men around.

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