Difference between revisions of "1916-02-14 Jimmy Wilde w rsc 12 (20) Joe Symonds, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England - GB/IBU"

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1916-02-14 [[Jimmy Wilde]] w rsc 12 (20) [[Joe Symonds]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England - GB/IBU. Billed as being a defence of his British and European titles, Symonds was in the fight for seven rounds before being finished off by Wilde in the 12th, having been dropped from a volley of heavy right-hand punches and rescued by the referee on rising. Wilde took over the 112lbs Lonsdale Belt on winning and was recognised in most quarters as the world’s top flyweight.  
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1916-02-14 [[Jimmy Wilde]] w rsc 12 (20) [[Joe Symonds]], NSC, Covent Garden, London, England - GB/IBU. Billed as a defence of his British and European titles, Symonds was in the fight for seven rounds before being finished off by Wilde in the 12th, having been dropped by a volley of heavy right-hand punches and rescued by the referee on rising. After Wilde took over the 112lbs Lonsdale Belt on winning he was recognised in most quarters as the world’s top flyweight.  
  
Following two inside the distance wins over [[Sam Kellar]] and [[Sid Smith]] in catchweight bouts, Wilde was next matched against his first American opponent, [[Johnny Rosner]], at eight stone. Despite the publicity engendered, Rosner, who was claiming the American title, had no record to speak of according to American sources at the time and had little right to call himself the leading man in the country. Charlie Austin, the ''Mirror of Life''’s American correspondent, felt that the best man at the weight in the USA was [[Pinky Burns]], who had been awarded a ''Police Gazette'' Flyweight Championship Belt by Richard K. Fox in 1913.
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Following two inside-the-distance wins over [[Sam Kellar]] and [[Sid Smith]] in catchweight bouts, Wilde was next matched against his first American opponent, [[Johnny Rosner]], at eight stone. Despite the publicity engendered, Rosner, who was claiming the American title, had no record to speak of according to American sources at the time and had little right to call himself the leading man in the country. Charlie Austin, the ''Mirror of Life''’s American correspondent, felt that the best man at the weight in the USA was [[Pinky Burns]], who had been awarded a ''Police Gazette'' Flyweight Championship Belt by Richard K. Fox in 1913.
  
 
[[Category: 1916 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1916 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 12:35, 5 March 2013

1916-02-14 Jimmy Wilde w rsc 12 (20) Joe Symonds, NSC, Covent Garden, London, England - GB/IBU. Billed as a defence of his British and European titles, Symonds was in the fight for seven rounds before being finished off by Wilde in the 12th, having been dropped by a volley of heavy right-hand punches and rescued by the referee on rising. After Wilde took over the 112lbs Lonsdale Belt on winning he was recognised in most quarters as the world’s top flyweight.

Following two inside-the-distance wins over Sam Kellar and Sid Smith in catchweight bouts, Wilde was next matched against his first American opponent, Johnny Rosner, at eight stone. Despite the publicity engendered, Rosner, who was claiming the American title, had no record to speak of according to American sources at the time and had little right to call himself the leading man in the country. Charlie Austin, the Mirror of Life’s American correspondent, felt that the best man at the weight in the USA was Pinky Burns, who had been awarded a Police Gazette Flyweight Championship Belt by Richard K. Fox in 1913.