Difference between revisions of "1916-04-24 (145lbs) Jack Britton w pts 20 Ted Kid Lewis, Louisiana Auditorium, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA"

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1916-04-24 (145lbs) [[Jack Britton]] w pts 20 [[Ted Kid Lewis]], Louisiana Auditorium, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Dick Burke. In a match made at 145lbs at 3pm, with both men on the limit, Britton picked up Lewis’ title claim when keeping up a fusillade of left jabs round after round to take the decision. Although there were no knockdowns, Lewis was forced to defend almost throughout as Britton kept him on the back foot and it was only in the 19th that the Englishman came to life as the latter tired, landing lefts and rights to head and body in a vain attempt to make up the leeway.  
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1916-04-24 (145lbs) [[Jack Britton]] w pts 20 [[Ted Kid Lewis]], Louisiana Auditorium, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Dick Burke. In a match made at 145lbs, 3pm weigh-in, with both men on the limit, Britton picked up Lewis’ title claim when keeping up a fusillade of left jabs round after round to take the decision. Although there were no knockdowns, Lewis was forced to defend almost throughout as Britton kept him on the back foot, and it was only in the 19th that the Englishman came to life as the latter tired, landing lefts and rights to head and body in a vain attempt to make up the leeway.  
  
 
[[Category: 1916 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1916 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 18:52, 28 May 2013

1916-04-24 (145lbs) Jack Britton w pts 20 Ted Kid Lewis, Louisiana Auditorium, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Referee: Dick Burke. In a match made at 145lbs, 3pm weigh-in, with both men on the limit, Britton picked up Lewis’ title claim when keeping up a fusillade of left jabs round after round to take the decision. Although there were no knockdowns, Lewis was forced to defend almost throughout as Britton kept him on the back foot, and it was only in the 19th that the Englishman came to life as the latter tired, landing lefts and rights to head and body in a vain attempt to make up the leeway.