Difference between revisions of "1924-07-16 Abe Goldstein w pts 15 Charles Ledoux, The Velodrome, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD"

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16 July [[Abe Goldstein]] w pts 15 [[Charles Ledoux]], [[The Velodrome, Bronx, NYC, New York]], USA - WORLD. Referee: [[Ed Purdy]]. Dropped in the eighth and 14th rounds, the badly marked up challenger showed that he was only a shadow of the once top fighter he was when making such a poor showing and being in distress from the very first round. That Goldstein (116) was unable to put Ledoux (117¾) to sleep upset the crowd, but the Frenchman had only been stopped inside the distance once in 125 previous contests and on realising that it might be a long night the former depended on his boxing to gain him the unanimous decision.
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1924-07-16 [[Abe Goldstein]] w pts 15 [[Charles Ledoux]], The Velodrome, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ed Purdy. Dropped in the eighth and 14th rounds, the badly marked up challenger showed that he was only a shadow of the once top fighter he was when making such a poor showing and being in distress from the very first round. That Goldstein (116) was unable to put Ledoux (117¾) to sleep upset the crowd, but the Frenchman had only been stopped inside the distance once in 125 previous contests. On realising that it might be a long night it was hardly surprising that Goldstein depended on his boxing to gain him the unanimous decision.
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[[Category: 1924 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Bantamweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Bantamweight Division]]

Revision as of 13:24, 22 November 2012

1924-07-16 Abe Goldstein w pts 15 Charles Ledoux, The Velodrome, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ed Purdy. Dropped in the eighth and 14th rounds, the badly marked up challenger showed that he was only a shadow of the once top fighter he was when making such a poor showing and being in distress from the very first round. That Goldstein (116) was unable to put Ledoux (117¾) to sleep upset the crowd, but the Frenchman had only been stopped inside the distance once in 125 previous contests. On realising that it might be a long night it was hardly surprising that Goldstein depended on his boxing to gain him the unanimous decision.