1926-07-09 Pete Latzo w disq 4 (15) George Levine, Polo Grounds, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD

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1926-07-09 Pete Latzo w disq 4 (15) George Levine, Polo Grounds, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ed Purdy. Both men started well, Latzo (147) working to head and body and Levine (145½) relying more on the left jab, before the former started to get on top in the fourth round when looking for a knockout. Notwithstanding, the ending at 1.28 of the fourth was still sudden. As the champion worked Levine over and began to rock him on the ropes, the latter lashed out with a right to the body that sent Latzo to the floor claiming a foul. Although the referee picked up the count and had reached ‘four’ before he realised that Latzo was in a great deal of pain, at that point he stopped the contest and awarded the decision to the champion on a disqualification. Coming into 1927 the outstanding challenger was Joe Dundee, who reversed a shock loss when he outpointed Eddie Roberts at Madison Square Garden, Manhattan on 14 January. With Dundee in the frame, it was then reported that Latzo would be defending against the winner of a contest between him and Ace Hudkins, but that never took place, while a mooted defence against Paul Doyle on 22 February also never happened. On 18 February, Latzo took on Billy Piltz  in a ten-round no-decision contest at The Coliseum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in what was advertised in the Daily Oklahoman as a fight that the latter would have to win by a knockout, stoppage or disqualification if he wanted to take the title. At the final bell, it was Latzo who received the press decision. However, being one of two contests in three days while on tour it was highly unlikely that the championship was involved, especially as Latzo’s ten-round no-decision meeting with Clyde Hull at Gardner Park Ice Arena, Dallas, Texas on 21 February was an overweight affair. Immediately following Hull’s newspaper win over Latzo it was reported that the pair would contest the title in Scranton, but that was put on the backburner after it was announced on 26 March that Humbert Fugazy would be putting on Latzo against Dundee in June.   
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1926-07-09 [[Pete Latzo]] w disq 4 (15) [[George Levine]], Polo Grounds, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ed Purdy. Both men started well, Latzo (147) working to head and body and Levine (145½) relying more on the left jab, before the former started to get on top in the fourth round when looking for a knockout. Notwithstanding, the ending at 1.28 of the fourth was still sudden. As the champion worked Levine over and began to rock him on the ropes, the latter lashed out with a right to the body that sent Latzo to the floor claiming a foul. Although the referee picked up the count and had reached ‘four’ before he realised that Latzo was in a great deal of pain, he stopped the contest and awarded the decision to the champion on a disqualification.  
  
[[Category: 1926 Welterweight Title Contests]]
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Coming into 1927 the outstanding challenger was [[Joe Dundee]], who reversed a shock loss when he outpointed [[Eddie Roberts]] at Madison Square Garden, Manhattan on 14 January. With Dundee in the frame it was then reported that Latzo would be defending against the winner of a contest between him and [[Ace Hudkins]], but that never took place, while a mooted defence against [[Paul Doyle]] on 22 February also never happened.
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On 18 February, Latzo took on [[Billy Piltz]]  in a ten-round no-decision contest at The Coliseum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in what was advertised in the ''Daily Oklahoman'' as a fight that the latter would have to win by a knockout, stoppage or disqualification if he wanted to take the title. At the final bell, it was Latzo who received the press decision. However, being one of two contests in three days while on tour it was highly unlikely that the championship was involved, especially as Latzo’s ten-round no-decision meeting with [[Clyde Hull]] at Gardner Park Ice Arena, Dallas, Texas on 21 February was an overweight affair.
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Immediately following Hull’s newspaper win over Latzo it was reported that the pair would contest the title in Scranton, but that was put on the backburner after it was announced on 26 March that Humbert Fugazy would be putting on Latzo against Dundee in June.   
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[[Category: 1926 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Welterweight Division]]

Revision as of 16:53, 2 April 2012

1926-07-09 Pete Latzo w disq 4 (15) George Levine, Polo Grounds, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ed Purdy. Both men started well, Latzo (147) working to head and body and Levine (145½) relying more on the left jab, before the former started to get on top in the fourth round when looking for a knockout. Notwithstanding, the ending at 1.28 of the fourth was still sudden. As the champion worked Levine over and began to rock him on the ropes, the latter lashed out with a right to the body that sent Latzo to the floor claiming a foul. Although the referee picked up the count and had reached ‘four’ before he realised that Latzo was in a great deal of pain, he stopped the contest and awarded the decision to the champion on a disqualification.

Coming into 1927 the outstanding challenger was Joe Dundee, who reversed a shock loss when he outpointed Eddie Roberts at Madison Square Garden, Manhattan on 14 January. With Dundee in the frame it was then reported that Latzo would be defending against the winner of a contest between him and Ace Hudkins, but that never took place, while a mooted defence against Paul Doyle on 22 February also never happened.

On 18 February, Latzo took on Billy Piltz in a ten-round no-decision contest at The Coliseum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in what was advertised in the Daily Oklahoman as a fight that the latter would have to win by a knockout, stoppage or disqualification if he wanted to take the title. At the final bell, it was Latzo who received the press decision. However, being one of two contests in three days while on tour it was highly unlikely that the championship was involved, especially as Latzo’s ten-round no-decision meeting with Clyde Hull at Gardner Park Ice Arena, Dallas, Texas on 21 February was an overweight affair.

Immediately following Hull’s newspaper win over Latzo it was reported that the pair would contest the title in Scranton, but that was put on the backburner after it was announced on 26 March that Humbert Fugazy would be putting on Latzo against Dundee in June.

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