Difference between revisions of "1926-11-15 Dick Honeyboy Finnegan w pts 10 Chic Suggs, The Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, USA - MASSACHUSETTS"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
1926-11-15 [[Honeyboy Finnegan]] w pts 10 [[Chic Suggs]], The Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, USA - MASSACHUSETTS. Referee: Jimmy Walsh. Billed by Massachusetts as being for their version of the world title and reported in the ''Boston Post'' as being as much a world title as it could possibly be, at the finish Finnegan (125¾) was deemed by all three judges to have landed the cleaner and more effective punches from his southpaw stance. Despite Suggs (124) being a clever and speedy box-fighter, Finnegan generally made his height and reach advantages pay at distance in the earlier rounds before it became more of a slugging match, as both men looked to get their punches off after the former was badly cut from a butt over the right eye in the sixth. Tearing in regardless, in the ninth Finnegan dropped Suggs with a right-hand chop to the jaw and although the latter quickly recovered he was made to miss until the final bell sounded.  
+
1926-11-15 [[Dick Honeyboy Finnegan]] w pts 10 [[Chic Suggs]], The Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, USA - MASSACHUSETTS. Referee: Jimmy Walsh. Billed by Massachusetts as being for their version of the world title and reported in the ''Boston Post'' as being as much a world title as it could possibly be, at the finish Finnegan (125¾) was deemed by all three judges to have landed the cleaner and more effective punches from his southpaw stance. Despite Suggs (124) being a clever and speedy box-fighter, Finnegan generally made his height and reach advantages pay at distance in the earlier rounds before it became more of a slugging match, as both men looked to get their punches off after the former was badly cut from a butt over the right eye in the sixth. Tearing in regardless, in the ninth Finnegan dropped Suggs with a right-hand chop to the jaw and although the latter quickly recovered he was made to miss until the final bell sounded.  
  
 
At the end of January 1927, the British-born Canadian, [[Al Foreman]], who had recently beaten [[Carl Tremaine]] at 126lbs, was promised a title fight against Finnegan on 18 April 1927 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but it never happened due to prior obligations. Foreman was then turned down by [[Benny Bass]], who was injured, before challenging [[Johnny Dundee]] to decide his ‘version’ of the world title. However, after being turned down yet again Foreman was soon boxing in a higher weight division.  
 
At the end of January 1927, the British-born Canadian, [[Al Foreman]], who had recently beaten [[Carl Tremaine]] at 126lbs, was promised a title fight against Finnegan on 18 April 1927 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but it never happened due to prior obligations. Foreman was then turned down by [[Benny Bass]], who was injured, before challenging [[Johnny Dundee]] to decide his ‘version’ of the world title. However, after being turned down yet again Foreman was soon boxing in a higher weight division.  

Revision as of 17:31, 14 January 2012

1926-11-15 Dick Honeyboy Finnegan w pts 10 Chic Suggs, The Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, USA - MASSACHUSETTS. Referee: Jimmy Walsh. Billed by Massachusetts as being for their version of the world title and reported in the Boston Post as being as much a world title as it could possibly be, at the finish Finnegan (125¾) was deemed by all three judges to have landed the cleaner and more effective punches from his southpaw stance. Despite Suggs (124) being a clever and speedy box-fighter, Finnegan generally made his height and reach advantages pay at distance in the earlier rounds before it became more of a slugging match, as both men looked to get their punches off after the former was badly cut from a butt over the right eye in the sixth. Tearing in regardless, in the ninth Finnegan dropped Suggs with a right-hand chop to the jaw and although the latter quickly recovered he was made to miss until the final bell sounded.

At the end of January 1927, the British-born Canadian, Al Foreman, who had recently beaten Carl Tremaine at 126lbs, was promised a title fight against Finnegan on 18 April 1927 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but it never happened due to prior obligations. Foreman was then turned down by Benny Bass, who was injured, before challenging Johnny Dundee to decide his ‘version’ of the world title. However, after being turned down yet again Foreman was soon boxing in a higher weight division.

Meanwhile, on the verge of furthering his acceptance, Finnegan forfeited Massachusetts’ recognition on 21 June 1927 when unable to make 126lbs for his fight in NYC against Red Chapman. Earlier, the promoter, Humbert Fugazy, had been angered when the NYSAC failed to give the fight world title status. He stated that these boys had eliminated all others, including Bass (which was incorrect), and the winner would be generally be recognised throughout the country as being the champion despite the NYSAC edict. Following the announcement that Finnegan v Chapman was off, the Pennsylvanian Boxing Commission matched Bass, who had drawn with Finnegan over ten rounds on 12 July at Shibe Park, Philadelphia, in a catchweight bout with Chapman for their version of the world title. Bass had earlier eliminated Johnny Farr, Babe Herman, Chic Suggs and Dominick Petrone at the weight before beating Mickey Doyle by a fifth-round kayo at the Armory AC, Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania on 14 July 1927 to land the Pennsylvanian State title. He had also beaten Chapman, who was still smarting from being disqualified in the first round of their ten-round eliminator in NYC on 1 January 1927.