Difference between revisions of "1928-10-15 Frankie Genaro w pts 10 Frenchy Belanger, The Coliseum, Toronto, Canada - NBA"

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1928-10-15 [[Frankie Genaro]] w pts 10 [[Frenchy Belanger]], The Coliseum, Toronto, Canada - NBA. Referee: Elwood Hughes. Making another defence of his NBA title, Genaro (111½) found that although Belanger (111) had improved from their first fight, it was not going to be enough and he quickly got down to work to cut the challenger over the left eye in the second round. Showing his ringcraft and hand speed to good effect, Genaro, who invariably slipped inside the lead to score solid points, was considered to have only lost three rounds on his way to the unanimous decision.  
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1928-10-15 [[Frankie Genaro]] w pts 10 [[Frenchy Belanger]], The Coliseum, Toronto, Canada - NBA. Referee: Elwood Hughes. Making another defence of his NBA title, after Genaro (111½) found that although Belanger (111) had improved from their first fight it was not going to be enough he quickly got down to work to cut the challenger over the left eye in the second round. Showing his ring-craft and hand-speed to good effect, Genaro, who invariably slipped inside the lead to score solid points, was considered to have only lost three rounds on his way to the unanimous decision.  
  
 
[[Category: 1928 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1928 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 16:29, 5 March 2013

1928-10-15 Frankie Genaro w pts 10 Frenchy Belanger, The Coliseum, Toronto, Canada - NBA. Referee: Elwood Hughes. Making another defence of his NBA title, after Genaro (111½) found that although Belanger (111) had improved from their first fight it was not going to be enough he quickly got down to work to cut the challenger over the left eye in the second round. Showing his ring-craft and hand-speed to good effect, Genaro, who invariably slipped inside the lead to score solid points, was considered to have only lost three rounds on his way to the unanimous decision.