Difference between revisions of "1929-05-27 Andre Routis w rtd 3 (15) Buster Brown, Carlin’s Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, USA - WORLD"

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1929-05-27 [[Andre Routis]] w rtd 3 (15) [[Buster Brown]], Carlin’s Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, USA - WORLD. Referee: Harry Ertle. Although making it interesting for a couple of rounds, it was soon clear that the challenger, Brown (125), was no match for Routis (125½) and early in the third session he was in real trouble, being soundly punished by rights and lefts to the body. Dropped for a count of seven, on getting up he was immediately decked for another ‘seven’ count before being dumped by a vicious right to the pit of the stomach. With no way back, the towel was thrown in by Brown’s corner.  
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1929-05-27 [[Andre Routis]] w rtd 3 (15) [[Buster Brown]], Carlin’s Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, USA - WORLD. Referee: Harry Ertle. Although making it interesting for a couple of rounds it was soon clear that the challenger, Brown (125), was no match for Routis (125½), and early in the third session he was in real trouble, being soundly punished by rights and lefts to the body. Dropped for a count of seven, on getting up he was immediately decked for another ‘seven’ count before being dumped by a vicious right to the pit of the stomach. With no way back, the towel was thrown in by Brown’s corner.  
  
With Routis booked to defend his title in New York on 22 August, possibly against [[Kid Chocolate]], the proposed promotion ultimately fell through when the NYSAC decided that because Routis’ manager, Joe Jacobs, was currently under suspension in New York the champion could not fight there.  
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After Routis was booked to defend his title in New York on 22 August, possibly against [[Kid Chocolate]], the proposed promotion ultimately fell through when the NYSAC decided that because Routis’ manager, Joe Jacobs, was currently under suspension in New York the champion could not fight there. Following that, Routis signed up to defend against [[Battling Battalino]]. Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine, stated that it was regrettable that the working agreement between the NYSAC and the Connecticut Boxing Commission was broken when Thomas E. Donaghue, the State’s lone arbiter, sanctioned the match for Hartford. Fleischer went on to say that Routis should not have been held responsible for his stablemate, Max Schmeling, and his manager’s indiscretions, while a working agreement was a working agreement and should have been respected.       
 
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Following that, Routis signed up to defend against [[Battling Battalino]] and Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine, stated that it was regretted that the working agreement between the NYSAC and the Connecticut Boxing Commission was broken when Thomas E.Donaghue, the State’s lone arbiter, sanctioned the match for Hartford. Fleischer went on to say that Routis should not have been held responsible for his stablemate, Max Schmeling, and manager’s indiscretions, while a working agreement was a working agreement and should have been respected.       
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[[Category: 1929 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1929 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]

Revision as of 09:26, 3 April 2013

1929-05-27 Andre Routis w rtd 3 (15) Buster Brown, Carlin’s Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, USA - WORLD. Referee: Harry Ertle. Although making it interesting for a couple of rounds it was soon clear that the challenger, Brown (125), was no match for Routis (125½), and early in the third session he was in real trouble, being soundly punished by rights and lefts to the body. Dropped for a count of seven, on getting up he was immediately decked for another ‘seven’ count before being dumped by a vicious right to the pit of the stomach. With no way back, the towel was thrown in by Brown’s corner.

After Routis was booked to defend his title in New York on 22 August, possibly against Kid Chocolate, the proposed promotion ultimately fell through when the NYSAC decided that because Routis’ manager, Joe Jacobs, was currently under suspension in New York the champion could not fight there. Following that, Routis signed up to defend against Battling Battalino. Nat Fleischer, writing in The Ring magazine, stated that it was regrettable that the working agreement between the NYSAC and the Connecticut Boxing Commission was broken when Thomas E. Donaghue, the State’s lone arbiter, sanctioned the match for Hartford. Fleischer went on to say that Routis should not have been held responsible for his stablemate, Max Schmeling, and his manager’s indiscretions, while a working agreement was a working agreement and should have been respected.