Difference between revisions of "1933-02-22 Young Corbett III w pts 10 Jackie Fields, Seals Stadium, San Francisco, California, USA - WORLD"

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1933-02-22 [[Young Corbett 111]] w pts 10 [[Jackie Fields]], Seals Stadium, San Francisco, California, USA - WORLD. Referee: Jack Kennedy. Called the conqueror of champions, Corbett (146) lived up to his name when outboxing and outpunching Fields (146) in six of the ten sessions to take the referee’s decision. Fighting in whirlwind fashion, the southpaw challenger took Fields completely by surprise as he fired in long lefts from the start and effectively countered anything coming his way. After losing the first five rounds Fields came to life in the sixth, belting Corbett to head and body at will before tiring and taking some heavy lefts in the seventh and eighth rounds, which stopped him in his tracks. The ninth and tenth sessions saw Fields battering Corbett around the ring in a desperate bid to hold on to his title, but with a minute to go he was badly hurt by lefts to the jaw and rights to the body before slumping on to his stool at the bell.   
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1933-02-22 [[Young Corbett 111]] w pts 10 [[Jackie Fields]], Seals Stadium, San Francisco, California, USA - WORLD. Referee: Jack Kennedy. Called the conqueror of champions, Corbett (146) lived up to his name when outboxing and outpunching Fields (146) in six of the ten sessions to take the referee’s decision. Fighting in whirlwind fashion, the southpaw challenger took Fields completely by surprise as he fired in long lefts from the start while effectively countering anything coming his way. After losing the first five rounds Fields came to life in the sixth, belting Corbett to head and body at will before tiring after taking some heavy lefts in the seventh and eighth rounds, which stopped him in his tracks. The ninth and tenth sessions saw Fields battering Corbett around the ring in a desperate bid to hold on to his title, but with a minute to go he was badly hurt by lefts to the jaw and rights to the body before slumping on to his stool at the bell.   
  
Having beaten the fast-rising [[Teddy Yarosz]] a few weeks earlier, and in doing so breaking the latter’s winning streak at 59, [[Eddie Wolfe]] moved himself into title contention. Despite losing to [[Tony Herrera]], [[Jack Portney]], [[Frankie Hughes]] and [[Harry Dublinsky]], the last two defeats being avenged, Wolfe drew with Yarosz and [[Paulie Walker]] as well as beating men of the calibre of [[Tracey Cox]], [[Ray Kiser]] (twice) and [[Eddie Ran]] before being outpointed by [[Willard Brown]] in July 1934. Although Wolfe gained revenge over Brown he won just four of ten more fights before retiring.  
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Having beaten the fast-rising [[Teddy Yarosz]] a few weeks earlier, and in doing so breaking the latter’s winning streak at 59, [[Eddie Wolfe]] moved himself into title contention. Despite losing to [[Tony Herrera]], [[Jack Portney]], [[Frankie Hughes]] and [[Harry Dublinsky]], the last two defeats being avenged, Wolfe had drawn with Yarosz and [[Paulie Walker]]. He had also beaten men of the calibre of [[Tracey Cox]], [[Ray Kiser]] (twice) and [[Eddie Ran]] before being outpointed by [[Willard Brown]] in July 1934. Although Wolfe gained revenge over Brown and beat [[Tiger Joe Randall]], Cox and [[George Salvadore]], they were his only wins in his final ten fights.  
  
 
After beating Wolfe, Brown was ranked as high as fourth by ''The Ring'' magazine, but having been stopped twice in succession in Australia by [[Jack Carroll]] (4 March 1935) and Portney (29 April 1935) he never again got close to a title shot.
 
After beating Wolfe, Brown was ranked as high as fourth by ''The Ring'' magazine, but having been stopped twice in succession in Australia by [[Jack Carroll]] (4 March 1935) and Portney (29 April 1935) he never again got close to a title shot.

Latest revision as of 10:39, 29 May 2013

1933-02-22 Young Corbett 111 w pts 10 Jackie Fields, Seals Stadium, San Francisco, California, USA - WORLD. Referee: Jack Kennedy. Called the conqueror of champions, Corbett (146) lived up to his name when outboxing and outpunching Fields (146) in six of the ten sessions to take the referee’s decision. Fighting in whirlwind fashion, the southpaw challenger took Fields completely by surprise as he fired in long lefts from the start while effectively countering anything coming his way. After losing the first five rounds Fields came to life in the sixth, belting Corbett to head and body at will before tiring after taking some heavy lefts in the seventh and eighth rounds, which stopped him in his tracks. The ninth and tenth sessions saw Fields battering Corbett around the ring in a desperate bid to hold on to his title, but with a minute to go he was badly hurt by lefts to the jaw and rights to the body before slumping on to his stool at the bell.

Having beaten the fast-rising Teddy Yarosz a few weeks earlier, and in doing so breaking the latter’s winning streak at 59, Eddie Wolfe moved himself into title contention. Despite losing to Tony Herrera, Jack Portney, Frankie Hughes and Harry Dublinsky, the last two defeats being avenged, Wolfe had drawn with Yarosz and Paulie Walker. He had also beaten men of the calibre of Tracey Cox, Ray Kiser (twice) and Eddie Ran before being outpointed by Willard Brown in July 1934. Although Wolfe gained revenge over Brown and beat Tiger Joe Randall, Cox and George Salvadore, they were his only wins in his final ten fights.

After beating Wolfe, Brown was ranked as high as fourth by The Ring magazine, but having been stopped twice in succession in Australia by Jack Carroll (4 March 1935) and Portney (29 April 1935) he never again got close to a title shot.