1933-03-17 Ben Jeby drew 15 Vince Dundee, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY

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1933-03-17 [[Ben Jeby]] drew 15 [[Vince Dundee]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY. Referee: Eddie Forbes. Scorecards: 9-3, 5-9, 7-7. According to most newspaper reports the decision of a draw was a disgrace and Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine reflected that when a fighter wins by such a large amount of points as did Dundee there should be no reason for such a divergence of opinion among the officials. Incidentally, Fleischer had Dundee winning by eight rounds to five with two even. The referee, who gave it as seven rounds apiece with one even, said afterwards that he’d cautioned Dundee many times for holding and that was the reason for his scoring.  
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1933-03-17 [[Ben Jeby]] drew 15 [[Vince Dundee]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY. Referee: Eddie Forbes. Scorecards: 9-3, 5-9, 7-7. According to most newspaper reports the decision of a draw was a disgrace and Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine reflected that when a fighter wins by such a large amount of points as did Dundee there should be no reason for such a divergence of opinion among the officials. Incidentally, Fleischer had Dundee winning by eight rounds to five with two even. The referee, who gave it as seven rounds apiece with one even, said afterwards that he had cautioned Dundee many times for holding and that was the reason for his scoring.  
  
 
The fight itself saw Jeby (159½) as the aggressor, throwing many low punches for which he was not cautioned, and Dundee (159¾), sending out left jabs that seemed to be in the champion’s face for much of the time. Although the fight started slowly, Dundee held the upper hand most of the time, apart from the seventh and eighth sessions when Jeby got through with solid lefts and rights to the head. At the final bell Jeby looked a sorry sight, his left eye almost closed and carrying swellings to his nose and mouth.  
 
The fight itself saw Jeby (159½) as the aggressor, throwing many low punches for which he was not cautioned, and Dundee (159¾), sending out left jabs that seemed to be in the champion’s face for much of the time. Although the fight started slowly, Dundee held the upper hand most of the time, apart from the seventh and eighth sessions when Jeby got through with solid lefts and rights to the head. At the final bell Jeby looked a sorry sight, his left eye almost closed and carrying swellings to his nose and mouth.  

Revision as of 12:33, 12 March 2012

1933-03-17 Ben Jeby drew 15 Vince Dundee, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY. Referee: Eddie Forbes. Scorecards: 9-3, 5-9, 7-7. According to most newspaper reports the decision of a draw was a disgrace and Nat Fleischer, writing in The Ring magazine reflected that when a fighter wins by such a large amount of points as did Dundee there should be no reason for such a divergence of opinion among the officials. Incidentally, Fleischer had Dundee winning by eight rounds to five with two even. The referee, who gave it as seven rounds apiece with one even, said afterwards that he had cautioned Dundee many times for holding and that was the reason for his scoring.

The fight itself saw Jeby (159½) as the aggressor, throwing many low punches for which he was not cautioned, and Dundee (159¾), sending out left jabs that seemed to be in the champion’s face for much of the time. Although the fight started slowly, Dundee held the upper hand most of the time, apart from the seventh and eighth sessions when Jeby got through with solid lefts and rights to the head. At the final bell Jeby looked a sorry sight, his left eye almost closed and carrying swellings to his nose and mouth.

Any hopes that Gorilla Jones had of furthering his title claims were abandoned following his six-round no-contest at the Public Hall, Cleveland against Jeby on 19 April 1933, when it seemed to many bystanders that both men were looking to set up a rematch with the championship at stake.

This was followed a few weeks later at The Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, when Lou Brouillard outpointed Sammy Slaughter over ten rounds on 16 May. Perhaps not surprisingly, with the middleweight division in some disarray, prior to the fight Brouillard’s people had asked the Massachusetts Boxing Commission to recognise it as being for their version of the world title but were turned down.

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