Difference between revisions of "1933-05-19 Kid Chocolate w pts 15 Seaman Tommy Watson, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY/GB"

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1933-05-19 [[Kid Chocolate]] w pts 15 [[Seaman Tommy Watson]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY/GB. Referee: Pete Hartley. Rough, tough and willing, Watson (125½) gave it his best shot as he looked to bash up an off-key Chocolate (123½), who seemed to have gone backwards as a first-class fighter, his speed and skill of yore sadly missing. If Watson, who was downed somewhat luckily in the tenth round, had been able to vary his game plan instead of getting inside and banging to the body regardless it could have been different. Unfortunately for Watson he lacked the guile required to win the championship and the unanimous decision against him came as no surprise.  
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1933-05-19 [[Kid Chocolate]] w pts 15 [[Seaman Tommy Watson]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY/GB. Referee: Pete Hartley. Rough, tough and willing, Watson (125½) gave it his best shot as he looked to bash up an off-key Chocolate (123½), who seemed to have gone backwards as a first-class fighter, his speed and skill of yore sadly missing. If Watson, who was downed somewhat luckily in the tenth round, had been able to vary his game plan instead of getting inside and banging to the body regardless it could have been different. Unfortunately for Watson he lacked the guile required to win the championship, the unanimous decision against him coming as no surprise.  
  
 
Unable to make the weight any longer, Chocolate relinquished the New York version of the title in February 1934.  
 
Unable to make the weight any longer, Chocolate relinquished the New York version of the title in February 1934.  
  
With the NYSAC still not recognising [[Freddie Miller]] as champion, they had planned to set up an extensive elimination tournament in order to produce a successor, but unfortunately things did not go to plan. With over 40 entries, the tournament kicked off at the Lenox SC, Manhattan, NYC on 24 April 1934 with [[Charley Van Reedon]] and [[Vernon Cormier]] securing 10-round point victories over [[Andy Martin]] and [[Johnny Hinds]], respectively. However, it was a financial flop and with far too many good men becoming unavailable, including [[Jackie Wilson]], when it was discovered that Van Reedon had recently been defeated by [[Frankie Covelli]] and Martin had been inactive since November 1931, the Commission decided on setting up a watered down elimination series. Thus, on 11 May 1934 at Madison Square Garden, [[Baby Arizmendi]], replacing Italy’s [[Vittorio Tamagnini]], outpointed [[Al Roth]] over ten rounds and [[Mike Belloise]] gained a similar result over [[Petey Hayes]], prior to them being matched to contest the vacant NYSAC version of the title.
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With the NYSAC still not recognising [[Freddie Miller]] as champion, they had planned to set up an extensive elimination tournament in order to produce a successor, but unfortunately things did not go to plan. With over 40 entries the tournament kicked off at the Lenox SC, Manhattan, NYC on 24 April 1934 when [[Charley Van Reedon]] and [[Vernon Cormier]] secured 10-round points victories over [[Andy Martin]] and [[Johnny Hinds]], respectively. However, it was a financial flop, and with far too many good men becoming unavailable, including [[Jackie Wilson]], when it was discovered that Van Reedon had recently been defeated by [[Frankie Covelli]] and Martin had been inactive since November 1931, the Commission decided on setting up a watered down elimination series. Thus, on 11 May 1934, at Madison Square Garden, [[Baby Arizmendi]], replacing Italy’s [[Vittorio Tamagnini]], outpointed [[Al Roth]] over ten rounds while [[Mike Belloise]] gained a similar result over [[Petey Hayes]]. Further to that, the pair were matched to contest the vacant NYSAC version of the title.
  
 
[[Category: 1933 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1933 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 10:28, 3 April 2013

1933-05-19 Kid Chocolate w pts 15 Seaman Tommy Watson, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - NY/GB. Referee: Pete Hartley. Rough, tough and willing, Watson (125½) gave it his best shot as he looked to bash up an off-key Chocolate (123½), who seemed to have gone backwards as a first-class fighter, his speed and skill of yore sadly missing. If Watson, who was downed somewhat luckily in the tenth round, had been able to vary his game plan instead of getting inside and banging to the body regardless it could have been different. Unfortunately for Watson he lacked the guile required to win the championship, the unanimous decision against him coming as no surprise.

Unable to make the weight any longer, Chocolate relinquished the New York version of the title in February 1934.

With the NYSAC still not recognising Freddie Miller as champion, they had planned to set up an extensive elimination tournament in order to produce a successor, but unfortunately things did not go to plan. With over 40 entries the tournament kicked off at the Lenox SC, Manhattan, NYC on 24 April 1934 when Charley Van Reedon and Vernon Cormier secured 10-round points victories over Andy Martin and Johnny Hinds, respectively. However, it was a financial flop, and with far too many good men becoming unavailable, including Jackie Wilson, when it was discovered that Van Reedon had recently been defeated by Frankie Covelli and Martin had been inactive since November 1931, the Commission decided on setting up a watered down elimination series. Thus, on 11 May 1934, at Madison Square Garden, Baby Arizmendi, replacing Italy’s Vittorio Tamagnini, outpointed Al Roth over ten rounds while Mike Belloise gained a similar result over Petey Hayes. Further to that, the pair were matched to contest the vacant NYSAC version of the title.