Difference between revisions of "1936-10-29 Gustave Roth w pts 15 Adolf Witt, Sports Palace, Berlin, Germany - IBU"

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1936-10-29 [[Gustave Roth]] w pts 15 [[Adolph Witt]], Sports Palace, Berlin, Germany - IBU. Referee: Maurice Nicod. Making his first defence of the IBU version of the world title, the clever Roth (165¼), despite being put down in the fifth, generally knew too much for the hard-punching Witt (172), who continuously looked to get his big punches off. Once the champion had taken the steam out of Witt, mainly by excellent use of the left jab and good footwork, he set about the latter with well-placed rights to the jaw, which produced knockdowns in rounds ten and 15 before he landed the unanimous decision of the judges.   
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1936-10-29 [[Gustave Roth]] w pts 15 [[Adolf Witt]], Sports Palace, Berlin, Germany - IBU. Referee: Maurice Nicod. Making his first defence of the IBU version of the world title, the clever Roth (165¼), despite being put down in the fifth, generally knew too much for the hard-punching Witt (172), who continuously looked to get his big punches off. Once the champion had taken the steam out of Witt, mainly by excellent use of the left jab and good footwork, he set about the latter with well-placed rights to the jaw, which produced knockdowns in rounds ten and 15 before he landed the unanimous decision of the judges.   
  
 
[[Category: 1936 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1936 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Light Heavyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Light Heavyweight Division]]

Revision as of 12:01, 30 January 2012

1936-10-29 Gustave Roth w pts 15 Adolf Witt, Sports Palace, Berlin, Germany - IBU. Referee: Maurice Nicod. Making his first defence of the IBU version of the world title, the clever Roth (165¼), despite being put down in the fifth, generally knew too much for the hard-punching Witt (172), who continuously looked to get his big punches off. Once the champion had taken the steam out of Witt, mainly by excellent use of the left jab and good footwork, he set about the latter with well-placed rights to the jaw, which produced knockdowns in rounds ten and 15 before he landed the unanimous decision of the judges.