Difference between revisions of "1937-08-30 Joe Louis w pts 15 Tommy Farr, Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - NY/NBA/GB"

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1937-08-30 [[Joe Louis]] w pts 15 [[Tommy Farr]], Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA – USA/GB. Referee: Arthur Donovan. Scorecards: 13-1, 9-6, 8-5. Going into the ring to end the fight as quickly as possible, the champion met a man who would not succumb like some of his previous opponents and would give him a proper run for his money. Fighting savagely throughout the contest, Farr (204½) was there for the sole purpose of winning and he took all Louis (197) could muster and dished out plenty of his own despite suffering a badly swollen thumb. Farr’s long reach and bobbing and weaving style made him a difficult opponent for Louis and although he was cut up badly he continued to go with the jab. Taking Louis’ best shots unflinchingly, especially in the seventh, and then to walk into the champion in the eighth as though no nothing had happened brought cheers from the crowd. By the end of the 11th, Nat Fleischer of ''The Ring'' magazine’s card had the two men dead level, but the remainder of the bout saw Louis piling up points with the left as Farr, by now badly cut and bruised facially, tried hard to force matters but to no avail.  
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1937-08-30 [[Joe Louis]] w pts 15 [[Tommy Farr]], Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA – NY/NBA/GB. Referee: Arthur Donovan. Scorecards: 13-1, 9-6, 8-5. Going into the ring to end the fight as quickly as possible, the champion met a man who would not succumb like some of his previous opponents and would give him a proper run for his money. Fighting savagely throughout the contest, Farr (204½) was there for the sole purpose of winning and he took all Louis (197) could muster and dished out plenty of his own despite suffering a badly swollen thumb. Farr’s long reach and bobbing and weaving style made him a difficult opponent for Louis and although he was cut up badly he continued to go with the jab. Taking Louis’ best shots unflinchingly, especially in the seventh, and then to walk into the champion in the eighth as though no nothing had happened brought cheers from the crowd. By the end of the 11th, Nat Fleischer of ''The Ring'' magazine’s card had the two men dead level, but the remainder of the bout saw Louis piling up points with the left as Farr, by now badly cut and bruised facially, tried hard to force matters but to no avail.  
  
 
Even though Louis claimed that he had damaged both hands prior to the fight it did not wear with the fans in the light of the pre-fight predictions that Farr would only last a few rounds at most. In the aftermath of the contest, it became apparent that [[Max Schmeling]] would finally get his opportunity to meet Louis when he was contracted to meet the champion the following summer in New York. In the event of beating Louis and returning to Nazi Germany, Schmeling was also contracted to defend his title in America and fight for Mike Jacobs, up to and through 1939.
 
Even though Louis claimed that he had damaged both hands prior to the fight it did not wear with the fans in the light of the pre-fight predictions that Farr would only last a few rounds at most. In the aftermath of the contest, it became apparent that [[Max Schmeling]] would finally get his opportunity to meet Louis when he was contracted to meet the champion the following summer in New York. In the event of beating Louis and returning to Nazi Germany, Schmeling was also contracted to defend his title in America and fight for Mike Jacobs, up to and through 1939.

Revision as of 15:37, 27 June 2012

1937-08-30 Joe Louis w pts 15 Tommy Farr, Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA – NY/NBA/GB. Referee: Arthur Donovan. Scorecards: 13-1, 9-6, 8-5. Going into the ring to end the fight as quickly as possible, the champion met a man who would not succumb like some of his previous opponents and would give him a proper run for his money. Fighting savagely throughout the contest, Farr (204½) was there for the sole purpose of winning and he took all Louis (197) could muster and dished out plenty of his own despite suffering a badly swollen thumb. Farr’s long reach and bobbing and weaving style made him a difficult opponent for Louis and although he was cut up badly he continued to go with the jab. Taking Louis’ best shots unflinchingly, especially in the seventh, and then to walk into the champion in the eighth as though no nothing had happened brought cheers from the crowd. By the end of the 11th, Nat Fleischer of The Ring magazine’s card had the two men dead level, but the remainder of the bout saw Louis piling up points with the left as Farr, by now badly cut and bruised facially, tried hard to force matters but to no avail.

Even though Louis claimed that he had damaged both hands prior to the fight it did not wear with the fans in the light of the pre-fight predictions that Farr would only last a few rounds at most. In the aftermath of the contest, it became apparent that Max Schmeling would finally get his opportunity to meet Louis when he was contracted to meet the champion the following summer in New York. In the event of beating Louis and returning to Nazi Germany, Schmeling was also contracted to defend his title in America and fight for Mike Jacobs, up to and through 1939.