Difference between revisions of "1938-08-17 Henry Armstrong w pts 15 Lou Ambers, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD"

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1938-08-17 [[Henry Armstrong]] w pts 15 [[Lou Ambers]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Billy Cavanagh. Scorecards: 8-6, 7-6, 7-8. Starting off at a whirlwind pace, Armstrong (134) backed Ambers (134¼) against the ropes for most of the action, battering the body with great effect despite receiving three cautions for low blows, and had the champion down from a crunching right to the jaw in the fifth round and again in the sixth. That Ambers fought back gamely to give Armstrong more trouble than he had been forced to take on board previously was rewarded on one of the judges’ scorecards, his efforts being highlighted in the 13th session as he stormed into the challenger, whipping in savage blows to force his rival back. However, with both men tiring, that was the final spell of mass excitement and both were glad to hear the final bell when it came.
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1938-08-17 [[Henry Armstrong]] w pts 15 [[Lou Ambers]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Billy Cavanagh. Scorecards: 8-6, 7-6, 7-8. Starting off at a whirlwind pace Armstrong (134) backed Ambers (134¼) against the ropes for most of the action, battering the body with great effect despite receiving three cautions for low blows, and had the champion down from a crunching right to the jaw in the fifth round and again in the sixth. That Ambers fought back gamely to give Armstrong more trouble than he had been forced to take on board previously was rewarded on one of the judges’ scorecards, his efforts being highlighted in the 13th session when he stormed into the challenger, whipping in savage blows to force his rival back. However, with the men tiring that was the final spell of mass excitement, both being glad to hear the final bell when it came.
  
On winning Armstrong possessed the proud record of becoming the only man in ring history to hold three world titles simultaneously, having become champion at 126, 147 and 135lbs in that order. Armstrong relinquished the featherweight title in November.   
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On winning, Armstrong possessed the proud record of becoming the only man in ring history to hold three world titles simultaneously, having become champion at 126, 147 and 135lbs in that order. Armstrong relinquished the featherweight title in November.   
  
Prior to their return contest Ambers had won nine out of nine beating top men such as [[Steve Halaiko]], [[Tommy Cross]], [[Frankie Wallace]], [[Paul Junior]] (twice) and [[Baby Arizmendi]], while Armstrong had defended his welterweight title seven times against the cream of the division.
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Prior to their return contest Ambers had won nine out of nine, beating top men such as [[Steve Halaiko]], [[Tommy Cross]], [[Frankie Wallace]], [[Paul Junior]] (twice) and [[Baby Arizmendi]], while Armstrong had defended his welterweight title seven times against the cream of the division.
 
    
 
    
 
[[Category: 1938 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1938 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 11:31, 18 April 2013

1938-08-17 Henry Armstrong w pts 15 Lou Ambers, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Billy Cavanagh. Scorecards: 8-6, 7-6, 7-8. Starting off at a whirlwind pace Armstrong (134) backed Ambers (134¼) against the ropes for most of the action, battering the body with great effect despite receiving three cautions for low blows, and had the champion down from a crunching right to the jaw in the fifth round and again in the sixth. That Ambers fought back gamely to give Armstrong more trouble than he had been forced to take on board previously was rewarded on one of the judges’ scorecards, his efforts being highlighted in the 13th session when he stormed into the challenger, whipping in savage blows to force his rival back. However, with the men tiring that was the final spell of mass excitement, both being glad to hear the final bell when it came.

On winning, Armstrong possessed the proud record of becoming the only man in ring history to hold three world titles simultaneously, having become champion at 126, 147 and 135lbs in that order. Armstrong relinquished the featherweight title in November.

Prior to their return contest Ambers had won nine out of nine, beating top men such as Steve Halaiko, Tommy Cross, Frankie Wallace, Paul Junior (twice) and Baby Arizmendi, while Armstrong had defended his welterweight title seven times against the cream of the division.