Difference between revisions of "1940-03-01 Ceferino Garcia drew 10 Henry Armstrong, Gilmore Stadium, Los Angeles, California, USA - CALIFORNIA"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
1940-03-01 [[Ceferino Garcia]] drew 10 [[Henry Armstrong]], Gilmore Stadium, Los Angeles, California, USA - CALIFORNIA. Referee: George Blake. Although billed as a title fight and given Californian backing, there was no New York championship at stake as it was not supported by the NYSAC, despite them recognising Garcia as champion. There were two good reasons why that was the case. At that time, New York title bouts were of 15-rounds duration, whereas, this was contested over ten stanzas, and under the rules of boxing a champion was entitled to defend at the class limit, but for this go, against the welterweight king, Garcia (153½) was contracted to weigh-in at 152lbs. Having already won the world championship at 126lbs, 135lbs and 147lbs, Armstrong (142) was looking to win a title at middleweight, an unprecedented achievement if successful.  
 
1940-03-01 [[Ceferino Garcia]] drew 10 [[Henry Armstrong]], Gilmore Stadium, Los Angeles, California, USA - CALIFORNIA. Referee: George Blake. Although billed as a title fight and given Californian backing, there was no New York championship at stake as it was not supported by the NYSAC, despite them recognising Garcia as champion. There were two good reasons why that was the case. At that time, New York title bouts were of 15-rounds duration, whereas, this was contested over ten stanzas, and under the rules of boxing a champion was entitled to defend at the class limit, but for this go, against the welterweight king, Garcia (153½) was contracted to weigh-in at 152lbs. Having already won the world championship at 126lbs, 135lbs and 147lbs, Armstrong (142) was looking to win a title at middleweight, an unprecedented achievement if successful.  
  
In what was their second meeting, the fight went ahead despite Garcia coming in one and a half pounds over the contracted weight and in the first round the latter received a cut on his left eye, an injury that would bother him throughout the contest. There was never much between them and every round was virtually the same, with Garcia cutting loose with his heavier armoury for the opening minute or so and Armstrong picking it up from thereon. After the referee had been unable to find a winner, it was really back to square one for both men and writing in ''The Ring'' magazine Nat Fleischer stated that the consensus among reporters covering the contest was that the official erred in calling it a draw and Armstrong should have been given the decision.       
+
In what was their second meeting, the fight went ahead despite Garcia coming in one and a half pounds over the contracted weight and in the first round the latter received a cut on his left eye, an injury that would bother him throughout the contest. There was never much between them and every round was virtually the same, with Garcia cutting loose with his heavier armoury for the opening minute or so and Armstrong picking it up from there on. After the referee had been unable to find a winner, it was really back to square one for both men and writing in ''The Ring'' magazine Nat Fleischer stated that the consensus among reporters covering the contest was that the official erred in calling it a draw and Armstrong should have been given the decision.       
  
 
[[Category: 1940 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1940 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Revision as of 12:12, 23 March 2012

1940-03-01 Ceferino Garcia drew 10 Henry Armstrong, Gilmore Stadium, Los Angeles, California, USA - CALIFORNIA. Referee: George Blake. Although billed as a title fight and given Californian backing, there was no New York championship at stake as it was not supported by the NYSAC, despite them recognising Garcia as champion. There were two good reasons why that was the case. At that time, New York title bouts were of 15-rounds duration, whereas, this was contested over ten stanzas, and under the rules of boxing a champion was entitled to defend at the class limit, but for this go, against the welterweight king, Garcia (153½) was contracted to weigh-in at 152lbs. Having already won the world championship at 126lbs, 135lbs and 147lbs, Armstrong (142) was looking to win a title at middleweight, an unprecedented achievement if successful.

In what was their second meeting, the fight went ahead despite Garcia coming in one and a half pounds over the contracted weight and in the first round the latter received a cut on his left eye, an injury that would bother him throughout the contest. There was never much between them and every round was virtually the same, with Garcia cutting loose with his heavier armoury for the opening minute or so and Armstrong picking it up from there on. After the referee had been unable to find a winner, it was really back to square one for both men and writing in The Ring magazine Nat Fleischer stated that the consensus among reporters covering the contest was that the official erred in calling it a draw and Armstrong should have been given the decision.