1940-05-03 Sammy Angott w pts 15 Davey Day, Jefferson County Armory, Louisville, Kentucky, USA - NBA

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1940-05-03 [[Sammy Angott]] w pts 15 [[Davey Day]], Jefferson County Armory, Louisville, Kentucky, USA - NBA. Referee: Jack Dempsey. Scorecard: 76-74. In a battle for the vacant title, Angott (134½) made a great start, Day (134½) being down for a moment from a body attack in the second round before coming back with rights to the head. It was certainly closely contested, with first one man gaining success and then the other. In the ninth Angott drove Day round the ring, although the latter came back strongly with the jab in the 11th and 13th sessions only to have his energy sapped by body blows. At the final bell both men were blazing away in a desperate bid to swing it in what had been an extremely close affair before Angott received the referee’s verdict.  
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1940-05-03 [[Sammy Angott]] w pts 15 [[Davey Day]], Jefferson County Armory, Louisville, Kentucky, USA - NBA. Referee: Jack Dempsey. Scorecard: 76-74. In a battle for the vacant title, Angott (134½) made a great start, Day (134½) being down for a moment from a body attack in the second round before coming back with rights to the head. It was certainly closely contested, with first one man gaining success and then the other. In the ninth, after Angott drove Day round the ring the latter came back strongly with the jab in the 11th and 13th sessions only to have his energy sapped by body blows in the next session. At the final bell both men were blazing away in a desperate bid to swing it in what had been an extremely close affair, prior to Angott receiving the referee’s verdict.  
  
 
Out of action for nearly five months from the end of the year, following a 12-round points win over the fourth-rated [[Dave Castilloux]] on 2 May 1941 at the Jefferson County Armory at 137lbs it was announced that Angott would defend his title against the seventh-rated [[George Latka]] on 21 June 1941. For whatever reason the fight did not take place. Angott then went on to beat other rated men such as [[Lenny Mancini]] and the Montreal-based Englishman, [[Harry Hurst]], while waiting for the chance to meet [[Lew Jenkins]] in a fight that would unify the title. One non-title contest Angott did not win came against NYC’s future double world champion, [[Sugar Ray Robinson]] (l pts 10 at Shibe Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 21 July 1941). Afterwards, Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine, stated that following Angott v Jenkins the winner should meet Robinson. A nice sentiment, but that was before the latter quickly outgrew the division to become a rated welter within a matter of months.     
 
Out of action for nearly five months from the end of the year, following a 12-round points win over the fourth-rated [[Dave Castilloux]] on 2 May 1941 at the Jefferson County Armory at 137lbs it was announced that Angott would defend his title against the seventh-rated [[George Latka]] on 21 June 1941. For whatever reason the fight did not take place. Angott then went on to beat other rated men such as [[Lenny Mancini]] and the Montreal-based Englishman, [[Harry Hurst]], while waiting for the chance to meet [[Lew Jenkins]] in a fight that would unify the title. One non-title contest Angott did not win came against NYC’s future double world champion, [[Sugar Ray Robinson]] (l pts 10 at Shibe Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 21 July 1941). Afterwards, Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine, stated that following Angott v Jenkins the winner should meet Robinson. A nice sentiment, but that was before the latter quickly outgrew the division to become a rated welter within a matter of months.     

Latest revision as of 12:02, 18 April 2013

1940-05-03 Sammy Angott w pts 15 Davey Day, Jefferson County Armory, Louisville, Kentucky, USA - NBA. Referee: Jack Dempsey. Scorecard: 76-74. In a battle for the vacant title, Angott (134½) made a great start, Day (134½) being down for a moment from a body attack in the second round before coming back with rights to the head. It was certainly closely contested, with first one man gaining success and then the other. In the ninth, after Angott drove Day round the ring the latter came back strongly with the jab in the 11th and 13th sessions only to have his energy sapped by body blows in the next session. At the final bell both men were blazing away in a desperate bid to swing it in what had been an extremely close affair, prior to Angott receiving the referee’s verdict.

Out of action for nearly five months from the end of the year, following a 12-round points win over the fourth-rated Dave Castilloux on 2 May 1941 at the Jefferson County Armory at 137lbs it was announced that Angott would defend his title against the seventh-rated George Latka on 21 June 1941. For whatever reason the fight did not take place. Angott then went on to beat other rated men such as Lenny Mancini and the Montreal-based Englishman, Harry Hurst, while waiting for the chance to meet Lew Jenkins in a fight that would unify the title. One non-title contest Angott did not win came against NYC’s future double world champion, Sugar Ray Robinson (l pts 10 at Shibe Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 21 July 1941). Afterwards, Nat Fleischer, writing in The Ring magazine, stated that following Angott v Jenkins the winner should meet Robinson. A nice sentiment, but that was before the latter quickly outgrew the division to become a rated welter within a matter of months.

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