1941-05-23 Joe Louis w disq 7 (15) Buddy Baer, Griffith Stadium, Washington DC, USA - WORLD

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1941-05-23 Joe Louis w disq 7 (15) Buddy Baer, Griffith Stadium, Washington DC, USA - WORLD. Referee: Arthur Donovan. Baer (237½) became the first man to fight for the title that was once held by his brother and he almost won it when tagging the champion with a tremendous left hook to the jaw in the first round. Although going over the ropes and landing on the ring apron, Louis (201½) was back on his feet at the count of ‘four’ and had started fighting before being given the benefit of an extra 25 seconds when both fighters thought the round had ended. Gaining in confidence, Baer charged into Louis in the second and did well until taking more punches than were necessary in his anxiety to finish the latter off. By the third, Louis was beginning to pick it up and in the fourth he was hurting Baer with jolting lefts and rights to the head. Although Baer began the fifth well, by the end of the session he was being tagged by solid blows to head and body and was staggering at the bell. The sixth saw Louis at his determined best, landing tremendous blows on the game Baer and a right to the chin sent the latter down for ‘six’. Up on his feet, he was felled for the second time and took a count of ‘nine’. At that point, amidst the din of the crowd, Louis, who had not heard the bell, raced over and dropped Baer heavily before being made aware that the round was over. Advised by his handlers to stay on his stool when the bell rang to start the seventh, Baer was disqualified when his manager refused two calls from the referee to leave the ring and he failed to fight on. Adding to the heated discussions after the fight had ended it came to notice that the timer had already counted Baer out, but he had been allowed to fight on because he was on his feet when the referee had reached ‘nine’.