Difference between revisions of "1942-05-15 Sammy Angott w pts 15 Allie Stolz, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD"

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1942-05-15 Sammy Angott w pts 15 Allie Stolz, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Frank Fullam. Scorecards: 8-6, 8-6, 5-9. In a close fight, according to the judges’ cards the cagey Angott (134½) just about warranted the split decision over Stolz (133), despite the latter landing the cleaner punches and scoring the only knockdown of the fight, a cracking right to the jaw that deposited the champion on his back for a nine count in the third round. At the post mortem the insiders felt that had Stolz, who had two points deducted for low blows and paced himself poorly, been better advised the title was his for the taking. Angott relinquished the title in November, when retiring due to an injured hand and Beau Jack, having eliminated Stolz on a seventh-round stoppage at Madison Square Garden on 13 November, was matched against Tippy Larkin to decide New York's version of the vacant title. Nat Fleischer, writing in The Ring magazine, stated that in selecting Jack to meet the fifth-ranked Larkin instead of abiding by its original decision to hold a series of official eliminators would cost the NYSAC public support.  
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1942-05-15 [[Sammy Angott]] w pts 15 [[Allie Stolz]], Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Frank Fullam. Scorecards: 8-6, 8-6, 5-9. In a close fight, according to the judges’ cards the cagey Angott (134½) just about warranted the split decision over Stolz (133), despite the latter landing the cleaner punches and scoring the only knockdown of the fight, a cracking right to the jaw that deposited the champion on his back for a 'nine' count in the third round. At the post mortem the insiders felt that had Stolz, who had two points deducted for low blows and paced himself poorly, been better advised the title was his for the taking.  
  
[[Category: 1942 Lightweight Title Contests]]
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Angott relinquished the title in November, when retiring due to an injured hand and [[Beau Jack]], having eliminated Stolz on a seventh-round stoppage at Madison Square Garden on 13 November, was matched against [[Tippy Larkin]] to decide New York's version of the vacant title. Nat Fleischer, writing in ''The Ring'' magazine, stated that in selecting Jack to meet the fifth-ranked Larkin instead of abiding by its original decision to hold a series of official eliminators would cost the NYSAC public support.
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[[Category: 1942 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Revision as of 10:44, 24 March 2012

1942-05-15 Sammy Angott w pts 15 Allie Stolz, Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Frank Fullam. Scorecards: 8-6, 8-6, 5-9. In a close fight, according to the judges’ cards the cagey Angott (134½) just about warranted the split decision over Stolz (133), despite the latter landing the cleaner punches and scoring the only knockdown of the fight, a cracking right to the jaw that deposited the champion on his back for a 'nine' count in the third round. At the post mortem the insiders felt that had Stolz, who had two points deducted for low blows and paced himself poorly, been better advised the title was his for the taking.

Angott relinquished the title in November, when retiring due to an injured hand and Beau Jack, having eliminated Stolz on a seventh-round stoppage at Madison Square Garden on 13 November, was matched against Tippy Larkin to decide New York's version of the vacant title. Nat Fleischer, writing in The Ring magazine, stated that in selecting Jack to meet the fifth-ranked Larkin instead of abiding by its original decision to hold a series of official eliminators would cost the NYSAC public support.