Difference between revisions of "1952-05-19 Yoshio Shirai w pts 15 Dado Marino, Korakuen Stadium, Tokyo, Japan - WORLD"

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1952-05-19 [[Yoshio Shirai]] w pts 15 [[Dado Marino]], Korakuen Stadium, Tokyo, Japan - WORLD. Referee: Kuniharu Hayashi. Scorecards: 149-145, 146-139, 149-146. Although not a classic the fight was grimly contested, with Shirai (111¾) making the most of his height and reach advantages and never allowing Marino (112) time to settle. There were no knockdowns.  
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1952-05-19 [[Yoshio Shirai]] w pts 15 [[Dado Marino]], Korakuen Stadium, Tokyo, Japan - WORLD. Referee: Kuniharu Hayashi. Scorecards: 149-145, 146-139, 149-146. Although not a classic the fight was grimly contested, with Shirai (111¾) making the most of his height and reach advantages and never allowing Marino (112) time to settle. There were no knockdowns. By his victory, Shirai became the first Japanese-born fighter to win a world title, thus opening the door for a whole raft of future champions.
  
By his victory, Shirai became the first Japanese-born fighter to win a world title, thus opening the door for a whole raft of future champions.
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In Britain a new star had arrived in the shape of South Africa’s [[Jake Tuli]], who turned up with little fanfare to capture the British Empire title from [[Teddy Gardner]] (w rsc 12 at the St James’ Hall, Newcastle, England on 8 September). He next beat [[Jimmy Pearce]] before outpointing [[Honore Pratesi]] over ten rounds at the Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, London on 4 November 1952, a victory that gained him ''The Ring'' magazine number-one rating. His joy, however, was somewhat dampened when Pratesi died two days later, having collapsed following the fight. Defeating top men such as [[Nazzareno Giannelli]], [[Vic Herman]] and [[Eric Marsden]] among others, Tuli retained his top ranking until losing to a fully-fledged bantamweight in [[Dante Bini]] in April 1954 without ever getting a shot at the world title.
  
 
[[Category: 1952 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1952 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Flyweight Division]]

Revision as of 09:31, 3 July 2012

1952-05-19 Yoshio Shirai w pts 15 Dado Marino, Korakuen Stadium, Tokyo, Japan - WORLD. Referee: Kuniharu Hayashi. Scorecards: 149-145, 146-139, 149-146. Although not a classic the fight was grimly contested, with Shirai (111¾) making the most of his height and reach advantages and never allowing Marino (112) time to settle. There were no knockdowns. By his victory, Shirai became the first Japanese-born fighter to win a world title, thus opening the door for a whole raft of future champions.

In Britain a new star had arrived in the shape of South Africa’s Jake Tuli, who turned up with little fanfare to capture the British Empire title from Teddy Gardner (w rsc 12 at the St James’ Hall, Newcastle, England on 8 September). He next beat Jimmy Pearce before outpointing Honore Pratesi over ten rounds at the Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, London on 4 November 1952, a victory that gained him The Ring magazine number-one rating. His joy, however, was somewhat dampened when Pratesi died two days later, having collapsed following the fight. Defeating top men such as Nazzareno Giannelli, Vic Herman and Eric Marsden among others, Tuli retained his top ranking until losing to a fully-fledged bantamweight in Dante Bini in April 1954 without ever getting a shot at the world title.