Difference between revisions of "1952-06-25 Joey Maxim w rtd 13 (15) Sugar Ray Robinson, Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD"

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1952-06-25 Joey Maxim w rtd 13 (15) Sugar Ray Robinson, Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ruby Goldstein. Setting a tremendous pace, the world middleweight champion was the master of Maxim (173) from the opening bell right up until the 11th round when tiredness took over. Even the referee had to be replaced (by Ray Miller) and then treated after the ninth round, having been exhausted by the heat. It was noticeable in the 11th that Robinson (157½) was suffering when he began to stumble. The next two sessions saw much of the same as Robinson struggled with the heat and at one stage in the 13th he fell flat on his face after missing with a punch. Miles in front on the cards, by dint of accurate left jabs, hooks and right crosses, Robinson was retired on his stool at the end of the 13th, having failed in his attempt to become a three-time world champion at different weights. With the British promoter, Jack Solomons, looking to match Maxim against Randy Turpin, who had stopped Don Cockell inside 11 rounds on 10 June at the White City Stadium, Shepherds Bush, London to win the British and British Empire titles, the NYSAC stated that Maxim should meet Archie Moore, a pro for 16 years, before all else. That was rich coming from a body, which along with the NBA, had ignored the persistent claims of Moore, who had, within reason, been rated by The Ring magazine as the division’s leading contender for seven years. However, at that point, the NYSAC did not have access to the contractual arrangements between Solomons and Jack Kearns, Maxim’s manager. Then, having decided he could make more money by fighting Robinson or Jake LaMotta, Maxim decided to give Turpin a miss. This decision was then followed by Maxim being suspended by the NYSAC in September for his failure to honour a contract made with Solomons, which called for him to meet the winner of Turpin v Cockell. At the beginning of September, the NBA ordered Maxim to fight Moore within 60 days and the winner to meet Turpin within 90 days. Just days prior to Maxim v Moore, the New York Commission lifted the champion’s suspension when Turpin announced that he had relinquished his British light-heavyweight crown in order to concentrate on regaining the world middleweight title.
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1952-06-25 [[Joey Maxim]] w rtd 13 (15) [[Sugar Ray Robinson]], Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ruby Goldstein. Setting a tremendous pace, the world middleweight champion was the master of Maxim (173) from the opening bell right up until the 11th round when tiredness took over. Even the referee had to be replaced (by Ray Miller) and then treated after the ninth round, having been exhausted by the heat. It was noticeable in the 11th that Robinson (157½) was suffering when he began to stumble. The next two sessions saw much of the same as Robinson struggled with the heat and at one stage in the 13th he fell flat on his face after missing with a punch. Miles in front on the cards, by dint of accurate left jabs, hooks and right crosses, Robinson was retired on his stool at the end of the 13th, having failed in his attempt to become a three-time world champion at different weights.  
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With the British promoter, Jack Solomons, looking to match Maxim against [[Randy Turpin]], who had stopped [[Don Cockell]] inside 11 rounds on 10 June at the White City Stadium, Shepherds Bush, London to win the British and British Empire titles, the NYSAC stated that Maxim should meet [[Archie Moore]], a pro for 16 years, before all else. That was rich coming from a body, which along with the NBA, had ignored the persistent claims of Moore, who had, within reason, been rated by ''The Ring'' magazine as the division’s leading contender for seven years. However, at that point, the NYSAC did not have access to the contractual arrangements between Solomons and Jack Kearns, Maxim’s manager.  
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Having decided he could make more money by fighting Robinson or [[Jake LaMotta]], Maxim decided to give Turpin a miss. This decision was then followed by Maxim being suspended by the NYSAC in September for his failure to honour a contract made with Solomons, which called for him to meet the winner of Turpin v Cockell. At the beginning of September, the NBA ordered Maxim to fight Moore within 60 days and the winner to meet Turpin within 90 days. Just days prior to Maxim v Moore, the New York Commission lifted the champion’s suspension when Turpin announced that he had relinquished his British light-heavyweight crown in order to concentrate on regaining the world middleweight title.
  
 
[[Category: 1952 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1952 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Light Heavyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Light Heavyweight Division]]

Revision as of 15:10, 30 January 2012

1952-06-25 Joey Maxim w rtd 13 (15) Sugar Ray Robinson, Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NYC, New York, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ruby Goldstein. Setting a tremendous pace, the world middleweight champion was the master of Maxim (173) from the opening bell right up until the 11th round when tiredness took over. Even the referee had to be replaced (by Ray Miller) and then treated after the ninth round, having been exhausted by the heat. It was noticeable in the 11th that Robinson (157½) was suffering when he began to stumble. The next two sessions saw much of the same as Robinson struggled with the heat and at one stage in the 13th he fell flat on his face after missing with a punch. Miles in front on the cards, by dint of accurate left jabs, hooks and right crosses, Robinson was retired on his stool at the end of the 13th, having failed in his attempt to become a three-time world champion at different weights.

With the British promoter, Jack Solomons, looking to match Maxim against Randy Turpin, who had stopped Don Cockell inside 11 rounds on 10 June at the White City Stadium, Shepherds Bush, London to win the British and British Empire titles, the NYSAC stated that Maxim should meet Archie Moore, a pro for 16 years, before all else. That was rich coming from a body, which along with the NBA, had ignored the persistent claims of Moore, who had, within reason, been rated by The Ring magazine as the division’s leading contender for seven years. However, at that point, the NYSAC did not have access to the contractual arrangements between Solomons and Jack Kearns, Maxim’s manager.

Having decided he could make more money by fighting Robinson or Jake LaMotta, Maxim decided to give Turpin a miss. This decision was then followed by Maxim being suspended by the NYSAC in September for his failure to honour a contract made with Solomons, which called for him to meet the winner of Turpin v Cockell. At the beginning of September, the NBA ordered Maxim to fight Moore within 60 days and the winner to meet Turpin within 90 days. Just days prior to Maxim v Moore, the New York Commission lifted the champion’s suspension when Turpin announced that he had relinquished his British light-heavyweight crown in order to concentrate on regaining the world middleweight title.