Difference between revisions of "1956-08-24 Joe Brown w pts 15 Wallace Bud Smith, Municipal Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA - WORLD"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
1956-08-24 [[Joe Brown]] w pts 15 [[Wallace Bud Smith]], Municipal Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ronald Brown. Scorecards: 9-3, 12-3, 6-7. Although many thought that the 31-year-old Brown, or ‘Old Bones’ as he was known, was past his best, having been around since 1943 and run up 87 contests, after decisioning the champion in a non-title bout he could not be ignored any more. It was all Brown (133) in the early rounds, despite breaking his right hand in the second, as he jabbed his way into a clear lead and it was not until the 12th that Smith (134½) showed, when a belated rally pushed the challenger back for a couple of sessions. Unfortunately for Smith it was this new-found aggression that ultimately let him down as he walked on to Brown’s two-fisted counters and took counts of ‘seven’ and ‘nine’ in the 14th. Saved by the bell after the second knockdown the unsteady Smith somehow managed to make it to the end of the fight, hanging on desperately at every opportunity if only to preserve some pride. The fight was expertly summed up by Nat Fleischer of ''The Ring'' magazine, who said: “Although Smith never let up in his efforts to catch Brown, he was baffled by the latter’s backward movements, his bobbing and weaving and straight lefts to the face and failed to land effectively”. Fleischer, reacting to those who thought that Smith should have retained his title on aggression alone, was correct in his assertion that scoring punches win fights not anything else.   
+
1956-08-24 [[Joe Brown]] w pts 15 [[Wallace Bud Smith]], Municipal Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ronald Brown. Scorecards: 9-3, 12-3, 6-7. Although many thought that the 31-year-old Brown, or ‘Old Bones’ as he was known, was past his best, having been around since 1943 and run up 87 contests, after decisioning the champion in a non-title bout he could not be ignored any more. It was all Brown (133) in the early rounds, despite breaking his right hand in the second, as he jabbed his way into a clear lead, and it was not until the 12th that Smith (134½) showed when a belated rally pushed the challenger back for a couple of sessions. Unfortunately for Smith it was this new-found aggression that ultimately let him down as he walked on to Brown’s two-fisted counters, taking counts of ‘seven’ and ‘nine’ in the 14th. Saved by the bell after the second knockdown the unsteady Smith somehow managed to make it to the end of the fight, hanging on desperately at every opportunity if only to preserve some pride. The fight was expertly summed up by Nat Fleischer of ''The Ring'' magazine, who said: “Although Smith never let up in his efforts to catch Brown, he was baffled by the latter’s backward movements, his bobbing and weaving and straight lefts to the face and failed to land effectively”. Fleischer, reacting to those who thought that Smith should have retained his title on aggression alone, was correct in his assertion that scoring punches win fights not anything else.   
  
 
[[Category: 1956 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1956 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Lightweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 11:26, 19 April 2013

1956-08-24 Joe Brown w pts 15 Wallace Bud Smith, Municipal Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA - WORLD. Referee: Ronald Brown. Scorecards: 9-3, 12-3, 6-7. Although many thought that the 31-year-old Brown, or ‘Old Bones’ as he was known, was past his best, having been around since 1943 and run up 87 contests, after decisioning the champion in a non-title bout he could not be ignored any more. It was all Brown (133) in the early rounds, despite breaking his right hand in the second, as he jabbed his way into a clear lead, and it was not until the 12th that Smith (134½) showed when a belated rally pushed the challenger back for a couple of sessions. Unfortunately for Smith it was this new-found aggression that ultimately let him down as he walked on to Brown’s two-fisted counters, taking counts of ‘seven’ and ‘nine’ in the 14th. Saved by the bell after the second knockdown the unsteady Smith somehow managed to make it to the end of the fight, hanging on desperately at every opportunity if only to preserve some pride. The fight was expertly summed up by Nat Fleischer of The Ring magazine, who said: “Although Smith never let up in his efforts to catch Brown, he was baffled by the latter’s backward movements, his bobbing and weaving and straight lefts to the face and failed to land effectively”. Fleischer, reacting to those who thought that Smith should have retained his title on aggression alone, was correct in his assertion that scoring punches win fights not anything else.