Difference between revisions of "1964-05-09 Sugar Ramos w pts 15 Floyd Robertson, Sports Stadium, Accra, Ghana - WORLD"

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1964-05-09 Sugar Ramos w pts 15 Floyd Robertson, Sports Stadium, Accra, Ghana - WORLD. Referee: Jack Hart. Scorecards: 70-69, 70-69, 69-70. Never seriously troubled, the challenger gave as good as he got and Ramos (125¼), still having trouble at the weight, finished with cuts over both eyes, and distinctly lucky to have two of the three judges voting in his favour. Robertson (124¼), who was cut on the right eye in the seventh, drove Ramos around the ring during the last three rounds and looked to have pegged back the champion’s early lead. Following the fight, the Ghanaian Boxing Commission altered the result to that of a no-contest and later changed the decision in Robertson's favour, despite the rest of the world continuing to recognise Ramos as the champion. While Robertson remained inactive for well over a year, Ramos’ next challenger would be Vicente Saldivar, who outpointed Ismael Laguna over ten rounds at the Bullring, Tijuana, Mexico on 1 June to gain his opportunity. Saldivar, the Mexican champion, had turned pro in early 1961 and had quickly made his mark as a hard-punching, awkwardly effective southpaw, who gave opponents no respite.
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1964-05-09 [[Sugar Ramos]] w pts 15 [[Floyd Robertson]], Sports Stadium, Accra, Ghana - WORLD. Referee: Jack Hart. Scorecards: 70-69, 70-69, 69-70. Never seriously troubled, the challenger gave as good as he got while Ramos (125¼), still having trouble at the weight, finished with cuts over both eyes, and distinctly lucky to have two of the three judges voting in his favour. Robertson (124¼), who was cut on the right eye in the seventh, drove Ramos around the ring during the last three rounds, many thinking he had pegged back the champion’s early lead.  
  
[[Category: 1964 Featherweight Title Contests]]
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Following the fight, the Ghanaian Boxing Commission altered the result to that of a no-contest and later changed the decision in Robertson's favour, despite the rest of the world continuing to recognise Ramos as the champion.
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While Robertson remained inactive for well over a year, Ramos’ next challenger would be [[Vicente Saldivar]], who outpointed [[Ismael Laguna]] over ten rounds at the Bullring, Tijuana, Mexico on 1 June to gain his opportunity. Saldivar, the Mexican champion, had turned pro in early 1961 and had quickly made his mark as a hard-punching, awkwardly effective southpaw, who gave opponents no respite.
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[[Category: 1964 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Featherweight Division]]

Revision as of 17:23, 8 December 2012

1964-05-09 Sugar Ramos w pts 15 Floyd Robertson, Sports Stadium, Accra, Ghana - WORLD. Referee: Jack Hart. Scorecards: 70-69, 70-69, 69-70. Never seriously troubled, the challenger gave as good as he got while Ramos (125¼), still having trouble at the weight, finished with cuts over both eyes, and distinctly lucky to have two of the three judges voting in his favour. Robertson (124¼), who was cut on the right eye in the seventh, drove Ramos around the ring during the last three rounds, many thinking he had pegged back the champion’s early lead.

Following the fight, the Ghanaian Boxing Commission altered the result to that of a no-contest and later changed the decision in Robertson's favour, despite the rest of the world continuing to recognise Ramos as the champion.

While Robertson remained inactive for well over a year, Ramos’ next challenger would be Vicente Saldivar, who outpointed Ismael Laguna over ten rounds at the Bullring, Tijuana, Mexico on 1 June to gain his opportunity. Saldivar, the Mexican champion, had turned pro in early 1961 and had quickly made his mark as a hard-punching, awkwardly effective southpaw, who gave opponents no respite.