Difference between revisions of "1976-06-18 Eckhard Dagge w rtd 10 (15) Elisha Obed, National Hall, Berlin, Germany - WBC"

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1976-06-18 Eckhard Dagge w rtd 10 (15) Elisha Obed, National Hall, Berlin, Germany - WBC. Referee: Jay Edson. Fighting as though he meant business, the champion came out with the left jab going into the face of Dagge (154) on a regular basis and while he was less accurate with his right hands it seemed as though it was just a matter of time. In the fourth Obed (154) finally dropped Dagge with a right to the jaw just as the bell rang and despite being hurt the German came back to shade the next two sessions, especially when catching the champion off balance with a solid right. Although Obed was still picking up the points with the left hand, the next three rounds saw a shift in fortunes as Dagge sent in some damaging body blows, but nobody was more surprised than he when after 1.47 of the tenth the fight came to an abrupt end as the champion turned away and made for his corner. Following the fight, Obed stated that he’d had real trouble in focusing on Dagge in the tenth and was fighting on instinct alone, a statement that was backed up by a German doctor, who said that the Bahamaian’s blood circulation could have been interrupted by heavy blows to the arms. According to the referee, Obed ran out of gas.         
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1976-06-18 [[Eckhard Dagge]] w rtd 10 (15) [[Elisha Obed]], National Hall, Berlin, Germany - WBC. Referee: Jay Edson. Fighting as though he meant business the champion came out with the left jab going into the face of Dagge (154) on a regular basis, and while he was less accurate with his right hand it seemed as though it was just a matter of time. In the fourth, Obed (154) finally dropped Dagge with a right to the jaw just as the bell rang. Despite being clearly hurt the German came back to shade the next two sessions, especially when catching the champion off balance with a solid right. Although Obed was still picking up the points with the left hand the next three rounds saw a shift in fortunes as Dagge sent in some damaging body blows, but nobody was more surprised than he when after 1.47 of the tenth the fight came to an abrupt end as the champion turned away and made for his corner. Following the fight, Obed stated that he’d had real trouble in focusing on Dagge in the tenth and was fighting on instinct alone, a statement that was backed up by a German doctor who said that the Bahamian’s blood circulation could have been interrupted by heavy blows to the arms. According to the referee, Obed ran out of gas.         
  
 
[[Category: 1976 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1976 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Junior Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Junior Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 11:58, 8 June 2013

1976-06-18 Eckhard Dagge w rtd 10 (15) Elisha Obed, National Hall, Berlin, Germany - WBC. Referee: Jay Edson. Fighting as though he meant business the champion came out with the left jab going into the face of Dagge (154) on a regular basis, and while he was less accurate with his right hand it seemed as though it was just a matter of time. In the fourth, Obed (154) finally dropped Dagge with a right to the jaw just as the bell rang. Despite being clearly hurt the German came back to shade the next two sessions, especially when catching the champion off balance with a solid right. Although Obed was still picking up the points with the left hand the next three rounds saw a shift in fortunes as Dagge sent in some damaging body blows, but nobody was more surprised than he when after 1.47 of the tenth the fight came to an abrupt end as the champion turned away and made for his corner. Following the fight, Obed stated that he’d had real trouble in focusing on Dagge in the tenth and was fighting on instinct alone, a statement that was backed up by a German doctor who said that the Bahamian’s blood circulation could have been interrupted by heavy blows to the arms. According to the referee, Obed ran out of gas.